MISSISSAUGA JUDICIAL INQUIRY –Commissioner J. Douglas Cunningham’s decision: “In balancing these three considerations, I conclude that citizen journalists should have access to unedited, raw footage of the Inquiry proceedings.”

April 26th, 2010  

YES! YES! YES! I’m so happy!

My favourite part is Commissioner Cunningham writing:

In balancing these three considerations, I conclude that citizen journalists should have access to unedited, raw footage of the Inquiry proceedings. This access will promote freedom of expression, and allow Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett to report on aspects of the Inquiry that may not be covered by the accredited media.

That means he got my part about there not being any media in MYTHissauga.

The Mississauga News just came out with Split decision for citizen journalists. Not for me it wasn’t. I didn’t really want to videotape! I’d be forced to change batteries and I wouldn’t have a complete unaltered record that way. Plus I wanted to draw/sketch in court and you can’t do that and videotape too. All I wanted was the Rogers feed for historical records and got it!

This leaves me free to be court sketcher. Like this sketch I made on April 2, 2007 when Donald Barber had to fight off the Misstapo (rhymes with Gestapo) and the evil empire at Brampton Courthouse.

BRAMPTON COURTHOUSE COMMENT during DONALD BARBER COURT APPEARANCE APRIL 2, 2007

Commissioner J. Douglas Cunningham just helped UNstick public inquiries!

Thank you to Commissioner Cunningham but also to “friend of the court”, media specialist/lawyer Peter Downard, for speaking up on behalf of us-citizens and yet still providing that crucial “balance” that I define as “Canadian” and anti-evil-empire.

Okay. Enough from me.

Here’s Commissioner Cunningham’s decision letter.

You can access it directly at the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry website:  Decision of Commissioner Cunningham on Motion by Citizen Journalists for Permission to Record Inquiry Hearings (April 26, 2010)  (1,306Kb / 3 pages).

We’ve scanned the pdf file so Google can access it as HTML, people can do word searches in this document and of course, for ease of cut-and-paste. (The Commissioner’s words are a thing of Beauty.)

Last, if an eagle-eye spots an error, I’d appreciate being advised. Thanks.

[Decision Letter Begins]

City of Mississauga Judicial Inquiry

The Honourable J. Douglas Cunningham, Commissioner

Decision of Commissioner Cunningham

Motion by Citizen Journalists for Permission to Record Inquiry Hearings

The open court principle is a “hallmark of a democratic society”1. Public access to our courts allows all those who are interested to see that justice is administered in a non-arbitrary manner and according to the rule of law. As Mr. Downard explained in his submissions as amicus curiae, it enables justice to be done, and to be seen to be done. This principle is particularly important for public inquiries: open and public hearings instill confidence in the fact-finding, thoroughness and objectivity of a judicial inquiry.

While all who are interested can enter an open court, the reality is that most people will not be able to attend in person. This Inquiry will occupy many weeks and hearings will be held during regular business hours, making it prohibitive for the majority of people to observe the testimony themselves. As a result, they will depend on news organizations to report on the Inquiry’s events and progress.

Representatives of a range of accredited media organizations have attended and reported on the preliminary hearings to date. In addition, two Mississauga residents have been attending and reporting on the Inquiry. Donald Barber of the Democratic Reporter and Ursula Bennett of Mississauga Watch have demonstrated an interest in following and reporting on the Inquiry.

Non-accredited “citizen journalists” can play an important role in the reporting and analysis of events. As both Mr. Downard and Commission Counsel Mr. McDowell explained, the advent of social media and the proliferation of blogs have expanded the role of non-traditional journalists. Indeed, in 2007, the Supreme Court of Canada noted that in this age of electronic media and the blogosphere, it has become increasingly difficult to distinguish between media representatives and ordinary citizens.2 I recognize, of course, that this development is not without its dangers.3

The question before me today is whether, as citizen journalists, Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett should be permitted to videotape the Inquiry proceedings. To date, Inquiry staff have arranged for Rogers Communications to videotape the entire Inquiry, on the condition that it provides feed to all journalists and media representatives with access to the media room.

In light of this, and in response to the request from Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett, I must answer two questions. First, should Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett be permitted to tape the Inquiry? Second, if not, should they be provided access to the Rogers feed? I answer these questions pursuant to the Rules of Procedure for the Inquiry, which provide that television cameras or other recording electronic or photographic equipment are permitted in the hearing room at my discretion.

The courts have identified three interests that I must balance to decide whether citizen journalists can record the proceedings. First, the interest in freedom of expression; second, the interests of the individuals directly involved in the proceedings; and third, the integrity of the process itself.

Freedom of expression includes the freedom to know what is happening in public proceedings, and to communicate about them. As well, as Mr. Barber noted in his submissions, for freedom of expression to be meaningful, members of the public should have access to a broad range of opinions and coverage. To ensure that a variety of perspectives is presented, journalists should have access to the raw footage of the Inquiry, and not only to edited videos.

Second, I must consider the interests of the individuals directly involved in the process. A public inquiry puts individual reputations at risk, and the procedures following at the Inquiry should manage these risks. Personal dignity and privacy should be protected. For example, while a witness’ evidence is a key part of the Inquiry and should be accurately recorded, it is not necessary to record that witness’ facial reactions throughout the other weeks of testimony .4

The third interest is the integrity of the inquiry process itself. This is a legal process, requiring appropriate decorum. Witnesses should not feel targeted or intimidated, and counsel’s written and oral communications should remain privileged. Our procedures should strive, to the extent possible, to prevent even inadvertent capturing of documents or conversations.

In balancing these three considerations, I conclude that citizen journalists should have access to unedited, raw footage of the Inquiry proceedings. This access will promote freedom of expression, and allow Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett to report on aspects of the Inquiry that may not be covered by the accredited media. While the transcripts for each day’s proceeding will be posted on the Inquiry website, usually within five hours of the conclusion of that day’s hearing, I recognize that video footage is often more compelling and journalists have a legitimate interest in accessing it.

Citizens journalists will not, however, be permitted to record the proceedings with their own devices. Rogers has experience recording judicial inquiries, and is familiar with the protocols for doing so. As an accredited news organization, Rogers will be held to the standards of decorum and journalistic integrity that must govern the recording of any inquiry.

Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett, the only two citizen journalists who requested permission to record these proceedings, are to be granted access to the media room and to the Rogers feed. They will make arrangements with Rogers to accept the raw footage, and they are encouraged to contact the Inquiry Communications Officer, Peter Rehak, for assistance with the technological requirements.

Rogers will provide its feed to the media room. All accredited news organizations, Mr. Barber and Ms. Bennett will have access to the media room and to the feed. For all news organizations and journalists, this privilege is subject to the following restrictions:

  1. All journalists and news organizations must comply with the Inquiry rules and with rulings that I may make during the course of the proceedings, including publication bans.
  2. Mr. Rehak will arrange an official photographing opportunity. Photographs are not to be taken in the Inquiry courtroom at any other time.
  3. No video recordings may be taken in the courthouse hallways, nor of individuals entering and exiting the courthouse.
  4. It is my hope that all journalists will report on the Inquiry in a fair and accurate manner. Our courts have developed guiding principles for responsible publication, and I encourage anyone not familiar with these principles to learn about them. By way of example, I note that to be protected under our law of defamation, a fair and accurate report must be balanced and must reflect both sides of an issue. It cannot leave out important information that would give a different view of what transpired, embellish with circumstantial detail or select only fragments of material for their “spiciness”. While I cannot prevent biased reporting, it is not protected by our law of defamation, and will not be condoned in this Inquiry.

If any citizen journalist or news organization fails to abide by these restrictions, I will entertain submissions as to whether I should cancel their access to the media room and the Rogers feed. (Of course, I recognize that individuals could record from the Rogers feed at home, albeit without the sanction of the Commission.)

It is a privilege to conduct this Inquiry in a democracy where citizens are engaged and eager to report on the events. I am grateful for the interest and involvement of citizen journalists, and believe that this ruling strikes an appropriate balance of the interests at stake.

1 Vancouver Sun (Re) [2004] 2 S.C.R. 332 at para. 23.

2 Named Person v. Vancouver Sun, [2007] 3 S.C.R. 252 at para. 153 (in dissent).

3 See, e.g., Crookes v. Wikimedia Foundation Inc., 2009 BCCA 392.

4 In this regard, see Justice Sopinka’s analysis in New Brunswick Broadcasting Co. v. Nova Scotia, where the Court upheld a restriction on hand-held cameras in the Nova Scotia legislature’s public gallery although the restriction may “on occasion detract from the atmosphere of what is going on and no doubt may from time to time deprive the public of a considerable source of amusement”. New Brunswick Broadcasting Co. v. Nova Scotia, [1993] 1 S.C.R. 319 at para. 163.

[Signature]
Cunningham, A.C.J.O. (Commissioner)
April 26, 2010

[Decision Letter Ends]

Oops. This just in from the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry.

Inquiry to hold hearing on Friday

MEDIA RELEASE
City of Mississauga Judicial Inquiry to hold hearing on Friday, April 30, 2010, on Mississauga News motion

Mississauga, Ont., April 26 /CNW/– The City of Mississauga Judicial Inquiry will hold a hearing on Friday, April 30, 2010, to hear a motion by the Mississauga News newspaper for an order that the affidavit of Peter McCallion regarding his ability to pay for counsel at the Inquiry and the cross-examination on that affidavit be made part of the Commission’s record.

The hearing will commence at 10:00 a.m. in Courtroom 1 at 950 Burnhamthorpe Road West.

Mr. McCallion was granted standing at the Inquiry on December 14, 2009. He also requested funding for legal counsel for the Inquiry. Mississauga City Council approved funding of up to $100,000 , on the condition that he provide evidence of his inability to pay, and only covering the time that Mr. McCallion was testifying.  On March 4, 2010 Mr. McCallion brought a motion before the Commissioner, asking him to request the City of Mississauga to reconsider the limit in order to give him the ability to fully participate in the Inquiry. The Commissioner ruled that further evidence was required in order to enable him to make such a recommendation.  The Commissioner ordered that Mr. McCallion swear an affidavit as to his ability to pay for legal counsel, and that Commission Counsel cross-examine Mr. McCallion on that affidavit.  That cross-examination took place earlier this month.

The affidavit and cross-examination transcript are currently confidential and have been provided only to Commission Counsel.  The Commissioner will review the affidavit and the transcript of the cross-examination and make a recommendation to Mississauga City Council as to whether Mr. McCallion should receive additional funding for counsel.

The City of Mississauga Judicial Inquiry is an independent judicial inquiry that was established under Section 274 of the Municipal Act 2001 by a vote of the Mississauga City Council on November 11, 2009. The mandate of the Inquiry is to investigate issues in connection with the acquisition by the City of Mississauga of approximately 8.5 acres of land in the city centre. Mr. Justice J. Douglas Cunningham, Associate Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Justice of Ontario, has been appointed Commissioner.

Further information about the Inquiry is available on its web page: www.mississaugainquiry.ca

————————–

For further information:

William McDowell, Commission counsel: 416-865-9500; wmmcdowell@mississaugainquiry.ca

Last. Peter Downard’s presentation is just so Perfect that I want repeat it all and end today’s Blog with it.

Video: Peter Downard (Lawyer/media specialist) addresses Mississauga Judicial Inquiry –On: citizen journalism

Click here to go directly to the clip on MISSISSAUGAWATCH Vimeo

COURT/VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

 23                 MR. WILLIAM MCDOWELL:  I would ask that we
 24  now hear from Mr. Peter Downard who's here acting as
 25  amicus on this suite of media issues.

24

  1                 COMMISSIONER DOUGLAS CUNNINGHAM:   Thank
  2  you.  Mr. Downard, thank you very much for assisting us.
  3
  4  SUBMISSIONS BY MR. PETER DOWNARD:
  5                 MR. PETER DOWNARD:   I hope I can,
  6  Commissioner.  Thank you.  Good morning.
  7                 Commissioner, the -- the law in this area
  8  primarily involving the openness of public proceedings
  9  has been subject to much careful review and analysis in
 10  the twenty-five (25) years, since the -- the courts have
 11  been rethinking issues of freedom of expression and
 12  public access to -- to justice under the Charter.
 13                 And I think it's fair to say that, in
 14  summary, the jurisprudence identifies that in such cases
 15  there are, essentially, three types of interests that
 16  have to be balanced in any particular situation.
 17                 Those are, first, the interests in freedom
 18  of expression; second, the legitimate individual
 19  interests of those directly involved in the process; and
 20  third, the integrity of the process itself.
 21                 And if I may first speak to the subject of
 22  freedom of expression briefly.  It is very clear that
 23  freedom of expression in our democracy includes the
 24  freedom to know what is going on in public proceedings
 25  and to communicate with others about it.  And to be able

25

  1  to communicate about that, it is necessary for there to
  2  be access to the proceeding.
  3                 Now, the reality is that the public at
  4  large necessarily depends on reporters to obtain that
  5  access for them and to re -- report what goes on to them
  6  because they just can't do it for themselves.
  7                 And in the modern world it is clear that
  8  access to means of mass communication has been extended
  9  far beyond the limits of traditional media organizations.
 10  To -- it has [correction: is] extended to -- to bloggers, to users of --
 11  of social media, the people who have websites.  And if
 12  freedom of expression is to be truly democratic and alive
 13  in the modern world, it must give way to their interests
 14  too.
 15                 Now next, though, I turn to the individual
 16  interests that have to be balanced in this sort of a
 17  situation.  And it was very interesting to -- to hear the
 18  references to 1984 in the submissions today and -- and
 19  the great Orwell since he is one (1) of the great writers
 20  about how the individual may become lost in -- in the
 21  wake of mass interests.
 22                 And in a democratic society, it's clear
 23  under our law that the interests of individuals directly
 24  involved in public proceedings can also never be
 25  forgotten, and reputation is of vital importance, and it

26

  1  is reputation that is often put at risk in public
  2  inquiries in particular.
  3                 Reputation is -- is so important in our
  4  society because it is closely linked to the building of
  5  people to participate in society itself.  And secondly,
  6  there is respect for the emotional security, the dignity
  7  of people involved in a -- in a process, which needs to
  8  be respected.
  9                 And there can be circumstances where a
 10  public process may intrude upon areas of life, of
 11  individual life, where there is a reasonable expectation
 12  of privacy, and that has to be considered too.
 13                 And third, after freedom of expression and
 14  individual interest, one has to consider the integrity of
 15  a process.  And it is indeed clear, and I think it's been
 16  said once today, that the principle that public
 17  proceedings should generally be [sic] open exists so that
 18  justice will be done and can be seen to be done.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (whispers in unison): “Seen to be done, that’s right.”

 19                 An open process allows the public to
 20  scrutinize and, if they see fit, to criticize the process
 21  and its participants.  It allows the public also to be
 22  assured about the fair conduct of the process because
 23  they can see it for themselves.
 24                 Now that being said, a public inquiry is
 25  not a public scrum.  First, it is a legal process.  It's

27

  1  appropriate for the Commission to take appropriate steps
  2  to ensure suitable decorum of the proceedings, a suitable
  3  tone.
  4                 Second, witnesses must be respected as
  5  individuals and not be subjected to undue intrusions or,
  6  at worst, intimidation.
  7                 Third, as it is a legal process there is
  8  going to be much that occurs in the hearing room that is
  9  properly private.  There will be written communications
 10  or oral communications which -- among counsel that are
 11  privileged.
 12                 There will be a lawyer's documentary work
 13  product that is also properly confidential.  And any
 14  inadvertent or even intentional intrusion upon those --
 15  those rights of confidentiality should be prevented.
 16                 So those, in my submission, are three (3)
 17  general areas of considerations that have to be weighed
 18  in the balance, and -- and, of course, in this area what
 19  -- what the Supreme Court has said repeatedly is that one
 20  must try to give a reasonably equal weight to all of
 21  those values and not -- not privilege some over -- over
 22  others.
 23                 And in -- in my submission, I -- I would
 24  suggest -- I would suggest that as a -- as a
 25  recommendation perhaps that -- that it would be an

28

  1  appropriate balancing of these principles if persons
  2  could be allowed access to a single video feed, which I
  3  understand can be prepared, an unaltered videotape of the
  4  proceedings, to use words that have been used with you
  5  this morning, so that not only established media
  6  organizations but individuals acting responsibly can
  7  exercise their appropriate rights of freedom of
  8  expression.
  9                 With respect to the cameras, I would
 10  suggest that it will be consistent with decorum for --
 11  for there only to be one (1) video camera, one (1) video
 12  feed, and that there should not be roaming video cameras
 13  or roaming audio devices in the courtroom.  There may, on
 14  occasion, be times in a public inquiry when -- when any -
 15  - any reporter, any member of the media, will be allowed
 16  to take photographs for a brief time and it should be one
 17  (1) rule for all in my -- my submission.
 18                 And with respect to audio recording, there
 19  is a precedent for allowing unobtrusive audio recording
 20  in courtrooms.  One (1) solution that might be adopted
 21  there that would respect confidentiality interests would
 22  be that if audio recording were to be allowed, it would
 23  be -- to be from a stationary position and should be at a
 24  distance, a reasonable distance, away from counsel tables
 25  to avoid any inadvertent intrusion upon matters of

29

  1  confidentiality.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (whispers): “This guy is good.”

  2                 So those are the suggestions I would make
  3  in light of the balancing of those factors.  And I -- I
  4  suggest also that it would be appropriate for -- for the
  5  Commission to -- in -- in seeking to provide appropriate
  6  scope for free expression is to -- it would be helpful to
  7  remind members of nonprofessional media -- who -- who may
  8  be more or less experienced in these matters, I'm not
  9  sure -- but it may be appropriate to remind them that in
 10  the modern law of reporting on proceedings such as this,
 11  there are important limitations upon what people can say
 12  properly.
 13                 There is a civil liability in defamation
 14  which can result in matters of -- in statements of
 15  opinion or comment.  In matters of public interest,
 16  they'll be broadly protected as long as they are based on
 17  fact and made without malice.  But if they are not based
 18  on fact and not made without malice, those expressions of
 19  opinion or comment can lead to civil liability.
 20                 And, similarly -- similarly, statements of
 21  fact on matters of public interest are protected as long
 22  as they are responsibly published, and in this sort of
 23  situation [cell phone rings] -- I beg your pardon.
 24                 In this sort of situation, it is very
 25  important to bear in mind that the legal protection for

30

  1  reports of public proceedings has had a fundamental
  2  principle, which is, that those reports of public
  3  proceedings must be fair and accurate [cell phone rings again]. They must be
  4  balanced.  Can you put that somewhere for me, please? They must be -- be balanced.  They must
  5  reflect both sides of an issue.  If someone is going to -
  6  - whether they're a large organization or a single
  7  individual, if they're going to report an allegation,
  8  they have to identify it as an allegation.  If it is
  9  disputed, or if it may be disputed, they have to say
 10  that.  They have to be fair.
 11                 And there -- there's no licence for
 12  biassed reporting.  If someone engages in biassed
 13  reporting to the public because of an axe to grind or --
 14  or a -- a malicious intent, that falls outside the law.
 15                 And so -- and, as well, one has to bear in
 16  mind in the age of the Internet, the audience for the --
 17  the Internet in a -- in a particular matter may, in fact,
 18  be very small, but it is always potentially very large.
 19  And if we have an -- an example of an Internet --
 20  Internet publication that somehow becomes terribly
 21  popular, or goes viral in the popular term, the damage,
 22  if it is a wrongful publication, can be very significant.
 23                 So, in light of all of that, I would
 24  suggest -- I put it -- I'd have to put an asterisk on the
 25  recommendations I -- I submitted previously.  I would

31

  1  suggest that the Commission reserve a discretion to deny
  2  any reporter, organized or not, in the -- in the business
  3  sense, access to the video feed if that were to be abused
  4  in any future interest.
  5                 And so, subject to any questions you may
  6  have, Sir, those are essentially my submissions.
  7                 COMMISSIONER DOUGLAS CUNNINGHAM:   Thank
  8  you, Mr. Downard.
  9                 Does any other... audio fade...

Court transcript cut-and-pasted from Mississauga Judicial Inquiry website and modified as a video transcript.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

The Mississauga Muse at the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry

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Peter Downard (Lawyer/media specialist) addresses Mississauga Judicial Inquiry –On: citizen journalism

April 24th, 2010  

Apologies all.

It took far too long to post media specialist lawyer, Peter Downard’s excellent presentation on citizen-journalism which he gave at the April 12, 2010 Mississauga Judicial Inquiry hearing. Here it is, complete with court/video transcript.

Video: Peter Downard (Lawyer/media specialist) addresses Mississauga Judicial Inquiry –On: citizen journalism

Click here to go directly to the clip on MISSISSAUGAWATCH Vimeo

COURT/VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

 23                 MR. WILLIAM MCDOWELL:  I would ask that we
 24  now hear from Mr. Peter Downard who's here acting as
 25  amicus on this suite of media issues.

24

  1                 COMMISSIONER DOUGLAS CUNNINGHAM:   Thank
  2  you.  Mr. Downard, thank you very much for assisting us.
  3
  4  SUBMISSIONS BY MR. PETER DOWNARD:
  5                 MR. PETER DOWNARD:   I hope I can,
  6  Commissioner.  Thank you.  Good morning.
  7                 Commissioner, the -- the law in this area
  8  primarily involving the openness of public proceedings
  9  has been subject to much careful review and analysis in
 10  the twenty-five (25) years, since the -- the courts have
 11  been rethinking issues of freedom of expression and
 12  public access to -- to justice under the Charter.
 13                 And I think it's fair to say that, in
 14  summary, the jurisprudence identifies that in such cases
 15  there are, essentially, three types of interests that
 16  have to be balanced in any particular situation.
 17                 Those are, first, the interests in freedom
 18  of expression; second, the legitimate individual
 19  interests of those directly involved in the process; and
 20  third, the integrity of the process itself.
 21                 And if I may first speak to the subject of
 22  freedom of expression briefly.  It is very clear that
 23  freedom of expression in our democracy includes the
 24  freedom to know what is going on in public proceedings
 25  and to communicate with others about it.  And to be able

25

  1  to communicate about that, it is necessary for there to
  2  be access to the proceeding.
  3                 Now, the reality is that the public at
  4  large necessarily depends on reporters to obtain that
  5  access for them and to re -- report what goes on to them
  6  because they just can't do it for themselves.
  7                 And in the modern world it is clear that
  8  access to means of mass communication has been extended
  9  far beyond the limits of traditional media organizations.
 10  To -- it has [correction: is] extended to -- to bloggers, to users of --
 11  of social media, the people who have websites.  And if
 12  freedom of expression is to be truly democratic and alive
 13  in the modern world, it must give way to their interests
 14  too.
 15                 Now next, though, I turn to the individual
 16  interests that have to be balanced in this sort of a
 17  situation.  And it was very interesting to -- to hear the
 18  references to 1984 in the submissions today and -- and
 19  the great Orwell since he is one (1) of the great writers
 20  about how the individual may become lost in -- in the
 21  wake of mass interests.
 22                 And in a democratic society, it's clear
 23  under our law that the interests of individuals directly
 24  involved in public proceedings can also never be
 25  forgotten, and reputation is of vital importance, and it

26

  1  is reputation that is often put at risk in public
  2  inquiries in particular.
  3                 Reputation is -- is so important in our
  4  society because it is closely linked to the building of
  5  people to participate in society itself.  And secondly,
  6  there is respect for the emotional security, the dignity
  7  of people involved in a -- in a process, which needs to
  8  be respected.
  9                 And there can be circumstances where a
 10  public process may intrude upon areas of life, of
 11  individual life, where there is a reasonable expectation
 12  of privacy, and that has to be considered too.
 13                 And third, after freedom of expression and
 14  individual interest, one has to consider the integrity of
 15  a process.  And it is indeed clear, and I think it's been
 16  said once today, that the principle that public
 17  proceedings should generally be [sic] open exists so that
 18  justice will be done and can be seen to be done.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (whispers in unison): “Seen to be done, that’s right.”

 19                 An open process allows the public to
 20  scrutinize and, if they see fit, to criticize the process
 21  and its participants.  It allows the public also to be
 22  assured about the fair conduct of the process because
 23  they can see it for themselves.
 24                 Now that being said, a public inquiry is
 25  not a public scrum.  First, it is a legal process.  It's

27

  1  appropriate for the Commission to take appropriate steps
  2  to ensure suitable decorum of the proceedings, a suitable
  3  tone.
  4                 Second, witnesses must be respected as
  5  individuals and not be subjected to undue intrusions or,
  6  at worst, intimidation.
  7                 Third, as it is a legal process there is
  8  going to be much that occurs in the hearing room that is
  9  properly private.  There will be written communications
 10  or oral communications which -- among counsel that are
 11  privileged.
 12                 There will be a lawyer's documentary work
 13  product that is also properly confidential.  And any
 14  inadvertent or even intentional intrusion upon those --
 15  those rights of confidentiality should be prevented.
 16                 So those, in my submission, are three (3)
 17  general areas of considerations that have to be weighed
 18  in the balance, and -- and, of course, in this area what
 19  -- what the Supreme Court has said repeatedly is that one
 20  must try to give a reasonably equal weight to all of
 21  those values and not -- not privilege some over -- over
 22  others.
 23                 And in -- in my submission, I -- I would
 24  suggest -- I would suggest that as a -- as a
 25  recommendation perhaps that -- that it would be an

28

  1  appropriate balancing of these principles if persons
  2  could be allowed access to a single video feed, which I
  3  understand can be prepared, an unaltered videotape of the
  4  proceedings, to use words that have been used with you
  5  this morning, so that not only established media
  6  organizations but individuals acting responsibly can
  7  exercise their appropriate rights of freedom of
  8  expression.
  9                 With respect to the cameras, I would
 10  suggest that it will be consistent with decorum for --
 11  for there only to be one (1) video camera, one (1) video
 12  feed, and that there should not be roaming video cameras
 13  or roaming audio devices in the courtroom.  There may, on
 14  occasion, be times in a public inquiry when -- when any -
 15  - any reporter, any member of the media, will be allowed
 16  to take photographs for a brief time and it should be one
 17  (1) rule for all in my -- my submission.
 18                 And with respect to audio recording, there
 19  is a precedent for allowing unobtrusive audio recording
 20  in courtrooms.  One (1) solution that might be adopted
 21  there that would respect confidentiality interests would
 22  be that if audio recording were to be allowed, it would
 23  be -- to be from a stationary position and should be at a
 24  distance, a reasonable distance, away from counsel tables
 25  to avoid any inadvertent intrusion upon matters of

29

  1  confidentiality.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (whispers): “This guy is good.”

  2                 So those are the suggestions I would make
  3  in light of the balancing of those factors.  And I -- I
  4  suggest also that it would be appropriate for -- for the
  5  Commission to -- in -- in seeking to provide appropriate
  6  scope for free expression is to -- it would be helpful to
  7  remind members of nonprofessional media -- who -- who may
  8  be more or less experienced in these matters, I'm not
  9  sure -- but it may be appropriate to remind them that in
 10  the modern law of reporting on proceedings such as this,
 11  there are important limitations upon what people can say
 12  properly.
 13                 There is a civil liability in defamation
 14  which can result in matters of -- in statements of
 15  opinion or comment.  In matters of public interest,
 16  they'll be broadly protected as long as they are based on
 17  fact and made without malice.  But if they are not based
 18  on fact and not made without malice, those expressions of
 19  opinion or comment can lead to civil liability.
 20                 And, similarly -- similarly, statements of
 21  fact on matters of public interest are protected as long
 22  as they are responsibly published, and in this sort of
 23  situation [cell phone rings] -- I beg your pardon.
 24                 In this sort of situation, it is very
 25  important to bear in mind that the legal protection for

30

  1  reports of public proceedings has had a fundamental
  2  principle, which is, that those reports of public
  3  proceedings must be fair and accurate [cell phone rings again]. They must be
  4  balanced.  Can you put that somewhere for me, please? They must be -- be balanced.  They must
  5  reflect both sides of an issue.  If someone is going to -
  6  - whether they're a large organization or a single
  7  individual, if they're going to report an allegation,
  8  they have to identify it as an allegation.  If it is
  9  disputed, or if it may be disputed, they have to say
 10  that.  They have to be fair.
 11                 And there -- there's no licence for
 12  biassed reporting.  If someone engages in biassed
 13  reporting to the public because of an axe to grind or --
 14  or a -- a malicious intent, that falls outside the law.
 15                 And so -- and, as well, one has to bear in
 16  mind in the age of the Internet, the audience for the --
 17  the Internet in a -- in a particular matter may, in fact,
 18  be very small, but it is always potentially very large.
 19  And if we have an -- an example of an Internet --
 20  Internet publication that somehow becomes terribly
 21  popular, or goes viral in the popular term, the damage,
 22  if it is a wrongful publication, can be very significant.
 23                 So, in light of all of that, I would
 24  suggest -- I put it -- I'd have to put an asterisk on the
 25  recommendations I -- I submitted previously.  I would

31

  1  suggest that the Commission reserve a discretion to deny
  2  any reporter, organized or not, in the -- in the business
  3  sense, access to the video feed if that were to be abused
  4  in any future interest.
  5                 And so, subject to any questions you may
  6  have, Sir, those are essentially my submissions.
  7                 COMMISSIONER DOUGLAS CUNNINGHAM:   Thank
  8  you, Mr. Downard.
  9                 Does any other... audio fade...

Court transcript cut-and-pasted from Mississauga Judicial Inquiry website and modified as a video transcript.

Just wish to highlight Mr. Downard’s words:

It is very clear that freedom of expression in our democracy includes the
freedom to know what is going on in public proceedings and to communicate with others about it.  And to
be able to communicate about that, it is necessary for there to be access to the proceeding. Now, the reality
is that the public at large necessarily depends on reporters to obtain that access for them and to re -- report
what goes on to them because they just can't do it for themselves.

The Reality is that throughout my Judicial Inquiry submission, I blasted with:

For the record, there are no media in MYTHissauga… As for MYTHissauga’s only newspaper? Coverage of City Hall is a joke.

And boy, did the Mississauga News ever prove that coverage of their Mississauga Judicial Inquiry is an even worse joke. In their article that was supposed to cover citizen journalists’ access to media, the Mississauga News chose as their title, ‘Layers’ of land deal probed.

And what did the Mississauga News write about my appearance and that of Donald Barber?

“Both made their cases today, arguing freedom of expression.”

No, I argued that “there are no media in MYTHissauga… As for MYTHissauga’s only newspaper? Coverage of City Hall is a joke.” I also said, “Mississauga accredited media do not respect history enough to be Guardians of the Truth. As far as reporters at the National level, well… some of them are little more than stenographers.”

What I didn’t say to Commissioner Cunningham is that citizen-Bloggers can make better journalists than the paid crowd as I didn’t want to come off sounding arrogant and/or obnoxious.

I am saying that now: citizen-Bloggers can make better journalists than the paid crowd… and I submit the local media article ‘Layers’ of land deal probed as evidence once again that it’s tough to have Freedom of Expression when citizenry is hobbled by The Missing News.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

The Mississauga Muse at the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry

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PEEL YOUTH VIOLENCE PREVENTION NETWORK’s 3rd ANNIVERSARY RAP –with Mississauga graffiti, uh-huh

April 23rd, 2010  

On March 31, 2007 the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network held its inaugural meeting inside Mississauga Council Chambers. I was there and signed up for the Network’s Education and Policy Working Group. After all, Policy is Everything.  If the Policies are poor, or poorly implemented, guaranteed there’s a lot of up and down and precious little forward happening.

One of the best summaries certainly that I’ve ever heard regarding youth violence prevention came from Andrew King, Pastor of the Seventh Day Adventist Church when he was asked why youth don’t come to these youth meetings. He said:

..all I can say is of all the panels I sit on the first question that is asked is ‘Where are the young people? We are talking about them but they’re not with us.’ Young people are very frustrated because there’s a lot of panels Oh the reports that are written about all the money we gotta spend!’ and they’re very frustrated with the system right now. That’s why they don’t come to a lot of these things because the truth is because they don’t believe in what’s happening.

Having observed Safe City Mississauga, the Mississauga Youth Plan and Mississauga’s contribution to the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network, there’s good reason why youth shouldn’t believe in what’s happening. These youth initiatives appear to exist to create the illusion that our public institutions are doing something progressively cutting-edge and worthy of modeling in other municipalities all over Canada.

And politicians like Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito and her gushy “phenomenal”s are heady, hypocritical contributors to the Roots of Youth Violence.

So to acknowledge the third anniversary of the Peel Youth Violence Inauguration meeting, I offer this video featuring Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, and Brampton Councillor Gael Miles (chair of the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network).

It also highlights Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito (chair of Safe City Mississauga and co-chair of the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network), who is simply “absolutely phenomenal” in her assessment of Reality.

As always, a warning. Much of the graffiti in this video is HIGHLY OFFENSIVE to viewers (but not as offensive as the politicians.)

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: WARNING! HIGHLY OFFENSIVE MATERIAL (but not as offensive as the politicians) (3:55 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

PREMIER DALTON MCGUINTY “Getting to The Roots of Youth Violence” :

Ontario must and will assume its proper responsibility. I say that as Premier, of course, but I feel it most of all as a parent. Thank you.

CROSS ZOOM

VISUALS MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI
Music:
Caspian & Grafhic – Matrix Shit

Yeah, Cas beyond Grafhic.
Yeah, y’all wanna roll wid us?
Jump in. Let’s go.

Yeah, Cas beyond
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic.
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

This world we live in is a devilish mess
We got homeless people and terrorist threats
So it’s what the homefront
Or the front lines, God help us

We’re confused what to build
Bum shelters or bomb shelters

Cas beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Cas beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Oh so Matrix Shit, uh

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA and the (delusional) PEEL YOUTH VIOLENCE PREVENTION

BRAMPTON COUNCILLOR GAEL MILES (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

Less than two years later, we have over a hundred individuals involved in working on the youth violence and gang strategy. Absolutely phenomenal.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.  As Gael said, I think we’re all amazed –those of us on the Committee, at the success and how quickly we’ve been successful over the past two years.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

And she said it is due to the hard work of the staff —we have Dorothy and the other Health Department staff, that have just been absolutely phenomenal.

The organizations’ feedback which we get individually and collectively from the organizations is absolutely phenomenal.

We have some excellent, absolutely phenomenal programs and services that are out there. But by forming this network we have just expanded the impact of every single one of those organizations.

And I am just so proud to have been part of this and it’s just a naturally phenomenal program.

[CROSS ZOOM switch to black and white]

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

And thank you, members of Council, for endorsing the Youth Charter and for endorsing the resolution today that it will be hung in all buildings. And I don’t think there will be one public building in the entire Region of Peel that won’t have this Youth Charter in it after this week.

[CROSS FADE switch to back to colour]

Including, Ron, you still hear? We’re meeting with Ron next week, so it’ll be hanging in the Mississauga News office—

(former) MISSISSAUGA NEWS PUBLISHER, Ron Lenyk (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

For sure.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

—as well.

[CROSS ZOOM]

VISUALS MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Cas’ beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm…

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

P.S. And guess where else the Peel Youth Charter is hanging?

"PEEL YOUTH CHARTER at City of Mississauga Facilities and Property Management (aka Mississauga Corporate Security) April 16 2010

"MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI (new at site) April 21" "2010 F**** THE SYSTEM" (censored version)

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GRAFFITI in MISSISSAUGA: Preliminary Report (April 19, 2009 – April 19, 2010) baseline

April 20th, 2010  

GRAFFITI in MISSISSAUGA: Preliminary Report (April 19, 2009 – April 19, 2010) baseline

On April 19, 2009, we conducted our first Brampton/Mississauga graffiti survey and documented several study sites many times throughout the year. Since then we’ve photographed and videotaped Brampton/Mississauga graffiti/tagging “expressions” right up to yesterday, April 19, 2010 –the first anniversary of our two-year study.

We will state up front that we have never nor will we ever report graffiti to authorities. For one thing we are documenting how long graffiti stays up. For another, some of the graffiti we’ve seen is, at least in our opinion, Art! As in real Art, Art.

GRAFFITI MAP MISSISSAUGA (PEEL POVERTY, SOCIAL RISK INDEX MAP)

For the larger original (3157 x 2382) version, please click here.

We recognize that there is a “Mississauga graffiti wall” but because of difficulty accessing this area, it is not included in our study.

When we originally started out on this research project, we’d expected to find a strong correlation between high-activity graffiti locations and High Risk Social Index neighbourhoods. While that is true to some extent, it is not always the case. For example, our greatest surprise was the lack of significant graffiti activity in Malton.

Another surprise was the lack of graffiti on Mississauga school walls (Peel and Dufferin-Peel schools were surveyed). A (very) few schools did attract considerable graffiti activity based on the amount of paint patches and scrubbed brick but it’s clear that such events are rare for the majority of Mississauga schools that we examined. We believe that lack of graffiti speaks well for both the students and school faculty.

There have been times when we’ve come upon new graffiti but did not have a camera. We determined to return the next day to photograph it only to find the material already painted over.  And yes, removal can happen that quickly. That said, there were also significant, highly-visible graffiti sites we discovered back in April 2009 that are still around today.

Regarding incidents of graffiti, Mississauga has little! Should you take a drive around Hamilton for your own quick survey, you will see a dramatic difference between graffiti expression in that city compared to here. There’s a startling difference in the nature of graffiti messages as well. Downtown Hamilton has a shocking amount of anti-police graffiti, some of it sprayed in unambiguous one-foot-high “F*** THE POLICE” black letters in that city’s parks.

By contrast, we’ve only managed to document six anti-police graffiti messages since April 19, 2009—one of which was in Brampton. In addition, Peel Regional Police graffiti records (which they generously provided through Freedom of Information with all fees waived) show a couple more anti-police examples and are not included in this report.

GRAFFITI MAP MISSISSAUGA: ANTI-POLICE MESSAGES (PEEL POVERTY, SOCIAL RISK INDEX MAP)

For the larger original (1000 x 1719) version, please click here.

Does anti-police graffiti reflect the relationship between police and the community? We’re beginning to think so.

Here is what one former graffiti artist (Mississauga-based) had to say about police:

“you are absolutely right about graffiti being defined as unauthorized…and i respect the police… i havent gone out painting in a under a year because of the police haha.” [sic]

You will hear more from this young man because he’s consented to an interview. (Seems he has something to say to the politicians…)

Next, this first year graffiti data represents a kind of baseline. We have yet to do the analysis (ie: percentages) but we’re interested in trends of anti-police graffiti messages as well as Hate/Bias motivated. For example we’ve documented considerably more of the latter and fear such under-rumblings promise only to get worse. You know, the predictable consequences of “What happens when nothing happens?”

In the June 30, 2009 article, Youth Plan ready for implementation,  the Mississauga News states that Mayor Hazel McCallion pointed out that only an estimated two per cent of young people frequently get into trouble.

The paper then quoted McCallion as saying, “We should concentrate on the 98 per cent that are good youth,” as part of the City’s new Mississauga Youth Plan. Take it from us, the City of Mississauga’s “new” plan is just like the old one. The 2 per cent who need government most are regarded as nuisances and non-conforming to Corporate objectives of running the city like a business. Given their high-maintenance proclivities, the “bad” 2 per cent youth are not good for business or the City’s Bottom Line.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH is concentrating on the “bad” 2 per cent and we believe that graffiti is an alternate voice that must be heeded in order to document what DOESN’T get communicated to local public institutions. The perceptive will appreciate why.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA (April 13 2010)

And the signs said the words of the prophets
Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls
And whispered in the sounds of silence

The Sound of Silence: Simon and Garfunkel

For more on graffiti in Mississauga, please check out: www.mississaugawatch.ca/blog/?s=GRAFFITI

Last, a repeat graffiti video shown in yesterday’s Blog containing some of the graffiti shown here in this report.

Again, a reminder. Much of the graffiti in this video is HIGHLY OFFENSIVE to viewers.

Video: GRAFFITI TRUTH: “BURN THAT F***ER TO THE GROUND IF THEY DON’T LOVE YOU LIKE THEY SHOULD” (5:24 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Signed,
MISSISSAUGAWATCH
(April 20, 2010)

UPDATE, April 21, 2010 BEGINS (SUPPORT IMAGES) :

“some of the graffiti we’ve seen is, at least in our opinion, Art! As in real Art, Art.”

"GRAFFITI as ART" "MISSISSAUGA (COOKSVILLE)  GRAFFITI-ARTIST, "WIZER"

“We determined to return the next day to photograph it only to find the material already painted over.  And yes, removal can happen that quickly.” Example. There on April 19, 2010, gone by April 21st.

MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI: ANTI POLICE MESSAGE ERASED WITHIN 24 HOURS.

* Please note: It has not escaped us that Brampton and Mississauga have an aggressive graffiti removal service whereas City of Hamilton may be cash-strapped or have other priorities. Regardless, it’s important to document the graffiti messages in order to track changes over time. There’s definitely a culture there!

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: DOCUMENTING CHANGES "niggahs BLEED"

This graffiti site has remained stable since we first discovered it back on April 27, 2009. We revisited on March 29, 2010 and discovered new tags and since that visit, a green fist appears beside graffiti that had been sprayed over and “niggaz BLEED” has been added as well as some other material.

Thought I’d share this drive-through of this study site on March 29, 2010 and comparative from April 27, 2009 for researchers and graffiti-types.  It’s interesting to compare the video footage to today’s images (above). Again, a reminder, please don’t view this video if you have a problem with Reality (feel free to head off to mississauga.ca instead and Pretend Positive.)

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA (Site Comparison: April 27, 2009 and March 29, 2010) RESEARCH (2:40 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

UPDATE ENDS.

Signed,
MISSISSAUGAWATCH
(April 21, 2010)

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Brampton/Mississauga graffiti research: comparative graffiti/tagging photographs (April 19, 2009 and April 19, 2010)

April 19th, 2010  

Today is April 19, 2010, and to mark the first anniversary of our two-year comparative study of graffiti and tagging, here is a comparative as promised. I went to my April 19, 2009, graffiti records and then headed out to revisit each location and document the changes, if any.

GRAFFITI and TAGGING MISSISSAUGA and BRAMPTON (comparative photos April 19, 2009 and today, April 19, 2010)


Street sign tagging, Malton (Mississauga). A year gone by and no change.

GRAFFITI, MALTON, MISSISSAUGA "HELLRAZORS"

Again, Malton, Mississauga, “HELLRAZORS”. A year gone by, tagging relatively stable.

GRAFFITI and TAGGING, BRAMPTON, (comparative April 19, 2009 and April 19, 2010)

GRAFFITI/TAGGING, Brampton. This wall was cleaned up fairly quickly back in 2009. The tags and graffiti along the railway tracks are faded from sun and weather. This site contained “FTP” which a year ago, I concluded were someone’s initials. Nope. “FTP” is shortform for “F*** the Police”.

MISSISSAUGA bridge Tagging and partial erase (comparison April 19, 2009 and April 19, 2010)

Mississauga bridge, shows partial erase of graffiti with this red tagging left untouched. The water levels were low enough this time for me to venture well underneath the bridge and document other examples of graffiti. Unfortunately, a graffiti art piece created by a talented practiced hand was erased along with the junk. All I can say is I’m glad I photographed it prior to it being erased.

I’ve mentioned on several other occasions just how little anti-police graffiti there is in either Brampton or Mississauga. I believe it speaks well of Peel Police. Perhaps readers would be surprised just how many graffiti artists think highly of police.

Just the other day I received an email from a former graffiti artist who said, “you are absolutely right about graffiti being defined as unauthorized…and i respect the police… i havent gone out painting in a under a year because of the police haha.” [sic]

His “haha” cracked me up. I’ve since sought clarification. Seems Peel Police are quite good at frustrating the creative expression of local taggers and graffiti artists. But—in a fair way. (I keep thinking about that Warner Bros cartoon with Wiley E. Coyote and that cool ever-vigilant sheep dog (see MISSISSAUGAWATCH banner at top of this page)

It’s been last June since I’ve seen any new anti-police graffiti but I sure saw a new one today! And photographed it.

No ambiguity in this message sprayed on the window of a Mississauga school.

MISSISSAUGA SCHOOL ANTI-POLICE TAG (APRIL 19, 2010)

OK. So Peel Police aren’t universally appreciated….

Last. Just want to share this graffiti video that features a toxic mix of the Pretend Safe City MYTHissauga, the Pretend of Dalton McGuinty’s announcement of the McMurtry/Curling Roots of Youth Violence report and by far the worst of all —the Pretend of Mississauga Chair of Safe City MYTHissauga Chair Pat Saito gushing up her best “amazing”s and “phenomenal”s as she declares the “phenomenal” success of the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network.  There’s even Hazel McCallion and Mississauga Corporate Security! Yes, this video HAS IT ALL!

But mostly there’s graffiti documented in Brampton and Mississauga from April 19, 2009 to January 2010 —some of which appears here. Again, a reminder. Much of the graffiti in this video is HIGHLY OFFENSIVE. But the politicians’ fakery is much, much worse! As in EXTREMELY OFFENSIVE!

Video: GRAFFITI TRUTH: “BURN THAT F***ER TO THE GROUND IF THEY DON’T LOVE YOU LIKE THEY SHOULD” (5:24 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

“I think that we’re all amazed, those of us on the Committee, at the success and how quickly we have been successful over the past two years.”

—Councillor Pat Saito on the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network   (October 25, 2007)

“GET  FRIKKIN’ **REAL** WOMAN!”

—Witness/Observer/Researcher of Mississauga municipal governance and hypocrisy (April 19, 2010)

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

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Mississauga Graffiti Survey reveals, “If you look for beer bottles and hard liquor, we collect them.”

April 4th, 2010  

Today we provide video of this Mississauga graffiti site.

"GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: GANG SYMBOLS: New study site discovered March 30" "2010 (location undisclosed: baseline)"

It was discovered March 30, 2010 although there’s considerable evidence that it’s been around for some time. I shot pics and video.

When I videotape I also provide commentary, not just for viewers who might ultimately see the material but more often than not for myself as “field notes”.

I’d been commenting on the amount of litter, then mentioned that at least there were no beer bottles or hard liquor about.

A resident of the area overheard me and not just explained why there were no bottles, but also provided insight into the difficult lives of people living here.

I was reminded of Chair Kolb’s March 28, 2008 warning:

If we don’t get to the word, “integration” —how these communities are all going to integrate, maybe not in our time here soon, but maybe in his children’s time. there will be a big issue in this Region.

And you know what? Maybe I’m really off-base here but what my images/videotapes are telling me is the greatest “integration” issue this area has is Poverty —while the indescribably-obscenely-rich live just four and a half minutes away.

So. Video. Then as usual  —the video transcript.

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: New study site discovered March 30, 2010 (location undisclosed: baseline) 2:56 min

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: New study site discovered March 30, 2010 (location undisclosed: baseline)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 31, 2010)

Just want to document a new graffiti site that I discovered just yesterday.

I videotaped it yesterday but I also discovered that when reviewing it when I wanted to post it, there was far too much —too many hints of where this location is. And one thing that I don’t want to do is reveal the location of these graffiti sites. So.

[CROSS FADE]

We have, actually here if you look is the word N*****. I’m not even sure if it’s spelled right. Going down. “GOONIEZ”.

And yesterday, what I had done was I had made a commentary about how there’s a lot of litter down here.

[DIP TO WHITE]

But I’d also said, well at least there’s not, you know, alcohol, or like beer, or hard liquor. And somebody was actually hearing me make that comment and she said—

[CLOCK WIPE]

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

(laughs) If you look for beer bottles or hard liquor, we collect them. (laughs).

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh!

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

(laughs) We collect this stuff.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh! So are you saying that when there’s bottles here, people collect the bottles to return them?

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh, sure. I do all the time!

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh, do you? Oh, OK.

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

(laughs)

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh, thank you for telling me.

[DIP TO WHITE]

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

But I collect this stuff all the time —anything I can bring back to the store. And I’m not the only one. There’s always people collecting cans and bottles.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Oh,OK.

Thank you for telling me.

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

(laughs)

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

Thank you.

RESIDENT’S VOICE DISTORTED FOR PRIVACY (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 30, 2010)

You’re welcome.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (at new Mississauga graffiti site, March 31, 2010)

So apparently there are people who collect bottles and stuff like that from around here in order to make extra money to get by.

[DIP TO WHITE]

We have —just get in there closer.

This is the crown with the three prongs. And we saw that at another site that I document.

And then you have “S-WAY”

[CROSS FADE]

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB (Peel Regional Council, March 28, 2008):

It’s very interesting to listen to your presentation this morning cuz I had a young gentleman in to see me yesterday, that [sic] here to convince me that we need to get away from the word “multiculture” and we need to get to the word “integration”.

If we don’t get to the word, “integration” —how these communities are all going to integrate, maybe not in our time here soon, but maybe in his children’s time. there will be a big issue in this Region.

[CROSS FADE to MISSISSAUGAWATCH LOGO]

So. What happens if nothing happens?

"HAZEL MCCALLION QUOTE "What happens if nothing happens?"

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" (undisclosed location) photographed March 30, 2010

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL "BOMBED" (MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL MATERIAL courtesy Peel Regional Police through Freedom of Information)

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

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Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT

April 2nd, 2010  

Here, as promised, is video of the 2009 Hate/Bias motivated Crime report presented at the Peel Police Services Board meeting on March 26, 2010.

And as usual, the video transcript.

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT10:31 min

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT 10:31 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE CHIEF, MICHAEL METCALF:

Mr. Chairman, [inaudible] in charge of our Diversity Unit, so without any further introduction, Chris, welcome. Thank you.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB:

It’s item #27. Now would you like to make some comments on the report, sir?

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE DIVERSITY RELATIONS UNIT:

Yes, Mr. Chairman. Good morning.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB:

Good morning.

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE DIVERSITY RELATIONS UNIT:

I’d just like to take the time to present the details contained within the 2009 Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report.

The Hate/Bias Motivated Crimes are monitored and reviewed by the Diversity Relations Unit. From those occurrences, the Unit has prepared this report for you.

In 2009, there were 95 Hate/Bias Motivated Crimes reported and investigated by Peel Regional Police. This is a significant increase from the 2008 numbers when there were 37 reported crimes.

When the Diversity Relations Unit reviewed the occurrences and analyzed the evidence, it is worth noting that in more than half the occurrences, the victim had no idea why there were the target of the specific Hate-motivated crime.

Their ethnicity, religion, race or sexual persuasion did not coincide with the Hate-motivated crime. During 2009, five investigations resulted in arrests and the occurrence being solved.

The report contains diagrams and graphs to assist in evaluating the information.

The first diagram, located on page 2 of the report identifies the fact that most of the occurrences —66 to be exact, are Mischiefs or damaged property occurrences such as graffiti. This has been consistent over the past four years.

The Hate-motivated crimes are not isolated to specific areas within the region but fairly evenly distributed throughout all of the divisions.

The Diversity Relations Unit have [sic] tracked Hate-motivated crimes since 2006. The occurrences have fluctuated during those four years with 71 occurrences in 2006, 47 in 2007, 37 in 2008 and then for last year we had 95.

Explanations and reasons for the increase have been researched and the occurrences will continue to be closely scrutinized to ensure that they are investigated in great detail.

But we believe that some of the increase can be attributed to the proactive efforts of the Police Service within our diverse community that we serve. The Diversity Relations Unit educates every front line officer on the recognizing and investigating Hate-motivated crime.

They also educate ethnic community agencies —groups on the importance of reporting such crimes.

As we hire officers that reflect the community we believe that it enhances our ability to detect Hate-motivated crime better.

The Diversity Relations Unit is building strong relationships and trust within our communities through events such as The Race Against Racism, the Diversity Basketball Tournament and our participation in the Pride Parade each year.

We have also introduced a Lesbian/Gay hotline to encourage our Gay Community [to] report crime directed at them. Just this year we’ve enhanced that service by adding an email address that the gay community can use to report incidents or seek help from the Diversity Relations Unit or the Police Service.

The Diversity Relations Unit also participates in community programs speaking to newcomers that come to Canada. They distribute material in a variety of different languages and again ensuring that our new residents understand that they can trust policing in Canada.

And that summarizes the contents of the report.

[TRANSCRIPT ENDS WITH THANKS TO PEEL POLICE]

And ah, what the heck. Might as well serve this one up.

You know… Just me documenting “What happens if nothing happens?”

WARNING! HIGHLY OFFENSIVE VIDEO! Dedicated to Safe City Mississauga.

Video: GRAFFITI TRUTH: “BURN THAT F***ER TO THE GROUND IF THEY DON’T LOVE YOU LIKE THEY SHOULD” 5:24 min

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

GRAFFITI  "MISSISSAUGA CIVIC CENTRE" "HATE/BIAS GRAFFITI  (photographed March 24, 2010)

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MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) Off the Cuff Hate Crime/Gang REPORT PART 2

April 2nd, 2010  

This time Part 2  —the transcript of this video report —uploaded to YouTube just prior to the Hate Crime/graffiti data released by the Peel Police Services Board at their Friday, March 26, 2010 meeting.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA "HATE CRIME" "JULY 29" 2009 "ERIN MILLS PARKWAY" "WHITE POWER" "NIGGER" PERMISSION WALL"

Rather than repeat the introduction, please click here if you’re interested in viewing/reading Part 1 MISSISSAUGA/BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT conclusion: Studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture first.

Otherwise, we begin Brampton/Mississauga graffiti Part 2 video and transcript.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

NOTE: When I uploaded Part 2 to YouTube on March 25th, I referred to it as a DRAFT and said that I’d replace it at a later date with a more-worked version. I’ve since changed my mind. Viewing this a week later, I realize that it’s important to show “works in progress” –even as rough, rushed and off-the-cuff as this one was.

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:31 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (parked directly in front of the City of Mississauga Big Yellow evil empire, March 25, 2010):

Just to speak a little bit further on the lack of overlap between what the July and August 2009 Peel Regional Police graffiti photographs showed and mine —that was a surprise. I had actually figured that I would recognize more tags than I did.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing is, in my own driving and looking around, the tags that I documented, while they might still be there —they’re the original tags that I documented a year ago. And I often don’t see new ones by the same individual.

And I’m not quite sure how to interpret that.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Peel Police has [sic] suggested that catching graffiti [sic] is very difficult to do —and catching people in the act. That’s not a surprise.

So the question is, do the kids just naturally grow out of it in the sense that they’ve tagged maybe for a few months and then just grown out of that, or whether they’ve been caught, whether they’ve been talked out of it by buddies —I don’t know. But it doesn’t seem to be something that for a lot of them they don’t do for any length of time.

[DIP TO WHITE]

For graffiti people who might be out there watching this and offended, I have to admit that I haven’t been at the Mississauga Graffiti Wall. I’m aware that it exists. I just have difficulty getting access to it. But it appears to run —I’ve checked Google Maps and it runs along Streetsville. And I have seen the graffiti there and there’s a lot of beautiful stuff there. I’m talking about the artwork because it is Art —it’s just unauthorized Art and therefore it’s a crime, but—

It may be a crime, but it’s still Art.

In the case of somebody spraying “FTP” on a post, don’t convince me that’s art —that’s just tagging.

[DIP TO WHITE]

One thing just looking at the occurrence reports and the quality of the occurrence reports, who’s ever writing them, the descriptions are excellent. The best occurrence reports also explain what the graffiti represents. And I’m satisfied myself, that I’m beginning to recognize gang-related graffiti versus just a bunch of boys [sic] who are out on a lark.

[DIP TO WHITE]

However at the same time just because somebody’s putting up gang graffiti doesn’t make them gang members either. It just means that they know the gang symbols —as do I.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There was the underpass, clearly permission wall underpass and it had been sprayed with —I know one of the words was “White Power”. I can’t remember if there was the word “N*****” in there. I seem to remember that to be the case, which again would it clearly make it a Hate Crime.

But what was interesting is, I remember, oh, about a year ago, maybe more, Councillor Katie Mahoney saying, oh, we put up these permission walls and when we do, other graffiti artists respect this art and won’t draw over it.

Wronnnnnnnnnnnng! They draw over it.

And the best example to show that taggers will draw over other graffiti artists is just to go to the [points to Mississauga City Hall] skateboard plaza in there.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Some of the permission walls constantly attract taggers. There’s only one that doesn’t and it was done by a respected, well-known graffiti artist. And it seems to be that, yes, that stuff is not touched because people recognize it as a true graffiti artist.

The other stuff? Pfffft.

[DIP TO WHITE]

I have to say that at this time last year, I don’t think there was as much graffiti around as there is now. I think it’s on the increase. However, at the same time I also know that I’m a much much better at spotting it.

So, and Peel Police also suggest that maybe there isn’t as much —that the increase that they see might not be so much an increase in graffiti, as an increase in reporting.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There’s a lot of question marks, here. You see I’m kind of struggling with what the graffiti says.

But there’s absolutely no doubt that if you are not —I’m talking about now people who want to understand youth and trends of youth. I’m not talking about the kind of youth that feel comfortable walking into building.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The youth that I’m interested in and the most at-risk aren’t going to be writing as much. They’re more likely going to be expressing themselves on YouTube.

Again. It’s just a hypothesis right now.

And I think in the case of video, YouTube is richer for the [sic] kind of research because sometimes you see incidental things. In the case of one video, I was, I won’t say what the subject was but somebody was

[DIP TO WHITE]

driving down Highway 10. And you could see out the window, as they were videotaping out the car, there was a Mississauga Transit bus. And also a City of Mississauga Transit Enforcement vehicle. I don’t know if it was the 301 or 302 car but there are these little snippets that you get and then you can email the videographer and say, hey, can you tell me something about that incident.

Or, hey, I noticed some interesting graffiti you’ve got in your video. Can you tell me the location.

And you know, at first they don’t want to tell you. But then when they start looking at your stuff and they realize that yeah, you’re really interested in researching and what they have to say, they do share it.

[DIP TO WHITE]

When they really know that you’re not reporting the location, you get, I get emails —really terrific insights into graffiti and the tagging culture. And it is a culture.  It’s a —yes, it’s a sub-culture.

But when you think about these people [points to Mississauga City Hall], these people look down on —not just look down on, they look at taggers and graffiti artists and the “bad youth” with the most, with the most contempt.

And [points to Mississauga City Hall], these people view themselves as “decent folk” where the tagger is essentially an animal.

[DIP TO WHITE]

What was really interesting was to be going through and reading each of the [Peel Police] documents and I matched the photographs up with the occurrence reports and then I flipped the page and I saw big black spray paint on yellow brick and I knew immediately that it was [points to Mississauga City Hall] City Hall.

And as I looked at the other pictures, sure enough, somebody, and I don’t know the date, about late July, “bombed” City Hall!

And it looked like they started at the skate plaza, went around the front, did the pillars —I don’t know what those watchtowers are at both ends—

[DIP TO WHITE]

But I want to make it clear I will never report a location of graffiti and tagging. Because when you’re researching if you report, what happens then, it becomes erased. And because of that, you have changed something in what you’re researching.

And one of the things I’m researching is how long some of these graffitis [sic] —graffiti meaning paintings or drawings, or tags, stay up!

If it’s on public property, Public Works, I will tell you this, Public Works gets rid of stuff really fast. A lot of the stuff on private property stays up a lot longer.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Peel Regional Police and Peel Council say how much they try to work with the community. I had been at the Lincoln Alexander School lock-down, had an opportunity to talk to Malton residents and they spoke very highly of Peel Regional Police. Every last one, including a Honda Civic, you know, with the dark tinted glass coming in with three youth in it.

And you’re kind of thinking, oh oh, [laughs] this is going to be a drive-by shooting. No, they rolled down the window and they asked what was going on and those guys in there with the hats this way [turns cap sideways] they supported Peel Regional Police too.

[DIP TO WHITE]

What I’m trying to do is anything that I remember I want to record right now because I’m really interested in how much of it, of my observations, matches Peel Regional Police. And wouldn’t it be interesting if it’s different? Because it really shouldn’t be. If —there might be different stuff that Peel Police record, but the ratio of the Hate Crimes and “FTP”s [F*** the Police] and this kind of thing, the ratio should be the same as my photographs.

Should be. Well, we’ll see.

[DIP TO WHITE]

[PART 2 VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL "BOMBED" (MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL MATERIAL courtesy Peel Regional Police through Freedom of Information)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" Pic 2 MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL "BOMBED" (MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL MATERIAL courtesy Peel Regional Police through Freedom of Information)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" (undisclosed location) photographed March 30, 2010

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

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MISSISSAUGA/BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT conclusion: Studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture

April 2nd, 2010  

—As promised —the transcript of this video —uploaded to YouTube just prior to the Hate Crime/graffiti data released by the Peel Police Services Board at their Friday, March 26, 2010 meeting.

Advisory: I research graffiti/tags and do not report any locations no matter how offensive (even racist) it is. After all, if I am documenting such observations as how long something stays up, I can’t be the one reporting it! Having begun my research into graffiti on April 19, 2009, I can now confidently say that studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture. Graffiti and especially the tags, give marginalized/alienated youth a voice they simply don’t have anywhere else.

These youth never showed at Mississauga Youth Plan meetings. Never showed for Peel Youth Violence Prevention meetings.

These youth NEVER show. Because they KNOW.

Like I do.

Want to prep you for the graffiti stuff with a quote from Peel Regional Chair Emil Kolb, February 28, 2008.

“I had a young gentleman in to see me yesterday that was here to convince me that we need to get away from the word, ‘multi-culture’ and we need to get to the word of ‘integration’. If we don’t get to the word of integration —how these communities are going to integrate, that, maybe not in our time here soon, but maybe in his children’s time, they’ll be a big issue in this Region.”

To me, that’s the most important thing Chair Kolb ever said in the four years that I’ve been researching municipal governance.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB, MULTICULTURALISM vs INTEGRATION, YOUTH GANGS, RACISM

OK, enough background.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:09 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (parked directly in front of the City of Mississauga Big Yellow evil empire, March 25, 2010):

March 25th, 2010 and all I care about is that I get this report up on YouTube today and before tomorrow’s Peel Police Services Board meeting.

I read in the Toronto Sun that Peel Regional Police were going to be tabling their annual Hate Crime statistics.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And there was mention that quite a bit of the material that would be presented was in the form of graffiti.

So I’m absolutely intrigued and I want to record my own findings and study so far on graffiti and I thought what better place to do it than right here in front of Big Yellow evil empire City of Mississauga city hall. Because, see right there? Freedom of Information, direct observation, videotape, observing the Mississauga Youth Plan, Peel Youth Violence Prevention —all manner of emails and documents going back and forth, that, right there is a MAJOR Root of Youth Violence.

So I thought no better place than right here with that in the background.

[DIP TO WHITE]

OK, first of all the Mississsauga Youth Plan. I had been observing it including four meetings, ostensibly called “youth input” meetings.

Let’s put it this way. The youth that really needed a voice, not only weren’t represented, they wouldn’t have even been welcome there!

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I realize that the youth who were most at-risk, the ones who got in trouble with police and that I would see at Brampton Court House  —they’re not going to these meetings.

And I thought, well, how do I even go about finding them? And I managed to do that through YouTube. And it became very clear that if you want to know what youth are thinking (laughs) you don’t invite them to the Mississauga library!

The youth that I’m primarily interested in, the target group, the most at-risk, have already pushed these people aside and recognized them for what they are. Frauds.

[DIP TO WHITE]

But how do you gain access to them? To be able to see what it is that they’re thinking and what it is they’re saying because, for the most part, they’re not interested in talking to people like me. I’m 60 years old for example. They just— and a lot of them don’t even trust you or think that you’re legitimately interested in them. And, by the way, I don’t blame them.

And they certainly have a hatred —an absolute hatred, for institutions. And may I also say that I don’t blame them for that either.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So in March 2009, I watched a lot of true youth voice videos on YouTube. And it became obvious that graffiti was a big thing in those kids’ lives. So by April I was already deciding that I was going to start documenting graffiti here in Peel Region.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing I want to say is even though I’m a resident of Mississauga, I think Peel Region. And in fact, the fact that I’m wearing this hat today is symbolic of that. I’m a Peeler. I think in terms —I love the City of Brampton. I love Brampton kids. Those are the kids I taught for most of my career. So there’s this strong feeling of community within me and pride for Peel.

So it wasn’t just a case of me documenting City of Mississauga graffiti, I also wanted to know what was happening in Brampton. And I began my first photographic foray on April 19, 2009.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And I did not report any of the graffiti. While I put these samples up on my Flickr site, I did my best to try to hide the locations. And I can say that even now, that some of these graffiti and tags are still up.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There are some really-truly graffiti artists. And I mean like ART. It’s zero question, it’s ART.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing is, in July and August I also expanded my graffiti research to the Hawaiian Island of Maui. And also expanded my research to include skateboarding culture and to compare —and I also researched skateboarding, to compare the urban-style skateboarding that we have here in Brampton slash Mississauga versus the west coast style of skateboarding that you’d see in California and definitely on Maui.

Very very interesting and I also speculated that there would be a difference in the graffiti between the urban here Mississauga one and west coast, Hawaiian Island kind of graffiti as well.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that I did, is in July and August, what with me researching Hawaiian or Maui-based graffiti, it meant that there was a two-month window that I didn’t have graffiti here in July and August. So what I did just recently, is I filed Freedom of Information with Peel Police requesting their graffiti information for the months of July and August.

And I can’t thank Peel Regional Police enough for two reasons. For one thing the amount of material that they gave back both in terms of print-outs, colour print-outs and also one DVD cost —was roughly $44.00. And they waived the fee. I’m grateful.

But the other thing is, by reading their —Peel Regional Police’s occurrence reports and the quality of their observations and the insights there, that did two things. I learned a lot from what Peel Regional Police is looking for in terms of its own graffiti research. And to realize that they are applying Science to the study of graffiti. As am I, by the way.

[DIP TO WHITE]

One thing that I found with the graffiti here, is I agree too that a lot of the graffiti is —of the Hate ones, and there isn’t as much as you might think. Which in some ways is good.

But yeah, you see the swastikas. You see the White Power. You see N***** and niggaz.

However, I’ve also documented graffiti which shows sort of the Chinese —the target Chinese community, with the Chinese hat and the moustache, with “Chinaman” down there. Or drawings of the turban. And then —I mean really offensive stuff!

The other thing I was looking for was the relationship that these youth who do graffiti have with Police. Because I felt the relationship between youth and Police would be reflected in the graffiti.

And I admit that there’s some “F*** the Police” and “FTP” which is short for “F*** the Police”. And Peel Regional Police, in their July and August 2009 data also showed some evidence of that.

But what was neat was, it’s still quite rare.

And when you go, for example, to the City of Hamilton, which is one of my alternate study sites —comparative sites, “F*** the Police” is one of the most common pieces of graffiti. As is “FTP”. And I’m talking about every pole. Along every area— even in the parks.

And I’m talking about Beasley Park where “F*** the Police” is about this high in big black letters and has been there since I started back in April.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So there’s a really huge difference in the relationship, I believe —at least that’s what I think it suggests between the youth in the City of Hamilton and the Police, as opposed to what we see here in Peel and the relationship with Police.

Sure there’s the odd tag but it isn’t nearly as prevalent and as obvious as City of Hamilton.

And so one of the questions you ask is well, what’s the message there?

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that is interesting is, when I looked at the photographs that Peel Regional Police had for July and August, there was very little overlap between what they documented and what I did.

And the other thing really interesting is, Peel Regional Police —their July/August stuff, a lot of it was parks. And a surprising amount was City of Mississauga sites and parks. And City of Mississauga Corporate Security being the ones filing the reports on graffiti.

[DIP TO WHITE]

That’s not a surprise because I avoid City of Mississauga property because (whispers) I know about these security guards.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I always have a— I have to have a [sic] audio recorder to even feel remotely-safe on City property. So I try to avoid that and my analysis is more along the roadways and just driving along the roads and pulling aside when I see something.

[PART 1 VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

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MISSISSAUGA ‘S GREAT QUOTES: Councillor Nando Iannicca. “One of the great blessings that we have in municipal governance is…”

April 1st, 2010  

Tom Urbaniak, author of the book, Her Worship: Hazel McCallion and the Development of Mississauga (Paperback) sure has some excellent Hazel McCallion quotes.

Yesterday’s Blog highlighted the Hazel McCallion quote, “What happens if nothing happens?” —an elegant question that actually summarizes what I’ve been documenting in my four years of research into Mississauga/Peel municipal governance.

“What happens if nothing happens?” indeed!

Today’s Blog also features video of a drive-along Councillor Nando Iannicca’s Hurontario/Dundas area of Ward 7.

In this video we also share the most important thing that Councillor Iannicca ever uttered in the four years that I’ve been observing him.

“One of the great blessings that we have in municipal
governance is the fact that few people vote.”

–Mississauga Councillor, Nando Iannicca   December 13, 2006

So, here’s the video, followed by the transcript.

Video: MISSISSAUGA ‘S GREAT QUOTES: Councillor Nando Iannicca. “One of the great blessings…” (2:09 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

MISSISSAUGA ‘S GREAT QUOTES: Councillor Nando Iannicca. “One of the great blessings…” (2:09 min)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving around Hurontario/Dundas Ward 7, March 30, 2010):

Between Iannicca and McCallion —their two comments were the focus of my research in that they helped me see how I was going to research and document the Corporation of the City of Mississauga.

Hazel McCallion’s “What happens if nothing happens?”, well you record it anyway! That’s the point about research, is that you can record something happening. But you can also record nothing happening.

[DIP TO WHITE]

With Councillor Iannicca, it’s very obvious. It is what he said on [sic] December 12, [sic] 2006 Council meeting —it may have been the 13th.

When he said that one of the great blessings of municipal governance is that [sic] few people vote. And then he said I wish more people did, but the fact is that those who show up at a voting station Get It.

[CLOCK WIPE]

[Video shows entirely empty benches at the October 10, 2007 Mississauga Council chambers. Voice-over: Nando Iannicca speaking December 13, 2006.]

One of the great blessings that we have in municipal
governance is the fact that few people vote.

I wish more did but that fact is the or she who is going
to a voting station GETS IT..

[DIP TO WHITE]

So that became a huge, huge hint for me

[CLOCK WIPE]

[Video shows entirely empty benches at the October 10, 2007 Mississauga Council chambers. Voice-over: Nando Iannicca speaking December 13, 2006.]

One of the great blessings that we have in municipal
governance is the fact that few people vote.

I wish more did but that fact is the or she who is going
to a voting station GETS IT..

Signed,

The (“What happens if nothing happens?”) Mississauga Muse

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

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Hazel McCallion quote: “What happens if nothing happens?” –Why you document it anyway!

April 1st, 2010  

Tom Urbaniak, author of thebook, Her Worship: Hazel McCallion and the Development of Mississauga (Paperback) sure has some excellent Hazel McCallion quotes.

Today’s Blog is dedicated to just one Hazel McCallion quote —what to my mind, remain the most important words she ever uttered during the time I’ve been researching her.

“What happens if nothing happens?”

"HAZEL MCCALLION  QUOTE "What happens if nothing happens?"

Yes. That’s it. “What happens if nothing happens?” Those five words have defined my research. After all, what does a researcher do when Nothing happens?

Video: Hazel McCallion quotes: “What happens if nothing happens?” –Why you document it anyway! (2:31 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

REPORT FILED INSIDE CAR TOOLING ABOUT MISSISSAUGA  MARCH 30, 2010

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving through Ward 8, March 30, 2010):

So the question is out of all the things that I’ve videotaped Hazel McCallion saying, what is the most important thing?

And the irony, is that what I consider to be the most important thing happened very early on in 2007. And that’s actually a good thing.

Because by because of what she said there, it woke me up in 2007

[DIP TO WHITE]

—I don’t remember what the discussion was about. Could’ve been the “Cities Now”, it could’ve been any number of issues relating to Peel. But at one point, Hazel McCallion offers up comment and then this wonderful —which I still consider the most important thing that was ever uttered by anyone.

And it was simply a question. “What happens if nothing happens?”

“What happens if nothing happens?”

And really, that has been the defining moment and the defining way that I conduct my research. Because I’m forever documenting, “What happens if nothing happens?”

[DIP TO WHITE]

So either nothing happens or the pretense of something happens.

But by gosh, I have documented very few real things happening. So since these people have been elected in November 2006, four years have gone by and I’ve got to say, “What happens if nothing happens?”

Just a lot more of the same.

[CLOCK WIPE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving through Ward 7, March 30, 2010):

Between Iannicca and McCallion, their two comments were the focus of my research in that they helped me see how I was going to research and document The Corporation of the City of Mississauga.

Hazel McCallion’s “What happens if nothing happens?”, well you record it anyway! That’s the point about research, is that you can record something happening, but you can also record when you’re researching a MYTHissauga, you’re actually documenting a lot, a lot of nothing happening.

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

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