MISSISSAUGAWATCH buys black 2006 Dodge Charger R/T —and WHAT A BEAST!

May 27th, 2011  

Yes. It’s been forever since our last blog. What can I say? We’ve been busy.

Long story short. I’ve been without a personal car since January 2010 when I sold my much-loved 1985 silver Zed 28 Camaro to my mechanic. One year, four months I’ve been waiting for my car to find me.

It sure took its time but this week, the car of my dreams finally showed up. Thus enters a major distraction to blogging!

To my huge surprise, it wasn’t a WHITE Dodge Charger…

MISSISSAUGAWATCH  2006 BLACK DODGE CHARGER R/T
As is our custom, here’s the video complete with transcript.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH buys black 2006 Dodge Charger R/T —and WHAT A BEAST! (3:10 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]
[Caspian & Grafhic – Matrix Shit]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving Buick, video cam on dash “gecko”, May 26, 2011)

It is Thursday, May 26, 2011 and we’re following a Dodge Charger —a black one. And it’s not just any Dodge Charger, it’s a black R/T.

And it’s not any black R/T. That’s the car that I own now. We’re just returning from getting it mechanically checked and it’s been given a clean bill of health.

No accidents, mechanically —well, no problems with the mechanics just sound. A cherry car.

It’s got —it’s a 2006, with just a little bit over [sic] 50,000 in kilometers on it. And I’m just delighted.

What it means is we’re now going to pay for it.

It was with Peel Chrysler down on Lakeshore Road, listed at $15,995 dollars. An 8-cylinder.

It’s got —it’s a little bit tarted up. Special exhaust. It’s got the SR-8 hood scoop at the front. Couple of other things different.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Oh! The real thing about this car? It has ground effect lights!

I’ve been without a car since January 2010 when I had to trade in [sic] my 1985 Zed-28 Camaro. And I have had that car since 1985.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And I just waited and waited and waited looking for just the right car. And I always knew the car would find me and it finally did.

And of course once, one I saw it, knew it was mine, meant to be, I leaped on it very quickly.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There it is. Our car. There it is.

[DIP TO WHITE]

All right, handsome, move it.

Yup, there it goes. And I can’t keep up. Here we go.

Ooo. I’m beating it.

[DIP TO WHITE]

—cuz there’s what it looks like in the mirror.

[DIP TO BLACK]
[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

PEEL CHRYSLER 2006 DODGE CHARGER R/T 50,599 km

Please click here for the full WHEELS.CA ad for this 2006 Black Dodge Charger R/T.

Next, we can’t thank Peel Chrysler enough for this beautiful black beastie. So here’s a link to the Peel Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep website.

Here’s a link to all MISSISSAUGAWATCH Dodge Charger pics (Peel Police, Hamilton Police, Midland Police, Mississauga Transit Enforcement, Mississauga Corporate Security KNOB UNITS etc)

Last, this blast from the past.

DODGE CHARGER MISSISSAUGAWATCH concept car (August 2008)

DODGE CHARGER MISSISSAUGAWATCH concept car

Post Linx
Permalink | | Print This Article

Mayor Hazel McCallion media scrum transcript: “It is absolutely essential that we go to an Election”

May 12th, 2011  

Today we present primary source material —Appoint or Elect? Complete video of Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion  interviewed by Media during a break in yesterday’s Council meeting.

And, as is our custom, complete with video transcript.

Mayor Hazel McCallion media scrum: “It is absolutely essential that we go to an Election” (6:56 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—of Ward 5 the opportunity to choose their Councillor for the next four years. It’s only five months. So if it was a year before the next election, it would be different.

Yes, we have the authority under the new Act to appoint. But in such a short period of time that the Councillor’s been in the office it is absolutely essential that we go to an election.

And so today I hope that Council will give direction to the Staff to start preparing for an election. We don’t have an election staff at the City. We only, according to the Clerk, we only hire people when there is an election and train them for the election. So of course the staff has all been dispersed.

And so the Clerk now has to build a whole new staff to deal with an election.

She has estimated to date —and that’s an estimation, that it would have cost a half a million dollars for us to go. But I don’t think that we can take into account unfortunately, the cost because I think the people of Ward 5 deserve the right to elect a new Councillor.

So I would think that Council today will move in that direction. I’d be surprised —I’ve talked to a couple of Councillors, I haven’t had an opportunity to talk to many but their position is an election. So I would think that direction will be given today, to proceed with an election. Such a short term period, it is absolutely, in my opinion, essential that we go to an election.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

So if there was an election, would you support anyone specific? There has been some word that Bonnie Crombie would be your candidate—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—That is absolutely a rumour, you know I went to Bonnie Crombie’s party that she was to have as a winner. And I just jokingly mentioned, but you know the Press picked it up and made a big story out of it.

I jokingly said, just to sort of boost her morale or try to give her —well you know the Ward 5 obviously, position will be open. I did not recommend her, or even invited her. I just made a comment.

But of course, the Press twisted it, as usual, to make it into an unfortunate situation, that I am supporting Bonnie Crombie. It will be up to the people of Ward 5. And I’m sure that there will be a number of people will come forward to offer themselves. Yes, I’ve heard of quite a few.

I know that the person who ran against— one person that ran against her last time will be offering because she’s already told me that she will be offering herself for the office. But I’m sure it will be open to the —it will be open to the citizens of Ward 5 to elect their councils [sic]

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

So you—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—I think it’s unfortunate that we are faced with another election —and especially with the costs. But I don’t think we can let the cost determine the right of the people of Ward 5 to make a decision—

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—[inaudible] clear, you wouldn’t back any specific candidate, if there were to be a by-election.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

I don’t back any specific candidate at any time. The only candidate that I supported was unfortunate, during the last election, in which some very vicious information was sent out against Ron Starr and his family that was not factual. And I believe, that I, as Mayor had to take a stand on it.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

But smear campaigns happen often in politics.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Pardon?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

There’s a lot of smear campaigns during elections. Why take action on that one specifically?

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Of all the elections that’s the only one that I ever took a stand on. And I felt it so essential when false information is spread by, against a candidate and their family that is incorrect.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

But—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

I think the Mayor has that responsibility to take a stand. And I did.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Question about the cost and I’m not sure if you’re able to answer it. But I was reading in the papers today there was a —this election would potentially cost $500,000—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—That’s an estimate—

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—an estimate. Right.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—that the clerk gave. You know it’s unfair—

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Right.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—to tie the Clerk down to that. We will know what it will cost when she comes back. Which, there will be a period —60 days, that we have. She will come back with a factual report. She was asked for an estimate. She gave an estimate. Okay?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

But not necess— it won’t necessarily be 500, it could be significantly less—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—You just heard what I said. Please. She, she was asked for an estimate. She gave an estimate. Is that the answer to your question?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Yes.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Ya, thank you.

Just wait and, you know, it’s discouraging the way in which things get twisted.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Oh no, I’m just um —because people are going to be reading in the papers today and seeing that.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

—Yeah.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

And so they’re seeing—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

It’s already been seen in the papers. It’s already publicized —of her estimate.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Of course, of course. I just wanted you to basically address that. And you know—

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Yeah, it’s an estimate and I hope it will be reported as an estimate.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Right. Thank you very much.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

In fairness to the Clerk —who was asked for an estimate. She gave an estimate. Like my staff —like the staff of the City usually replies [sic] —with the facts.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

In 60 days you said?

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Pardon?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

60 days we’ll know for sure?

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Pardon?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

In 60 days we’ll know for sure, you say?

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

I don’t know —when the Clerk will be able to assemble the staff and what it will cost to run an election. With the advertising, we must let the people know. And there’s renting the accommodation, hiring the people to manage  —to staff the polls, etc.

That’s all. She will estimate it. She will come back with a more factual figure, when she has an opportunity to review.

We haven’t had a by-election in Mississauga. I can’t recall us ever having a by-election in Mississauga, so it’s something new for us.

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Half a million is a lot higher than Toronto’s estimate, $175,000.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Yeah. I believe they have a permanent election staff in the City —of the City of Toronto. I’m not sure about it, but I understand that they do. We don’t in this City. Once the election is over we disperse the staff —to save the taxpayers’ money. Instead of having people on staff waiting for another election.

Okay?

Any other questions?

Media Question (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Thank you very much.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion interviewed by Media (Mississauga Council Chambers, May 11, 2011)

Yeah. Thank you.

Okay?

Mayor McCallion leaves.
Mark Knopfler
(“Don’t Crash the Ambulance”)

Don’t crash the ambulance, whatever you do…

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Eve Adams (newly-elected Conservative MP) interview with Media on her last day as Councillor (4:55 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

Mississauga to hold by-election to replace Adams

Toronto Star – ‎22 hours ago‎
Mayor Hazel McCallion has quieted a growing storm in Mississauga. The powerful mayor pushed a vote Wednesday in favour of a by-election, instead of appointing a new councillor once a current member vacates her seat for one in Ottawa.

Residents laud departing Mississauga councillor Eve Adams

National Post (blog) – Tim Fraser – ‎May 11, 2011‎
Mayor Hazel McCallion said it was “absolutely essential” that the citizens decide who fills the seat, which will be declared vacant once Ms. Adams is sworn in as an MP in the federal riding of Mississauga-Brampton South. The Mayor’s comments came as

Mayor wants by-election

Mississauga – ‎May 11, 2011‎
Mayor Hazel McCallion told reporters she would rather have a by-election than a Council appointment to fill the vacant seat in Ward 5. File photo Mayor Hazel McCallion wants a by-election to replace the councillor in Ward 5, rather than having City

Council votes for Ward 5 by-election

Mississauga – ‎21 hours ago‎
With the help of other councillors, Mayor Hazel McCallion will take over duties in Ward 5 until a replacement councillor can be elected. File photos Ward 5 residents will vote for their next representative after City Council passed a motion today

McCallion offers faint praise for new Tory MP

Global Toronto – Megan O’Toole – ‎May 11, 2011‎
paid tribute Wednesday to Hazel McCallion, the long-time Mayor could barely muster a word of public praise for her Ottawa-bound colleague, instead lamenting the failure of several prominent Liberal MPs to maintain their seats in Monday’s election.

Skeptics question by-election cost

Mississauga – ‎May 11, 2011‎
Because of the clear division on council between those who are devoted supporters of Mayor Hazel McCallion and those who often criticize her leadership, the by-election could be important in tipping the balance of power on council.

Mississauga estimate for byelection cost almost triple that of Toronto

Global Toronto – Megan O’Toole – ‎May 11, 2011‎
Ward 5 has a significantly higher population than Toronto’s Ward 9 — 75000 people compared to 45000 — the cost differential appears excessive, said political scientist Tom Urbaniak, who has written a book on the tenure of Mayor Hazel McCallion.

Post Linx
Permalink | | Print This Article

Hazel McCallion’s puppet-councillors (both frequent Mayor’s Gala attendees) muzzle Gala questions.

May 7th, 2011  

The May 4, 2011 Mississauga General Committee meeting was truly one for the books.

Hazel McCallion’s “Team Hazel” puppet-councillors muzzle Mayor’s Gala accountability questions. (1:33 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

So it has been moved so we don’t need to go in-camera. All in favour with that? That carries. Thank you.

The Mayor has left so we’ll go back to Item 3, was it 3, yes, 3, which was responses to the Mayor’s Gala questions. Councillor McFadden.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Thank you. And thank you for bringing it to the committee meeting. And after certainly looking at the answers that were brought back, I appreciate all the extra work that I asked for. I do have a few questions that have come out of the answers that were given.

But in light of this information being now, I guess, look in to by the Commissioner, I’d like to hold off on any further questions until a report has come back from him. Or we could discuss it off-line.

They’re just minor details.

But thank you again, I certainly appreciate this. It’s been a very interesting process and —which started just by inquiry over the Brampton Gala and it was certainly not intended to be a personal attack, or certainly a personal vendetta, by any means.

But all I wanted was some transparency and some questions answered and I have gotten those. Hopefully out of this, we will get further clarification and maybe a little bit more transparency moving forward on the next Gala. And I’d be more than happy to sit down with the new Chair of the Gala and maybe suggest some way that accounting can be brought forward to members of Council on an up-to-date basis.

Like we did with Canada Day, where actually all of our accounting and receipts and tenders and proposals were all brought to Council on a monthly basis.

So if anything else I hope that we have certainly got some answers and that the community has gotten some answers from this.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Councillor Mullin?

Councillor Pat Mullin (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

I’m going to move receipt of the information.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Thank you. I guess I’d like to ask Councillor McFadden, I went through these questions and I guess I was a little curious as to some of the questions about by-laws that were passed 25 years ago. I’m not sure what that has to do with transparency.

I didn’t see the purpose in many of the questions so I wonder if you could explain for my benefit—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Jeez, I could take a guess.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

—because we’ve taken a lot of Staff time and usually when we have Staff undertake reports like this, there’s a reason for it not just— I know it’s not just idle curiosity. But was there a specific concern that you had that led to some of these questions?

And maybe you could outline that for us because that has never come forward.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

I think I did clarify that right from the beginning, Councillor Saito.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

No you didn’t. You just said you were interested in transparency and openness and that was it. You didn’t discuss if there were specific items of concern to the municipality that had —that encouraged these questions.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

When I first asked the questions, which I did in public, about the Mayor’s Gala, it was brought to my attention after the investigation by the Toronto Star into the Gala for Brampton. That started the ball rolling—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Yep.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

—for me asking questions on hopefully our Gala and our records were transparent and accountable.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

They’re not.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

—That’s how this started. And I said that in public, Councillor Saito.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Okay, thank you. And what is your next step on this?

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

I think I just said that as well

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

That’s riiiiight.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

That you’re meaning to do nothing.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Pardon me?

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Do noth—, no I said, you’re not going to do anything.

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

I’m not at this point. I’m going to wait —from what I understand the Commissioner is now asking questions about the Gala and I will wait because, according to my records, he is now asking questions and I will wait for his answers. To be brought forward with the report.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Okay and I’ll look forward to your comments at that time.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

And I’ll have some too, Councillor Saito.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Any other comments on this?

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Including Freedom of Information.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Otherwise move receipt? Thank you. All in favour?

Councillor Pat Mullin (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Move receipt. And I believe that there’s been a tremendous amount of time that has been spent, so I would certainly move that if there—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Gawd she hates any kind of accountability!

Councillor Pat Mullin (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

—any further questions that they be brought forward as a motion to Council so that we either support it, or not support any more into it.

If we’re satisfied, which I am, to the answers, I have moved receipt—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Of course, she’s been attending all the Galas.

Councillor Pat Mullin (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

—Any further questions should be through a motion at Council.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Of course, she’s been attending all the Galas.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Thank you, that’s the motion that’s on the table, Councillor McFadden, do you have a question on that motion?

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

No, I certainly agree with that, Councillor Mullin. But at the same time, I want it to be very clear that I am elected to ask questions. And I am elected to make sure that there’s transparency and accountability at City Council. And I shouldn’t be reprimanded for taking Staff time to find out answers that I have queries about.

And I’ll stand by those convictions, thank you.

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

Thank you. You’ve heard the motion, that with the direction to —that future inquiries come back through Council as a motion.

All in favour? Opposed? That carries. Thank you.

Someone move adjournment. Thank you. All in favour? It carries. Thank you.

[MUSIC: Don’t Crash the Ambulance, Mark Knopfler]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH reporting as Council adjourns (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

[laughs]

I mean what can you do, right?

Saito. Mahoney. They just want to have this BIG BLACK BOX!

The other thing is, I mean —I’m going to go down right now to the Freedom of Information office and ask questions based on what Councillor McFadden just said.

I got Freedom of Information back from the City of Brampton on the [Brampton] Mayor’s Gala. And now Susan Fennell talks about it —and the City of Brampton talks about the general framework of their Mayor’s Gala being open and all the books are open.

So I ask these questions and I got like five “Records do not exist”, “Records do not exist”, “Records do not exist”, “Records do not—”.

Like, seriously! How can you be accountable if the frikkin’ records don’t exist!

What? I have to take your word for it?

Like, do I look stupid? Is there “STUPID” tattooed on my forehead?

And then the next thing, I mean, this is so funny. The best thing that Susan McFadden can do is just say, don’t ask the questions here, file Freedom of Information on it.

[DIP TO BLACK]

Councillor Pat Saito, Chair (Mississauga Council meeting, December 13, 2006)

And thank you always to Cable 10 for their ongoing volunteer support in making sure that we have a very open and accountable Council.

We heard throughout the campaign that this Council was not open, was not accountable, and all those people running were going to make it open and accountable.

And I don’t know of any Council that’s as open and accountable as we are.

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Is their attendances at the Mayor's Gala motivating Pat Mullin and Pat Saito to muzzle inquiries? (not to mention Harold $$$Shipp$$$?)

Because of McFadden’s persistence on this matter we now know that only a fraction of the funds raised by the Mayor’s Gala actually go the artists. We know the event is, for the most part, an extravagant party for Hazel’s friends and the city’s most well-heeled residents.

We also know that, at one point, the City wrongfully issued tax receipts to some gala patrons.

Meanwhile, back in council chambers, it looks to some as though Ward 9 Councillor Pat Saito and Mullin have begun running interference for our venerable mayor.

—Mississauga News editorial, “Don’t Muzzle Queries”

Post Linx
Permalink | | Print This Article

Hazel McCallion on the Federal election 2011, “if a dog had run, they would have won.”

May 6th, 2011  

Today’s blog is meant to supplement National Post’s Megan O’Toole’s “Quote of the day: Hazel McCallion”

Hazel McCallion on the Federal election 2011, “if a dog had run, they would have won.” (1:33 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Mayor Hazel McCallion (Mississauga General Committee meeting, May 4, 2011)

So I hope that I, as Mayor, I’ve done what you-folks would have wanted me to do to congratulate all the new one —newly elected Conservative candidates in Mississauga.

At the same time, I want to express to those who lost that have been very dedicated members of the City of Mississauga. And I think of Peter Fonseca and Bonnie Crombie and Paul Szabo that have been very much a part of the City of Mississauga —made a major contribution to this city in so many ways. And I think we’ve lost some good community people which I think is unfortunate.

But when a thing crosses Canada like it did, I think there are some good people —and Bains, a very distinguished Sikh, a member of the Sikh community and has made, was considered maybe a leader of the Liberal Party down the road as maybe [sic] the first Sikh.

I think it’s unfortunate but at the same time that’s the way Federal and Provincial politics go.

I recall when Trudeaumania hit this country, I remember an article in the paper (I wish I had kept it), that they said that if a dog had run, they would have won.

So, when that hits. a lot of good people go down, which is unfortunate.

[DIP TO BLACK]
[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Prime Minister Stephen Harper gives video greetings at Hazel McCallion's 90th Birthday $350.00-a-ticket Party.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper gives video greetings at Hazel McCallion’s 90th Birthday $350.00-a-ticket Party (February 12, 2011).

MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL (AMO, OMERS, MYTHissauga Inc) ---morally beyond redemption

…the system is CORRUPT and this is why there is youth violence this is why there are guns on the street and drugs in the hands of children the youth are fighting with the system because it is CORRUPT there is no way to fix it because the people higher up are sitting nice in their big leather chairs, driving their nice cars, living their perfect life when some people in this world have to work hard to get by and even by doing so they get nothing, and after they realize how hard they have to work to get by they break down and no longer want to live life being part of the system because they realize that living life by the rules of the system gets you no where because it is CORRUPT!

–email from youth (age 19)

Post Linx
Permalink | | Print This Article

Peel Police Services Board: Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office (and the Ontario Ombudsman)

May 4th, 2011  

On January 23, 2008 Mr, Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office introduced himself to the Peel Police Services Board and explained his role in implementing Bill 103, Independent Police Review Act, 2007.

Note that Mr. McNeely’s presentation including question and answer session was 19:37 minutes long and edited to fit as closely as possible into Mississauga Council 10 minute deputation time-frame. Throughout Mr. McNeely’s presentation, the microphone kicked in and out resulting at least some of the time in a hiss-pop-crackle audio track.

It is what it is.

This video was shown at today’s Mississauga General Committee meeting as an information item. MISSISSAUGAWATCH will submit this blog entry into the May 4, 2011 Council meeting minutes. As is now our practice we provide this video, followed by the transcript.

Peel Police Services Board: Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office (10:24 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

First I waned to say that I’m hoping to carry out my duties and my responsibilities in an extremely collaborative manner. I’m hoping to create a relationship with police boards, police chiefs, police associations and obviously, members of the large public that I’m obligated to provide services to.

[DIP TO BLACK]

My role is to implement Bill 103 to deal with conduct complaints against police. But I see that role as one, to try to firstly to continue to increase and improve what I say is the great trust and confidence that most Canadians and most Ontarians have in police and policing.

[DIP TO BLACK]

90% of Canadians have great trust and confidence in police and policing so we’re talking about my focus being 10% of the general public that have some concerns.

[DIP TO BLACK]

We will develop clear criterias [sic]. [microphone comes on] Now you can hear me. We will develop very clear criterias [sic] to do so and that will be made known to everyone. And that is part of the transparency that I’m talking about.

So there will be very tight criterias. [sic] I’m still working on them. But there’s a level of understanding in administrative law and other areas as to the interpretation and the standards for vexatious etc and we’ll be looking at those and applying them very similarly.

I should advise you though that it is my intent that —and I’m trying to tell chiefs, don’t disband the Professional Standards Branches, they have a lot of work to do. Because I intend to send as many complaints back to the original Police Services as possible to continue to deal with.

The difference is, I will be overseeing it to some extent and because I have to be notified at the start and I’ll be there at the end.

So that’s a real difference but generally the bulk of investigations and dealing with complaints will be dealt with at the local level. And, but I’ll be making those extremely clear in regards to the policies and procedures that will be implemented.

[DIP TO BLACK]

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Are you going to try to establish a level of complaint that would become on your radar, if you will, in a more concentrated fashion? And complaints below that level would be handled, continue to be handled, in-house? Is that your intent?

Because if you replicate the number of complaints across the province, if you don’t, you’ll have an enormous organization that will probably never get from here to there.

It’s a tough job.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you for that observation, I agree with you. I did not anticipate it was gonna be this tough when I took the job. As after six months I’ve come to that realization but, to answer your question, I’m not going to establish necessarily the categories of level of complaints.

Every complaint we will look at seriously. That is one of the things the community is saying. They want to make sure what if they make a complaint that it’s taken seriously. So we will take it seriously. We will screen it. We will categorize it.

As I’ve indicated, most of the complaints will go back to the original service and will be surely-monitored through the process. There are some complaints for specific reasons, I may choose to send to another service to be investigated. And I’ll do that in consultation with the originated chief, if I can call it that and the chief that I’m going to send it to.

If I can give you an example.

If we were to look at a smaller police service, not Peel, and there may be a number of officers involved so there may be conflicts, I would like to err on the side of caution and call Chief Metcalf and say, you know, Chief, I’d like to send this to you to investigate.

So when will I determine that my office will keep a complaint? Similarly there has to be some over-arching concern that has come to my attention that I would want to do it. It may involve a senior-ranking officer.

So I have not totally established those categories and I’m not going to be rigid of them because I want to look at them on a case-by-case basis. Because something that may at first blush may appear to be something that I may want to retain, after I’ve done some preliminary investigation, [inaudible], you know what this is really not necessary. And I’ll send it back to the original chief.

So those things will be looked at in a case-by-case basis bearing in mind that every complaint, I’m going to consider it to be a serious complaint.

[DIP TO BLACK]

In the first year or two you’ll see a spike of complaints —about 25 to 30 percent increase and then it tapers off again back  to where it came from.

So that spike may necessitate some more investigations by local chiefs but I don’t see it as creating a huge budgetary strain on the service at the same time. But as I said, I intend to send most —80 percent back to the originating chiefs to be dealt with. Which to some extent is what’s being done now, except there will be a little spike because of the newness of the program.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Well, as I said to you previous [sic], on behalf of this board, I may not, I think we really do believe in being proactive and if training is an issue  and you see things that we can do different [sic] or suggest what we might do different [sic] in our training, I think from this board you’ll have a lot of support for those kinds of issues.

Because that’s really what makes you more sustainable in your operation and your budget and if we can resolve that process, by in the training process, then I think you’ll get a lot of support from this board and from our chief management team also. So thank you for mentioning that.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you for those words, Mr. Chair, and I really appreciate that.

[DIP TO BLACK]

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I just want to touch on a brief point and just mention it. It’s what we refer to as walk-in traffic. If a citizen comes into one of our divisions and gets an audience with the staff sergeant —and it might be a point of law, it might be a point of procedure, and it’s resolved. And the individual walks out happy because it’s all been explained to him.

Is this something you expect us to report?

How is the commission going to deal with that?

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Good question.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I know we touched on it briefly.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Very good question.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Maybe you’re had seconds thoughts. (chuckles)

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I’m hoping that that process you’ve just described, Chief, we’ll refer to as an” inquiry”. Coming out of that inquiry, if someone walks in and needs some clarification, and you know, someone walks often time people say, you know, I have a complaint but I really don’t want to make a complaint, right? Because it’s really not a complaint —it’s an inquiry.

You know, I got a ticket and, you know, it says I was going 60 in a 40 zone and the sign says 50, I don’t know. It’s really an explanation they’re looking for. That, I’m hoping to have us term as an “inquiry” and I’m hoping that it will be dealt with and that it will be dealt with at the station at the Service.

And all that I would need out of that is some basic information —I don’t need a complaint out of that or form out of that. [inaudible]

Then the next stage is someone comes in and say [sic] I want to make a complaint, we’re going to call that, we’re going to try to change the terminologies. And one of the terminology[sic]  that people tell me is confusing to them is “informal resolution”.

Now the legislation talks about it but hopefully through a regulation I’ll be able to say “informal resolution means any one of the following” and I’m hoping to call those a “local resolution”. So to try to resolve it at the local station or local service.

And so, to take, there will still— And the person still has the option of filing a complaint. But if they choose to go into this local resolution process, they’ll sign a document (that will) say that “I know I can file a complaint but I’m choosing to do this instead.” And again, that’s the only form that I really needed.

So, I don’t know if I answered your question, Chief.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

You did. You do want us to report it.

And I guess that’s— I would suggest then that the complaints are going to go up more than 25 percent. Because I think we deal with a lot at the divisions and really Mr. McNeely, with respect, we have to, at some point, deal with the paperwork —the amount of work that’s put on our staff sergeants and our sergeants for an issue that’s just clearly a misunderstanding between the citizen and the officer involved.

You know, an inquiry or a complaint, you know, I really find that difficult, I really do.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

And I appreciate that, Chief and I’m being cognizant of that. But my understanding is someone walks in and makes those inquiry [sic], there’s still a note made somewhere and I’m asking basically for the same information of that desk note that’s made. I’m not asking for anything different.

And so I’m cognizant of exactly what you’ve indicated about the increase in workload and my intent of not to do that. So the information I’ll be seeking is no different than the sergeant making a note at the desk that John Doe came in and we talked.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

It might be something as simple as a notebook entry.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

That’s right.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Okay, any other questions? Staff? No?

Again I want to thank you very much for taking the time to come out….

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: OUR ONTARIO OMBUDSMAN

MISSISSAUGAWATCH ATTENDS "SHARPEN YOUR TEETH III" CONFERENCE/WORKSHOP ONTARIO OMBUDSMAN'S OFFICE  (December 2, 2009 am)

Speech. Bill 103: quis custodiet ipsos custodies?

André Marin, Ombudsman of Ontario
Submissions to the Standing Committee on Justice Policy respecting Bill 103, An Act to establish an Independent Police Review Director and create a new public complaints process by amending the Police Services Act,
Toronto, January 30, 2007.

1 The government of Ontario deserves credit for introducing Bill 103, which reforms the police public complaints process and establishes the office of the Independent Police Review Director, a new police oversight agency with wide-ranging powers to oversee and investigate police complaints.  Independent civilian oversight of the police enriches democracy by enhancing accountability.  It also encourages our constabulary to constantly strive for best practices.

2 The new government body, however, is just that – a government body.  No matter how independent or arm’s-length of the rest of government it may be, it still reports back through a boss who is part of the executive branch of government.  In Ontario, we are fortunate enough to have an office reporting to the Legislative Assembly which provides independent oversight of all government bodies.  Since 1975, all provincial ministries, boards, commissions and agencies have been under the purview of the Ombudsman of Ontario, an officer of the Provincial Parliament.  For over 30 years, the approach to oversight and accountability in this province has been principled, consistent and predictable.  The Ombudsman has been there for tens of thousands of Ontarians, overseeing government involvement in every aspect of their lives, from womb to tomb, from cradle to grave, and standing up for them when they encounter problems.

3 But the Office of the Ombudsman won’t be there for anyone who might want to complain about the workings of this powerful new government body.  As parliamentarians, that should disturb you.  You should ask yourselves what causes the government to create an exception to this rule.  What is the overriding and overarching principle that would support parking the province’s main accountability vehicle at the door when we are talking about a new police review body?  I can think of no such principle.

4 In that same vein, you should also ask yourselves: “If not the Ombudsman, who will oversee this new agency?”  Indeed, the history of police complaints bodies in Ontario is not a happy one and cries out for oversight.  It is a history replete with allegations of bias, plodding bureaucracies and inefficiencies.  These bodies have come in and out of vogue over the years, like the flavour of the month.  We can only hope that history will not repeat itself.  But if it does, who will investigate this new super-agency?  Quis custodiet ipsos custodies: Who will guard the guards themselves?  Who can the police or the public turn to if someone is dissatisfied with the delicate decisions this government body will make regarding complaints against the police?

5 The answer is no one.  Buried deep in the entrails of the Bill is a particularly troublesome provision, section 97.  Remarkably, section 97 of Bill 103 states, “The Ombudsman Act does not apply to anything done under this part.”  This section effectively prevents the Ombudsman – and by extension the Legislative Assembly – from overseeing how this government body conducts its business of investigating complaints.  This, in my view, is a grave flaw that must be addressed and corrected.  It is bad news for the public in general and bad news for police in particular, who would otherwise enjoy the benefits that come with independent oversight by an officer of parliament.

6 Let me put it in context.  The Independent Police Review Director will be a potent arbiter of disputes between citizens and the police, with extraordinary authority – including the ability to issue summonses, enter premises and seize evidence.  The Director will wield tremendous power over chiefs of police, all Ontario police officers and, of course, citizens who complain to him or her, but will enjoy a privileged enclave accountable only internally to the Attorney General of Ontario.  No court can reach into the Director’s filing cabinet; no court can receive the Director’s testimony or try the Director civilly.  No complaint about the processes, practices and policies of the Director’s office can be independently investigated or resolved through shuttle diplomacy, and no recommendations can be made for reform in cases where a complaint against the Director is valid.

7 As I stated at the outset, in Ontario, by default, every provincial government organization, whether it’s the Ministry of the Attorney General, the Special Investigations Unit, the Coroner’s office or even the soon-to-be-reinvigorated Ontario Human Rights Tribunal, is subject to the statutory oversight of the Ombudsman, who is an officer of the Legislature.  It is the legislated function of the Ombudsman of Ontario to investigate and to make recommendations if a government body conducts its business in a way that is contrary to law, unreasonable, unjust, oppressive, improperly discriminatory or just plain wrong.  However, the Independent Police Review Director has been sheltered from this external and effective oversight.

8 Coming back to the fundamental question for you to ask yourselves as parliamentarians, what public policy would justify the removal of this government body from being accountable to you through the office of the Ombudsman?  Why should there be two different accountability regimes for the provincial government – one for the police complaints body and one for everybody else?

9 I have monitored with interest the debates in the Legislature over section 97.  A member of the Legislative Assembly, speaking on behalf of the government, justified the section’s existence on the basis that a similar provision existed in 1990 and, in any case, oversight still exists in the form of judicial review if someone’s not happy with the decisions of the new Director.  My answer to the first argument, with the greatest of respect, is: So what?  If the whole rationale for passing this legislation is to provide a new complaints commission from the ground up, why would you feel compelled to hang on to a relic from the failed past?  Why allow a provision that should not have been there in the first place to somehow muddle the present?

10 The exclusion of the Ombudsman in the Police Services Act is in fact an accident of history, carried over from the time when a police oversight body was initially created on a pilot basis for the Metropolitan Toronto Police in 1981.  At that time, one of the primary reasons for excluding the Ombudsman was the municipal nature of the police force.  When civilian oversight of police was extended throughout the province in 1990, this provision was simply replicated.  It has existed not for sound public policy reasons, but solely by happenstance.  It has managed to cling on, unchallenged, from one era to the next, from one Police Services Act to the next.

11 The Honourable Patrick J. LeSage’s April 2005 Report on the Police Complaints System in Ontario, commissioned by the government of Ontario, speaks for itself.  At no time does the report recommend a break from the provincial accountability regime or the role of the Ombudsman in providing oversight on behalf of the Legislative Assembly.  If, somehow in your deliberations, this honourable committee’s final judgment on Bill 103 hinges on whether or not, as has been suggested by a government member, Mr. LeSage really intended for the Ombudsman to retain oversight of this body, I would suggest you invite Mr. LeSage to come forward and testify before you.  You will then be able to ask him the very question I have put to him and satisfy yourselves as to what he truly intended.

12 As for the argument that you don’t need Ombudsman oversight because you can always go to court, this, with respect, is a red herring.  You can always bring to court any government body on a myriad of issues.  It’s not a substitute for the role of the Ombudsman.  Going to divisional court is a narrow and technical affair, a costly enterprise and an adversarial process. Upon reflection, I am sure you will agree with me that that is not the answer you would want to provide to constituents who are unhappy with the course of their complaints to the Independent Police Review Director.

13 You might be asking yourselves what happens in other provincial jurisdictions when dealing with oversight of police complaints.  In Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec and Saskatchewan, either the provincial Ombudsman or another specialized Officer of Parliament has jurisdiction to intervene.  In all of these jurisdictions, their respective legislative assembly retains the power and ability to involve itself in the investigation of complaints against the police through an officer of Parliament.  If this bill passes, Ontario will have the dubious distinction of being the only jurisdiction where police complaints are outside the reach of parliamentarians.  It behooves you to not let that happen.

14 What can you do?  Simple: Delete section 97 from the Bill.

—André Marin, Ombudsman of Ontario

Post Linx
Permalink | | Print This Article