MISSISSAUGAWATCH
MississaugaWatch Mississauga Watch Dear Madam Mayor:
The McCallion Letters

OCCUPY TORONTO about “this disconnect between us privileged ones in government” and those they serve.

October 23rd, 2011  

At yesterday’s OCCUPY TORONTO march to city hall, I noticed a sign that said it all —George Orwell.

“In a time of universal deceit – telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”

OCCUPY TORONTO, PROTEST SIGN, GEORGE ORWELL, "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act."
Today I provide a video and transcript of truths told by Mississauga Councillor Nando Iannicca, truths about “this disconnect between us privileged ones in government” and those they serve.

And remember that silly, pretentious “Our Future Mississauga”? About dreaming BIG? Or the fraudulent Mississauga Summit? About MYTHissauga’s “brave, bold future”?

Watch/listen to Councillor Iannicca and the truth about Our Future Mississauga —Province and Country.

Maybe then you’ll “get” what OCCUPY TORONTO is about!

Is Occupy Toronto about “All animals look at each other differently when watering hole dries out” (7:01 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT BEGINS]

[Regarding loss of $731,485 in transit Infoplace –the result of the city not following its own rules for collecting payment for tickets]

Mayor Hazel McCallion (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

Who’s responsible? Is it the, is it that Transit department responsible or the Finance Department? No communication, it seems.

And in a bankruptcy, without anything in writing that the project got changed, how can you —so, you know, it’s not as bad as the one in Toronto. But it’s bad.

Changes made without due authority. In the process.

So that’s all I want to say.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

Councillor Iannicca.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

(inaudible) —Madam Mayor, to your point. The whole episode is shameful.

And the aspect that is concerning me more and more is, you know I don’t know how many of us in government have realized but there starts to be seen this disconnect between us privileged ones in government —that wasn’t the case fifty years ago, when you went in government you got paid less etc etc.

And yet, you know, the government’s out now —folks that make a hundred thousand dollars and my constituents looking for a job see that —Boy police constable’s make is a hundred thousand dollars with their overtime. And transit drivers, some of them make a hundred thousand dollars with their overtime.

And here I am, Joe Citizen, struggling to get ahead, and I’ve lost benefits, I’ve lost my job if I’m an auto worker, taking hits at various times coming in for extra work and not getting paid for it.

Struggling to pay your taxes. And then they see episodes like this. And what explanation do we have?

[DIP TO WHITE]

This speaks to the issue of the future. Our taxpayers will not put up with this any more.

And the people they’re going to look at isn’t you —they’re looking at us. And then we turn around and look at you.

And George Carlson, our good friend and colleague on Council has a very good point. And I was wishing he’d be wrong, but we’d better be cognizant that he’s right.

“All the animals look at each other differently when the watering hole dries out.”

We still have some water in our hole. A lot of my constituents don’t.

We owe them a better level of service than what they received over this debacle.

But Madam Mayor, we’ll speak some more to it in-camera. Thank you.

[CLOCKWIPE]

Councillor Nando Ianniccaa (Mississauga General Committee, October 19, 2011)

In Canada, we’re at the cross-roads, the watershed. And here’s the fear that I have, and I won’t give all my secrets away. But I’m going to give you on big one right now.

You know what the future is? I’m going to tell you what the future is. It’s pretty simple. Here’s what the history was.

What I came here four cents on your tax bill overall came to this city. We’re up to eight cents now going up to nine. And we’re Much. Worse. Off.

The four to eight to eight-and-a half hasn’t solved our problems. Our infrastructure deficit’s as dramatic as it’s ever been! Isn’t that right?

So you know, well, you’ve doubled the taxes pro-rata on my home for the last twenty-five years, Nando, and you’re telling me we’re far worse off. Get ready for it to double again.

So you know what the solution is.

And from that macro-level, I’m going to bring it down to the micro. A solution as old as time. Start throwing stuff off the boat.

We will be getting out of businesses. Period. Full Stop.

Do you know why? ‘Cuz it’s brilliant. You know why it’s brilliant? ‘Cuz all of my problems go away. What do you mean?

“Hazel you’ve got to go to Ottawa and talk to them about funding for seniors homes.”

I’m not in the business anymore. Don’t have to go talk to them.

“Well you know the arbitrators are—”

“I’m not in that business. I don’t give a damn about the arbitrator.

“Well the union’s are uppity about this.”

I don’t have a union workforce in that field. I don’t, I’m not in that field.

It’s priceless, isn’t it? It works real well.

I don’t know what society we’ll live in. But that is what is coming.

[If] you don’t believe it, core services like highways for governments? We sold off a highway. Airports are going in that direction. And there will be more and more and more of it.

Because in one fell swoop, boy do you eliminate so many of my problems!

On the other side of the coin, well no, let’s go keep fighting in Ottawa. What it’s gotten us? Let’s go keep fighting the Province. What it’s gotten us?

We’ve got, and I love the conversation between Councillor Starr and Councillor Mahoney. It’s the Great Divide: the people in the million dollar homes that don’t think that they’re being fairly treated and then the single mother with three kids that says, “But, am I supposed to pay it?!”

Our answer is, well neither one of you will pay it. We’re just out of the business.

And if you look at the world around us —Councillor Starr said something brilliant. I just loved it. If it’s in a phone book and somebody else does it, why do we do it?

And there’s going to be more questions like that as we go forward.

To bring it back down to this level —and this is the importance that I would put on this conversation, if a user group tells me, Nando, it’s getting kind of expensive. We don’t know about your soccer pitches, you know, especially the ones with the artificial turf, it’s getting a little tired.

I just won’t build one with artificial turf. Easy. No problem.

“Well, I’ll charge ya three bucks.” I’m charging you nothing now! You just don’t have the pitch, that’s all. Is that a problem for you? And that’s what we’re trying to forestall right now.

Because get ready for this. We will be jettisoning many, many, many services at the municipal realm.

Last thought I’ll leave with you and I hope a smart doctoral student does it one day —I’m not being flippant. I mean this seriously.

Is there any corporation in the world —give me IBM, give me any one of them, that is more complex than municipal-regional government. I mean that literally.

What are your core businesses? What do you do and what are you trying to achieve?

Remember. Things I do for fun on the side are entire enterprises. We run golf courses on the side for fun. Some people run businesses just for golf courses. And fitness facilities and restaurants and dental programs and— I do all of that just for fun! You haven’t taken your shower yet and —I do that just—entire entities do that all by themselves.

We do it just as an aside. Thank you, Ron. I think that’s my cue. So. As we go forward, these conversations have to be had. And they’re not at this level, “What would you like us to do?” it’s “What’s going overboard?”

Cuz we’re fed up —you all sensed it from me. I’m fed up with the Provincial and Federal government. What it’s gotten us? And my cue as you all know, just let me finish with this one is, we just came through a Provincial election and so many of the Provincial delegates running for public office in our city, who, you know, even if you want to pretend to care, you should pretend when you’re asking for public office?

“Are you going to come to the discussion we want to have about social—” The majority of them didn’t even want to show up! When it behooves them to pretend to care? Didn’t even pretend to care. So why, well, I understand—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (Mississauga General Committee, October 19, 2011)

[claps, laughs] I love it.

Councillor Nando Ianniccaa (Mississauga General Committee, October 19, 2011)

But you see why I’m —so I don’t even want to send Hazel off anymore. I just want to say that we’re dropping that one off the curb. We’re not in that business anymore. Because I don’t want to force both people, these two, out of their homes.

Somebody’s got a better idea, let me know.

But that is the Future.

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

There you have it.

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Watch live streaming video from occupytoronto at livestream.com

Next. To appreciate what some people at OCCUPY TORONTO might be protesting, and what Councillor Iannicca referred to as the “privileged ones in government”, what follows is a complete SUNSHINE LIST of City of Mississauga employees making $100,000 or more for 2010 followed by the 2006 SUNSHINE LIST for comparative purposes.

RED indicates City Staff researched through Freedom of Information or video.

And don’t forget those “privileged ones in government” salaries also come with a life-long OMERS (Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System) pension and benefits.

City of Mississauga Salary Disclosure 2011 (Disclosure for 2010)
Surname Given Name Position Salary Paid Taxable Benefits
ADKINS RODNEY R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
AHMED NADIR Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
ALEXANDER WENDY A. Director, Transportation & Infrastructure Planning $148,842.08 $372.21
ALLELY RICHARD J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
AMRING SUSAN M. Manager, Economic Development $130,517.57 $313.86
ANDERSON SCOTT W. Senior Project Manager, Transportation $131,842.96 $704.26
APLIN GLENN V. Fire Captain $108,768.15 $258.96
BACON DENIS P. Manager, Parks $102,029.97 $244.32
BAKER JANICE City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer $245,864.06 $8,358.64
BALCHANDANI RAJAN Manager, Energy Management $108,739.51 $271.41
BALL MARILYN Director, Development & Design $147,881.38 $372.21
BANIC SONJA Manager, Public Affairs $112,300.64 $280.44
BAQILEH BASSEM Transit Operator $100,497.59 $299.79
BARRETT MURRAY A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $258.96
BARRETT STEPHEN R. Manager, Transportation Asset Management $115,683.24 $287.01
BARTER TOM C. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $244.40
BASTERFIELD MICHAEL D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $260.52
BATE ANDREW Supervisor, Traffic Operations $111,357.70 $207.15
BEARD DAVID M. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $247.52
BEAUPARLANT MARK Manager, Corporate Financial Services $128,730.01 $313.23
BEHARRY ROCHARD Legal Counsel $128,732.04 $259.86
BENCH MARY ELLEN City Solicitor $178,468.52 $429.27
BERNARDI DINO Captain, Fire Suppression $110,884.42 $260.52
BIRD BRIAN G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $270.92
BLATT DIANA F. Workforce Planning & Analysis Specialist $115,154.61 $216.48
BODNAR GREG Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $111,629.36 $244.32
BORGATTI RICHARD W. Fire Captain $107,612.63 $264.68
BOWSLAUGH ROBERT L. Manager, Facilities Maintenance $105,938.49 $264.90
BOYCE DEREK Manager, Business Planning $104,952.37 $262.38
BOYD MAX W. Capital Project Manager $112,131.34 $280.44
BRADLEY SEAN Fire Captain $102,590.21 $254.68
BREAULT BRENDA R. Commissioner, Corporate Services &Treasurer $186,385.74 $9,486.00
BREUER DAGMAR Capital Project Manager $114,001.46 $280.44
BREWDA KATIE Account Representative, Community Services $108,094.86 $62.40
BRODERICK DAVID Manager, Marina Operations $101,335.28 $244.32
BROWN BETTE Communications Officer, Fire $115,820.44 $250.64
BROWN JAMIE Manager, Sponsorship & Corporate Development $101,887.38 $244.32
BUCKLEY FRANK M. Manager, Parks $112,443.10 $244.32
BUCKSTEIN ELAINE Director, Enforcement $148,842.08 $372.21
BUGDEN KEVIN Assistant Deputy Chief $113,312.72 $238.60
BULGER JAMES E. Fire Captain $105,414.86 $274.56
BURKE PAUL G. Fire Captain $104,894.94 $254.80
BURNS ROBERT S. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
BURT SUSAN Director, Arts & Culture $153,561.43 $372.21
CALLIGARIS JOSEPH Fire Captain $102,281.92 $248.96
CALVERT CLIFF A. District Chief, Fire $111,235.02 $264.06
CALVERT JOHN D. Director, Policy Planning $148,842.08 $372.21
CAMILLERI TIMOTHY A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $259.48
CARR BRUCE Director, Strategic Community Initiatives $154,685.08 $372.21
CESARIO SILVIO Manager, Maintenance & Operations $127,673.27 $313.86
CHALLINOR JASON Fire Captain $102,281.92 $291.60
CHAN STEPHEN Manager, Staffing & Development $116,533.22 $280.44
CHANCEY DOUGLAS T. Fire Captain $112,260.90 $286.52
CHIN DONOFRIO HELEN F. Data Architect $114,416.93 $280.44
CHONG DIANE Project Leader $110,827.70 $280.44
CHUNG TONY Transit Operator $102,542.67 $299.79
CIRELLO JIM Manager, Financial Services, Corporate Services $117,985.90 $293.72
CLARK JOHN A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $271.44
CLARKE JOHN P. Supervisor, Traffic Signal & Street Lights $113,585.43 $279.21
CLEMENT ROGER Chief Fire Prevention Officer $110,511.44 $255.22
COFFEY KEVIN Fire Captain $102,423.62 $238.56
COLES SUZANNE Area Manager, Library Services $106,391.52 $266.02
CONNOLLY MARK R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $268.84
CONNOR JOHN DAVID Fire District Chief $127,857.84 $288.90
CORBET CHRISTOPHER Fire Captain $104,930.43 $293.06
CORCORAN RAYMOND M. Fire District Chief $128,702.87 $280.58
CUNNINGHAM CRAIG Fire Captain $104,487.14 $256.66
CURRY DARRELL Manager, Frank McKechnie Facility $101,435.90 $244.32
CUSUMANO LEO J. Manager, Inspection Services $116,533.22 $280.44
CZYRKA PAUL J. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $245.96
DAEUBER WILLIAM E. Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
DAMASO PAUL Manager Celebration Square $103,376.64 $251.76
DAUM RANDY Fire Captain $104,861.16 $281.22
DAVENPORT MARK Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
DAVIS ERIC V. Captain, Fire Prevention $107,535.04 $250.64
DAVOLI LUIGI Fire Captain $102,281.92 $318.76
DEAN GEORGE Fire District Chief $119,975.38 $322.18
DECOSTE STEPHEN D. Fire Captain $111,414.54 $282.88
DEDMAN KEALY Manager, Development Engineering $109,858.01 $285.81
DEJAK TOM A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $308.36
DELFINO GUSTAVO Manager, Service Development $112,004.53 $280.14
DELUCA DANIEL Plans Examiner, Fire $100,115.07 $228.60
DEMARTINI PETER G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DEMPSTER DAVID S. Fire Captain $105,063.80 $281.32
DENIKE TIMOTHY E. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DEVEAU DOUGLAS C. Captain, Fire Suppression $113,860.49 $244.40
DI MILLO IVANA Director, Communications $152,544.76 $370.65
DIETRICH ANGELA Manager, City Wide Planning $112,207.58 $280.44
DOCKENDORFF CASEY Assistant City Solicitor $113,700.12 $284.03
DOUGLAS ALEX A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $287.04
DRAPER STEVEN D. Manager, Information Technology, Corporate Services $122,431.66 $305.73
DUBKOWSKI JAMES R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DUFFY KEVIN J. Deputy Fire Chief $161,691.58 $871.57
DUNN ARLAND L. Fire Captain $108,608.85 $280.80
EBRAEMI FAWAD A. Project Manager $130,161.81 $316.05
EDWARDS ERICA Senior Buyer $110,586.86 $235.56
ELLIOTT ROBERT G. Manager, Projects $102,383.34 $255.48
ELLIOTT-SPENCER PATRICIA Director, Finance $164,230.75 $406.83
EMICK CRAIG Information Technology Auditor $107,532.79 $279.51
ENG SALLY P. Director, Internal Audit $151,763.58 $372.21
ENNAMORATO DANIEL Fire Captain $110,277.70 $244.40
EVANS JAMES Fire Captain $104,861.16 $249.40
FABRIS DIEGO City Arborist $102,453.86 $224.28
FARION CLIFTON Building Maintenance Coordinator $108,299.52 $253.16
FARRELL PATRICIA A. Planner $103,069.33 $224.28
FAYLE NORMAN Fire Captain $107,439.27 $260.00
FERRARA FELICE Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $117,829.56 $244.32
FINNIGAN TERENCE J. Fire Captain $110,032.04 $250.64
FLACK PAUL F. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $256.88
FLANIGAN MICHAEL B. Special Traffic Projects Leader $103,554.24 $258.66
FLEMING RANDY Training Officer, Fire $115,436.59 $230.76
FORD COLLIN Transit Operator $109,070.07 $149.79
FRANCIS LAWRENCE P. Fire Captain $105,443.35 $250.12
FROST MICKEY Manager, Transit Operations $137,043.35 $329.76
FUDGE JOSEPH Legal Counsel $139,389.85 $335.10
FULLERTON RUSS Transit Operator $115,374.37 $149.79
GAFFNEY SHAWN M. Fire District Chief $124,144.71 $308.26
GALAMINI DOMENIC Supervisor, Traffic Maintenance $116,931.26 $244.32
GALATI DOMENIC Maintenance Standards & Permits Supervisor $117,417.72 $238.71
GARNER RICHARD J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
GILMOUR MICHAEL S. Fire Captain $108,190.59 $255.32
GOLD GRAHAM Fire Captain $103,621.31 $246.88
GRAZIANO MARIA P. Database Administrator $112,139.69 $234.00
GREEN DANIEL G. District Chief, Fire $129,853.90 $316.46
GREEN GARY S. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $246.90
GREER CRYSTAL Director, Legislative Services & Clerk $153,224.33 $372.21
GRIFFITH MARG Project Leader $109,968.42 $280.44
HAGAN ANNEMARIE Manager, Museums $100,142.00 $244.32
HAGERMAN ALAN J. Fire Captain $105,193.35 $266.76
HAND WAYNE L Manager, Meadowvale & Erin Mills Arenas $102,838.82 $244.32
HARVEY ANDREW W. Manager, Rapid Transit and Parking $129,027.51 $313.86
HAWKINS JOHN Senior Inspector $100,924.74 $190.05
HEAD MICHAEL R. Fire Platoon Chief $127,850.59 $299.42
HEADRICK DARREN Enterprise System (SAP) Portfolio Coordinator $112,131.34 $280.44
HERRIDGE DONNA E. Manager, Financial Planning $128,147.32 $313.86
HICKS BRUCE Fire Captain $107,439.27 $308.88
HILL JOHN A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $258.96
HILLIS JAMES (aka Jamie) Manager, Security $112,131.34 $280.44
HILLS ALAN Fire Platoon Chief $124,599.12 $293.28
HINTON JAMES M. Acting Director, Enforcement $104,795.68 $262.31
HINTON JOHN F. Manager, Financial & Customer Service $104,669.77 $262.05
HIPGRAVE MARY A. Senior Internal Auditor $109,968.42 $280.44
HOLMES JAYNE Senior Project Manager $117,917.66 $294.24
HOMEVOH ERNEST Transit Operator $107,751.37 $199.79
HORVAT CAROL Executive Assistant, Mayor $101,658.64 $244.32
HULME HAL V. Supervisor, Survey & Inspection $108,817.66 $244.32
HUNTER PAUL D. Fire Platoon Chief $127,904.32 $299.42
IMPERIALE JOHN Manager, Information Technology, Community Services $121,826.55 $308.58
JACKSON ALLEN P. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
JACKSON JEFFREY Director, Revenue & Materiel Management $149,592.08 $372.21
JAMIESON RANDALL Project Manager, Community Services $110,105.19 $275.85
JAY MARTIN R. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $247.00
JEHU STEPHEN C. Fire Communications Operator $107,041.16 $218.62
JETHVA REKHA Manager, Planning and Integration $128,621.37 $313.86
JOHNSON FREDERIC C. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $283.92
KAMINO KEITH T. Senior Internal Auditor $101,043.30 $252.72
KAN LINCOLN Manager, Environmental Services $114,633.24 $287.01
KANAMALA SUNIL KUMAR Project Leader, Transit Facility Planning $100,378.33 $244.32
KEATING MIKE E. Manager, Transit Vehicle Maintenance $130,446.45 $313.86
KELLS HELEN M. Systems Specialist $106,594.18 $197.22
KELLY ANDREW Fire Captain $109,193.68 $299.52
KELLY LORI A. Manager, Strategic Community Initiatives $125,857.89 $308.91
KEMPF STEVEN G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $265.20
KENEALY ROY Superintendent, Operational Support $103,782.41 $259.86
KENT GARY Director, Corporate Strategy and Innovation $154,685.08 $372.21
KERNAN PAUL Fire Captain $114,314.26 $248.56
KETTLE HAROLD J. Technical Specialist $104,664.75 $244.32
KEUPER DALTON INGRID Library Community Development Specialist $100,378.33 $244.32
KIRKPATRICK ROBERT B. Fire Captain $109,241.18 $278.62
KNIGHT MARLENE Manager, Materiel Management $125,587.45 $313.86
KOPAMEES ALAR Fire Captain $104,861.16 $267.80
KREMER RONALD Supervisor, Networking Service $101,910.17 $254.91
KRISMAN GRANT M. Fire Captain $103,760.25 $249.08
LAING DEBORAH Fire Communications Officer $111,365.67 $238.56
LAING GREGORY B. Deputy, Training & Prevention $164,745.48 $1,822.75
LAMANNA SABINA Manager, Human Resources, Community Services $109,378.64 $273.63
LAURENCE BRIAN J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $256.88
LAW WENDY Legal Counsel $122,849.49 $345.32
LAWRENCE JACK Director, Information Technology $148,842.08 $372.21
LEE FRANK Manager, Information Technology, Planning and Building $119,058.87 $297.99
LEI GUANG Transit Operator $106,940.61 $149.79
LEVESQUE ROBERT Capital Project Manager $112,131.34 $280.44
LIBOIRON ROBERT L. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
LIN YUNGFU Project Leader $112,131.34 $729.84
LOHUIS JOHN Director, Recreation & Parks $154,685.08 $372.21
LONGMUIR GAVIN Manager, Urban Forestry $102,508.46 $244.32
MACDONALD DEBBIE Manager, Shared Services $112,317.51 $280.66
MACDONALD HEATHER Director, Business Services $154,685.08 $372.21
MACEACHERN DAVID Training Officer, Fire $115,313.27 $244.40
MACKENZIE CHRISTINA Manager, Creative Services $101,335.28 $244.32
MACKINNON KAREN G. Communications Coordinator, Fire $121,577.94 $268.92
MAGGIO ALBERT J. Fire Captain $107,543.60 $250.64
MAJCHER LAURIE E. Manager, Management Consulting $125,587.45 $313.86
MAJOR NANCY Manager, 311 Call Centre $116,402.42 $141.00
MAKURAT ROBERT Fire Captain $102,281.92 $241.16
MALO STEPHANE Fire Captain $102,356.33 $244.70
MANCUSO GIUSEPPINA Project Manager, Elections $104,880.52 $197.22
MANN JOHN Fire Captain $102,281.92 $253.64
MANSFIELD DOROTHY E. Manager, Community Services $115,432.75 $280.44
MARCUCCI DAVID Manager, Planning & Heritage $121,270.70 $303.27
MARINOFF GEOFF Director, Transit $176,515.42 $424.75
MARION DAVID Manager, Geomatics $137,043.68 $329.76
MARLAND RUTH Team Leader, Long Term Planning $109,358.32 $244.32
MARSHALL GREIG Fire Captain $104,894.93 $250.12
MARTIN LYNN Systems Support Specialist $122,772.78 $224.28
MASLIWEC MICHAEL N. Manager, Financial Services, Transportation and Works $125,587.45 $313.86
MATHESON SHAWN Fire Division Chief, Training $121,329.87 $303.27
MAYO MARY Manager, Enterprise Systems $125,777.07 $313.86
MCADAM PHILIP D. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $262.08
MCCALLION HAZEL M. Mayor $136,640.92 $1,648.90
MCCUTCHEON STEPHEN J. Fire Captain $107,578.37 $263.12
MCDOUGALL JOHN A. Fire Chief $167,913.56 $3,481.00
MCLEAN MARCELL L. Fire Communications Operator $111,307.30 $212.38
MCNALLY MARTIN I. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.84
MCPHAIL LARRY J. Platoon Chief $128,659.96 $299.42
MCPHAIL ROBERT Captain, Fire Suppression $108,768.15 $250.64
MEEHAN DOUGLAS E. Manager, Prosecutions $116,533.22 $280.44
MELVILLE ANDREW D. Fire Captain $105,063.80 $264.68
MENEZES ERIC Supervisor, Streetlighting $113,265.82 $214.38
MESIH CONNIE D. Manager, Property Assessment & Taxation $130,767.57 $313.86
MICHAUD DAVE H. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.84
MICHELUCCI ENIO Contract Administrator, Trees $104,051.55 $222.22
MINKOWSKI MICHAL Legal Counsel $139,389.85 $335.10
MITCHAM PAUL ARTHUR Commissioner, Community Services $186,385.74 $10,890.76
MONTGOMERY WILLIAM R. Fire Captain $108,768.15 $255.84
MOONEY JAMES Systems Technician, Fire $101,422.74 $236.90
MOORE ALLAN J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $314.60
MORAES FERNANDO Project Manager, Architectural $103,259.76 $258.30
MORLEY JAMES D. Manager, Client Services $119,632.41 $299.19
MOULTON ALAN Fire Captain $108,768.15 $255.84
MUJAWAZ AHMAD Project Manager, Structural $109,149.63 $273.33
MURPHY ANNE M. Area Manager, Library Services $118,795.17 $288.49
MURPHY LAWRENCE Manager, Court Administration $112,131.34 $280.44
MUSIAL HENRY Fire Captain $119,051.96 $254.80
NADON RAYMOND A. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $280.80
NASATO PAUL Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $104,214.27 $234.30
NG NORMAN Supervisor, Customer Service $112,131.34 $280.44
NISHIHAMA WAYNE G. Manager, Urban Design $112,131.34 $280.44
NOBLE RALPH A. Fire Captain – South – B $114,470.92 $250.64
NORWOOD STEPHEN T. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $259.48
NUCIFORA GINO Captain, Fire Prevention $119,104.29 $244.40
OFFLESS KEVIN Senior Inspector $101,379.30 $190.05
O’HALLORAN CAREY L. Manager, Infrastructure Management Systems $107,805.70 $280.44
ORMOND MARK A. Fire District Chief $124,105.78 $294.74
OSBORNE BRENDA Manager, Environmental Management $105,970.00 $221.97
OUTTRIM RYAN Firefighter $101,735.12 $248.36
OWEN KENNETH Director, Facility & Property Management $153,224.33 $372.21
PALA ZELJKO Transit Operator $113,333.05 $229.79
PALLADINE PAUL Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $109,946.75 $239.04
PARDY ROGER Fire Captain $104,861.16 $254.28
PARISI PAUL Fire Captain $102,351.44 $249.48
PARSONS PETER C. Senior Inspector $102,250.56 $190.05
PARTIPILO JOSEPH Senior Inspector $113,226.28 $181.62
PASSFIELD GORDON L. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.32
PATEL KESHWER Manager, Financial Services, community Services $115,050.09 $288.00
PATERSON EDWARD D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $267.28
PATON CAROLYN Corporate Lead Business Planning & Performance Management $106,559.78 $244.32
PAVAN LESLEY M. Manager, Development, Planning and Building $106,839.59 $277.05
PEARCE RICHARD Enterprise Geographic Information System Project Leader $115,016.93 $280.44
PENTELIUK DAVID Area Manager, Library Services $103,240.24 $258.66
PERKINS ROBERT Building Services & Operations Supervisor $110,453.70 $213.12
PERRY CAROL Tax System Coordinator $109,968.42 $280.44
PETOVELLO LARRY F. Director, Economic Development $151,763.58 $10,838.64
PETRI MATHIAS Building Services & Operations Supervisor $112,616.29 $222.42
PETROSONIAK STEVE D. Fire Captain $107,682.70 $255.32
PHANEUF PATRICK J. Superintendent, Operations $116,533.22 $280.44
PHELPS GREGORY G. Plans Examination Officer, Fire $112,540.95 $258.74
PICCOLO JOHN Project Manager, Electrical $112,131.34 $280.44
PICO FERMIN Manager, Transit Business Systems $122,360.37 $294.24
PIETTE LAURA M. Director, Planning, Development & Business Services $151,257.43 $370.35
PIRES PAUL Transit Operator $103,319.65 $209.79
PITUSHKA JOSEPH Director, Engineering & Works $148,842.08 $372.21
POGUE JOHN D. Manager, Burnhamthorpe & Tomken Facilities $101,741.30 $244.32
POITRAS RAY L. Manager, Development $114,582.28 $280.44
POLETTO MARIO Captain, Fire Suppression $111,685.74 $288.60
POUNDER DONNA E. Manager, Training & Development $101,335.28 $244.32
POWELL MARTIN Commissioner, Transportation and Works $186,385.74 $12,186.32
RAJA MANJIT Senior Database Administrator $100,015.26 $244.32
RAMER ALLEN Captain, Fire Suppression $101,657.20 $233.88
RECK KIMBERLY A. District Manager, Community Services $110,763.91 $277.05
REIACH WILLIAM C. Fire Captain $105,525.54 $262.60
REID MAVIS Manager, Compensation & Benefits $111,935.79 $279.84
REYNOLDS MICHAEL W. Fire Captain $107,577.69 $250.64
RICHARD PAUL Fire Captain $109,904.79 $284.44
RIDDELL LOUISE ANN Manager, Labour Relations $126,522.41 $303.90
RIDLEY LAWRENCE Firefighter $116,630.10 $219.66
RIVERS DEBORAH A. Manager, Human Resources, Corporate Services $112,116.68 $279.84
ROBERTS NIGEL Manager, Departmental Systems $109,773.68 $274.29
ROBEZNIEKS AGRIS Director, Building Services & Chief Build Official $154,685.08 $372.21
ROEDER ED Superintendent, Transit Maintenance $111,921.24 $279.84
ROLLINS GARY S. District Chief, Fire $130,882.67 $294.10
ROSE DUILIO A. Manager, Animal Services $101,125.15 $244.32
ROWSELL JEFF Information Technology Specialist $103,230.32 $223.98
ROY DARRELL G. Fire Captain $105,636.34 $252.72
RUFFINI LORENZO Strategic Leader $124,749.89 $311.37
RUSNOV DIANA Manager, Development $114,582.28 $280.44
RYDZEWSKI JOHN B. Director, Hershey Group $148,842.08 $372.21
SAJECKI EDWARD Commissioner, Planning & Building $186,385.74 $9,711.40
SANDERSON RONALD Manager, Realty Services $106,625.45 $210.48
SASAKI ROBERT H. Manager, Transportation Planning $129,285.04 $313.86
SAVERY DOUGLAS Fire Captain $107,439.27 $270.92
SAVINI EZIO Manager, Capital Works $130,517.57 $313.86
SCARANGELLA MICHAEL A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $347.36
SCOTT TIMOTHY Captain, Fire Suppression $114,907.39 $261.56
SCRACE DAVID G. Senior Inspector $115,427.36 $190.05
SHAO YIDAN Database Administrator $104,530.06 $235.20
SHARPE KEN J. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $297.44
SHETH RAJ Manager, Facilities Planning & Development $138,855.76 $333.87
SHIN DAVID Project Leader $116,533.22 $280.44
SHIRLEY MICHAEL Transit Operator $100,356.79 $209.79
SINGH NAVIN Transit Operator $105,184.67 $299.79
SLACK SHAWN Director, Customer & Business Services $146,853.54 $366.96
SMITH GEOFF Team Leader, Park Assets $102,130.21 $244.32
SMITH GORDON R. Fire District Chief $120,808.37 $280.58
SMITH R. DENNIS Fire Captain $107,439.27 $253.24
SNOW ROBERT Fire Captain $104,861.16 $244.40
SONI VIPULCHANDR Transit Operator $105,849.77 $249.79
SOULLIERE WILLIAM P. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $257.92
SOUSA ALCIDES V. Maintenance Project Manager $116,533.22 $280.44
SOUSA DREW Manager Employee Health Services $101,335.47 $244.32
SPAGNOLO FRANK Manager, Plan Examination Service $115,432.75 $280.44
SPENCER KAREN Advisor, City Manager’s Office $100,285.02 $251.14
STARR JACOB Firefighter $101,035.28 $219.66
STEFANKA RANDY Maintenance Contract Coordinator $101,709.92 $224.28
STEINBACH ALBERT Senior Internal Auditor $112,131.34 $280.44
STEWART YVONNE Fire Communications Officer $102,026.24 $225.56
STICKEL ROBERT Application Portfolio Coordinator-Hansen $106,449.50 $277.05
STUART BRUCE D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
SULLIVAN JOHN District Chief, Fire $130,755.38 $269.45
SULLIVAN MIKE Fire Captain $102,281.92 $284.22
SULZ-MCDOWELL INGRID Manager, Development Planning $117,808.22 $280.44
SYKES CHRISTOPHER Fire Captain $107,439.27 $279.14
SZCZEPANSKI STEFAN Manager, Park Development $122,553.08 $306.39
TAEGER CLYDE Application Developer $102,229.75 $224.28
TAPLEY TIMOTHY Fire Captain $104,861.16 $256.26
TAYLOR MARK A. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $270.92
TAYLOR STUART Manager, Operational Planning $127,957.70 $313.86
TIBERIA MARIO Fire Captain $102,281.92 $238.56
TIEN SAMSON H. Systems Support Services Coordinator $112,131.34 $280.44
TIFFIN RANDY Communications Officer $128,329.05 $238.56
TIMUKAS PAUL M. Fire Captain $105,525.54 $261.04
TONER STEVEN District Chief, Fire $128,764.14 $283.70
TRAIN MARK A. Captain, Fire Suppression $109,998.28 $270.40
TRETROP

City of Mississauga SUNSHINE LIST: Even Transit bus drivers can make over $100,000 a year.

April 5th, 2011  

Just a quick quote from the April 1, 2011 Toronto Star article, “Many more public servants earning six figures in Ontario”. Rob Ferguson and Tanya Talaga (Queen’s Park Bureau) write:

The number of Ontario public servants earning $100,000 or more now equals the population of Sarnia as the “sunshine list” grew 11 per cent last year.

There are 71,478 provincial, municipal and public sector workers — from hydro and hospital executives to bureaucrats, political staffers and cops — beating the threshold set by former Progressive Conservative premier Mike Harris in 1995, according to figures released Thursday by the finance ministry.

Have to say, seeing the names of some of the City of Mississauga’s most unethical unaccountable Corporate hacks raking in a 100-thou plus benefits (and what do they get for pensions?) has frothed me to fury.

So. Once again, the video complete with transcript.

City of Mississauga SUNSHINE LIST:  Even Transit bus drivers can make over $100,000 a year. (4:11 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]
[
Regarding loss of $731,485 in transit Infoplace –the result of the city not following its own rules for collecting payment for tickets]

Mayor Hazel McCallion (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

—It’s not as bad as the one in Toronto. But it’s bad.

Changes made without due authority. In the process.

So that’s all I want to say.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

(inaudible) —Madam Mayor, to your point. The whole episode is shameful.

And the aspect that is concerning me more and more is, you know I don’t know how many of us in government have realized but there starts to be seen this disconnect between us privileged ones in government —that wasn’t the case fifty years ago, when you went in government you got paid less etc etc.

And yet, you know, the government’s out now —folks that make a hundred thousand dollars and my constituents looking for a job see that —Boy police constable’s make is a hundred thousand dollars with their overtime. And transit drivers, some of them make a hundred thousand dollars with their overtime.

And here I am, Joe Citizen, struggling to get ahead, and I’ve lost benefits, I’ve lost my job if I’m an auto worker, taking hits at various times coming in for extra work and not getting paid for it.

Struggling to pay taxes. And then they see episodes like this. And what explanation do we have?

[DIP TO BLACK]

This speaks to the issue of the future. Our taxpayers will not put up with this any more.

And the people they’re going to look at isn’t you —they’re looking at us. And then we turn around and look at you.

And George Carlson, our good friend and colleague on Council has a very good point. And I was wishing he’d be wrong, but we’d better be cognizant that he’s right.

“All the animals look at each other differently when the watering hole dries out.”

We still have some water in our hole. A lot of my constituents don’t.

We owe them a better level of service than what they received over this debacle.

But Madam Mayor, we’ll speak some more to it in-camera. Thank you.

Councillor Pat Mullin, Chair (Audit Committee, May 11, 2009)

Okay. Motion of receipt then?  Councillor Iannicca. All those in favour? Carried.

Audio: Audit Committee McCallion/Iannicca repeated with MUSIC: Caspian & Grafhic -Matrix Shit
Video: SCROLL of selected City of Mississauga employees on SUNSHINE LIST 2010

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

What follows is a complete SUNSHINE LIST of City of Mississauga employees making $100,000 or more for 2010 followed by the 2006 SUNSHINE LIST for comparative purposes. RED indicates City Staff researched through Freedom of Information or video.

City of Mississauga Salary Disclosure 2011 (Disclosure for 2010)
Surname Given Name Position Salary Paid Taxable Benefits
ADKINS RODNEY R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
AHMED NADIR Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
ALEXANDER WENDY A. Director, Transportation & Infrastructure Planning $148,842.08 $372.21
ALLELY RICHARD J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
AMRING SUSAN M. Manager, Economic Development $130,517.57 $313.86
ANDERSON SCOTT W. Senior Project Manager, Transportation $131,842.96 $704.26
APLIN GLENN V. Fire Captain $108,768.15 $258.96
BACON DENIS P. Manager, Parks $102,029.97 $244.32
BAKER JANICE City Manager and Chief Administrative Officer $245,864.06 $8,358.64
BALCHANDANI RAJAN Manager, Energy Management $108,739.51 $271.41
BALL MARILYN Director, Development & Design $147,881.38 $372.21
BANIC SONJA Manager, Public Affairs $112,300.64 $280.44
BAQILEH BASSEM Transit Operator $100,497.59 $299.79
BARRETT MURRAY A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $258.96
BARRETT STEPHEN R. Manager, Transportation Asset Management $115,683.24 $287.01
BARTER TOM C. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $244.40
BASTERFIELD MICHAEL D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $260.52
BATE ANDREW Supervisor, Traffic Operations $111,357.70 $207.15
BEARD DAVID M. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $247.52
BEAUPARLANT MARK Manager, Corporate Financial Services $128,730.01 $313.23
BEHARRY ROCHARD Legal Counsel $128,732.04 $259.86
BENCH MARY ELLEN City Solicitor $178,468.52 $429.27
BERNARDI DINO Captain, Fire Suppression $110,884.42 $260.52
BIRD BRIAN G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $270.92
BLATT DIANA F. Workforce Planning & Analysis Specialist $115,154.61 $216.48
BODNAR GREG Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $111,629.36 $244.32
BORGATTI RICHARD W. Fire Captain $107,612.63 $264.68
BOWSLAUGH ROBERT L. Manager, Facilities Maintenance $105,938.49 $264.90
BOYCE DEREK Manager, Business Planning $104,952.37 $262.38
BOYD MAX W. Capital Project Manager $112,131.34 $280.44
BRADLEY SEAN Fire Captain $102,590.21 $254.68
BREAULT BRENDA R. Commissioner, Corporate Services &Treasurer $186,385.74 $9,486.00
BREUER DAGMAR Capital Project Manager $114,001.46 $280.44
BREWDA KATIE Account Representative, Community Services $108,094.86 $62.40
BRODERICK DAVID Manager, Marina Operations $101,335.28 $244.32
BROWN BETTE Communications Officer, Fire $115,820.44 $250.64
BROWN JAMIE Manager, Sponsorship & Corporate Development $101,887.38 $244.32
BUCKLEY FRANK M. Manager, Parks $112,443.10 $244.32
BUCKSTEIN ELAINE Director, Enforcement $148,842.08 $372.21
BUGDEN KEVIN Assistant Deputy Chief $113,312.72 $238.60
BULGER JAMES E. Fire Captain $105,414.86 $274.56
BURKE PAUL G. Fire Captain $104,894.94 $254.80
BURNS ROBERT S. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
BURT SUSAN Director, Arts & Culture $153,561.43 $372.21
CALLIGARIS JOSEPH Fire Captain $102,281.92 $248.96
CALVERT CLIFF A. District Chief, Fire $111,235.02 $264.06
CALVERT JOHN D. Director, Policy Planning $148,842.08 $372.21
CAMILLERI TIMOTHY A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $259.48
CARR BRUCE Director, Strategic Community Initiatives $154,685.08 $372.21
CESARIO SILVIO Manager, Maintenance & Operations $127,673.27 $313.86
CHALLINOR JASON Fire Captain $102,281.92 $291.60
CHAN STEPHEN Manager, Staffing & Development $116,533.22 $280.44
CHANCEY DOUGLAS T. Fire Captain $112,260.90 $286.52
CHIN DONOFRIO HELEN F. Data Architect $114,416.93 $280.44
CHONG DIANE Project Leader $110,827.70 $280.44
CHUNG TONY Transit Operator $102,542.67 $299.79
CIRELLO JIM Manager, Financial Services, Corporate Services $117,985.90 $293.72
CLARK JOHN A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $271.44
CLARKE JOHN P. Supervisor, Traffic Signal & Street Lights $113,585.43 $279.21
CLEMENT ROGER Chief Fire Prevention Officer $110,511.44 $255.22
COFFEY KEVIN Fire Captain $102,423.62 $238.56
COLES SUZANNE Area Manager, Library Services $106,391.52 $266.02
CONNOLLY MARK R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $268.84
CONNOR JOHN DAVID Fire District Chief $127,857.84 $288.90
CORBET CHRISTOPHER Fire Captain $104,930.43 $293.06
CORCORAN RAYMOND M. Fire District Chief $128,702.87 $280.58
CUNNINGHAM CRAIG Fire Captain $104,487.14 $256.66
CURRY DARRELL Manager, Frank McKechnie Facility $101,435.90 $244.32
CUSUMANO LEO J. Manager, Inspection Services $116,533.22 $280.44
CZYRKA PAUL J. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $245.96
DAEUBER WILLIAM E. Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
DAMASO PAUL Manager Celebration Square $103,376.64 $251.76
DAUM RANDY Fire Captain $104,861.16 $281.22
DAVENPORT MARK Project Leader $112,131.34 $280.44
DAVIS ERIC V. Captain, Fire Prevention $107,535.04 $250.64
DAVOLI LUIGI Fire Captain $102,281.92 $318.76
DEAN GEORGE Fire District Chief $119,975.38 $322.18
DECOSTE STEPHEN D. Fire Captain $111,414.54 $282.88
DEDMAN KEALY Manager, Development Engineering $109,858.01 $285.81
DEJAK TOM A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $308.36
DELFINO GUSTAVO Manager, Service Development $112,004.53 $280.14
DELUCA DANIEL Plans Examiner, Fire $100,115.07 $228.60
DEMARTINI PETER G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DEMPSTER DAVID S. Fire Captain $105,063.80 $281.32
DENIKE TIMOTHY E. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DEVEAU DOUGLAS C. Captain, Fire Suppression $113,860.49 $244.40
DI MILLO IVANA Director, Communications $152,544.76 $370.65
DIETRICH ANGELA Manager, City Wide Planning $112,207.58 $280.44
DOCKENDORFF CASEY Assistant City Solicitor $113,700.12 $284.03
DOUGLAS ALEX A. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $287.04
DRAPER STEVEN D. Manager, Information Technology, Corporate Services $122,431.66 $305.73
DUBKOWSKI JAMES R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
DUFFY KEVIN J. Deputy Fire Chief $161,691.58 $871.57
DUNN ARLAND L. Fire Captain $108,608.85 $280.80
EBRAEMI FAWAD A. Project Manager $130,161.81 $316.05
EDWARDS ERICA Senior Buyer $110,586.86 $235.56
ELLIOTT ROBERT G. Manager, Projects $102,383.34 $255.48
ELLIOTT-SPENCER PATRICIA Director, Finance $164,230.75 $406.83
EMICK CRAIG Information Technology Auditor $107,532.79 $279.51
ENG SALLY P. Director, Internal Audit $151,763.58 $372.21
ENNAMORATO DANIEL Fire Captain $110,277.70 $244.40
EVANS JAMES Fire Captain $104,861.16 $249.40
FABRIS DIEGO City Arborist $102,453.86 $224.28
FARION CLIFTON Building Maintenance Coordinator $108,299.52 $253.16
FARRELL PATRICIA A. Planner $103,069.33 $224.28
FAYLE NORMAN Fire Captain $107,439.27 $260.00
FERRARA FELICE Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $117,829.56 $244.32
FINNIGAN TERENCE J. Fire Captain $110,032.04 $250.64
FLACK PAUL F. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $256.88
FLANIGAN MICHAEL B. Special Traffic Projects Leader $103,554.24 $258.66
FLEMING RANDY Training Officer, Fire $115,436.59 $230.76
FORD COLLIN Transit Operator $109,070.07 $149.79
FRANCIS LAWRENCE P. Fire Captain $105,443.35 $250.12
FROST MICKEY Manager, Transit Operations $137,043.35 $329.76
FUDGE JOSEPH Legal Counsel $139,389.85 $335.10
FULLERTON RUSS Transit Operator $115,374.37 $149.79
GAFFNEY SHAWN M. Fire District Chief $124,144.71 $308.26
GALAMINI DOMENIC Supervisor, Traffic Maintenance $116,931.26 $244.32
GALATI DOMENIC Maintenance Standards & Permits Supervisor $117,417.72 $238.71
GARNER RICHARD J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
GILMOUR MICHAEL S. Fire Captain $108,190.59 $255.32
GOLD GRAHAM Fire Captain $103,621.31 $246.88
GRAZIANO MARIA P. Database Administrator $112,139.69 $234.00
GREEN DANIEL G. District Chief, Fire $129,853.90 $316.46
GREEN GARY S. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $246.90
GREER CRYSTAL Director, Legislative Services & Clerk $153,224.33 $372.21
GRIFFITH MARG Project Leader $109,968.42 $280.44
HAGAN ANNEMARIE Manager, Museums $100,142.00 $244.32
HAGERMAN ALAN J. Fire Captain $105,193.35 $266.76
HAND WAYNE L Manager, Meadowvale & Erin Mills Arenas $102,838.82 $244.32
HARVEY ANDREW W. Manager, Rapid Transit and Parking $129,027.51 $313.86
HAWKINS JOHN Senior Inspector $100,924.74 $190.05
HEAD MICHAEL R. Fire Platoon Chief $127,850.59 $299.42
HEADRICK DARREN Enterprise System (SAP) Portfolio Coordinator $112,131.34 $280.44
HERRIDGE DONNA E. Manager, Financial Planning $128,147.32 $313.86
HICKS BRUCE Fire Captain $107,439.27 $308.88
HILL JOHN A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $258.96
HILLIS JAMES (aka Jamie) Manager, Security $112,131.34 $280.44
HILLS ALAN Fire Platoon Chief $124,599.12 $293.28
HINTON JAMES M. Acting Director, Enforcement $104,795.68 $262.31
HINTON JOHN F. Manager, Financial & Customer Service $104,669.77 $262.05
HIPGRAVE MARY A. Senior Internal Auditor $109,968.42 $280.44
HOLMES JAYNE Senior Project Manager $117,917.66 $294.24
HOMEVOH ERNEST Transit Operator $107,751.37 $199.79
HORVAT CAROL Executive Assistant, Mayor $101,658.64 $244.32
HULME HAL V. Supervisor, Survey & Inspection $108,817.66 $244.32
HUNTER PAUL D. Fire Platoon Chief $127,904.32 $299.42
IMPERIALE JOHN Manager, Information Technology, Community Services $121,826.55 $308.58
JACKSON ALLEN P. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
JACKSON JEFFREY Director, Revenue & Materiel Management $149,592.08 $372.21
JAMIESON RANDALL Project Manager, Community Services $110,105.19 $275.85
JAY MARTIN R. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $247.00
JEHU STEPHEN C. Fire Communications Operator $107,041.16 $218.62
JETHVA REKHA Manager, Planning and Integration $128,621.37 $313.86
JOHNSON FREDERIC C. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $283.92
KAMINO KEITH T. Senior Internal Auditor $101,043.30 $252.72
KAN LINCOLN Manager, Environmental Services $114,633.24 $287.01
KANAMALA SUNIL KUMAR Project Leader, Transit Facility Planning $100,378.33 $244.32
KEATING MIKE E. Manager, Transit Vehicle Maintenance $130,446.45 $313.86
KELLS HELEN M. Systems Specialist $106,594.18 $197.22
KELLY ANDREW Fire Captain $109,193.68 $299.52
KELLY LORI A. Manager, Strategic Community Initiatives $125,857.89 $308.91
KEMPF STEVEN G. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $265.20
KENEALY ROY Superintendent, Operational Support $103,782.41 $259.86
KENT GARY Director, Corporate Strategy and Innovation $154,685.08 $372.21
KERNAN PAUL Fire Captain $114,314.26 $248.56
KETTLE HAROLD J. Technical Specialist $104,664.75 $244.32
KEUPER DALTON INGRID Library Community Development Specialist $100,378.33 $244.32
KIRKPATRICK ROBERT B. Fire Captain $109,241.18 $278.62
KNIGHT MARLENE Manager, Materiel Management $125,587.45 $313.86
KOPAMEES ALAR Fire Captain $104,861.16 $267.80
KREMER RONALD Supervisor, Networking Service $101,910.17 $254.91
KRISMAN GRANT M. Fire Captain $103,760.25 $249.08
LAING DEBORAH Fire Communications Officer $111,365.67 $238.56
LAING GREGORY B. Deputy, Training & Prevention $164,745.48 $1,822.75
LAMANNA SABINA Manager, Human Resources, Community Services $109,378.64 $273.63
LAURENCE BRIAN J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $256.88
LAW WENDY Legal Counsel $122,849.49 $345.32
LAWRENCE JACK Director, Information Technology $148,842.08 $372.21
LEE FRANK Manager, Information Technology, Planning and Building $119,058.87 $297.99
LEI GUANG Transit Operator $106,940.61 $149.79
LEVESQUE ROBERT Capital Project Manager $112,131.34 $280.44
LIBOIRON ROBERT L. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
LIN YUNGFU Project Leader $112,131.34 $729.84
LOHUIS JOHN Director, Recreation & Parks $154,685.08 $372.21
LONGMUIR GAVIN Manager, Urban Forestry $102,508.46 $244.32
MACDONALD DEBBIE Manager, Shared Services $112,317.51 $280.66
MACDONALD HEATHER Director, Business Services $154,685.08 $372.21
MACEACHERN DAVID Training Officer, Fire $115,313.27 $244.40
MACKENZIE CHRISTINA Manager, Creative Services $101,335.28 $244.32
MACKINNON KAREN G. Communications Coordinator, Fire $121,577.94 $268.92
MAGGIO ALBERT J. Fire Captain $107,543.60 $250.64
MAJCHER LAURIE E. Manager, Management Consulting $125,587.45 $313.86
MAJOR NANCY Manager, 311 Call Centre $116,402.42 $141.00
MAKURAT ROBERT Fire Captain $102,281.92 $241.16
MALO STEPHANE Fire Captain $102,356.33 $244.70
MANCUSO GIUSEPPINA Project Manager, Elections $104,880.52 $197.22
MANN JOHN Fire Captain $102,281.92 $253.64
MANSFIELD DOROTHY E. Manager, Community Services $115,432.75 $280.44
MARCUCCI DAVID Manager, Planning & Heritage $121,270.70 $303.27
MARINOFF GEOFF Director, Transit $176,515.42 $424.75
MARION DAVID Manager, Geomatics $137,043.68 $329.76
MARLAND RUTH Team Leader, Long Term Planning $109,358.32 $244.32
MARSHALL GREIG Fire Captain $104,894.93 $250.12
MARTIN LYNN Systems Support Specialist $122,772.78 $224.28
MASLIWEC MICHAEL N. Manager, Financial Services, Transportation and Works $125,587.45 $313.86
MATHESON SHAWN Fire Division Chief, Training $121,329.87 $303.27
MAYO MARY Manager, Enterprise Systems $125,777.07 $313.86
MCADAM PHILIP D. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $262.08
MCCALLION HAZEL M. Mayor $136,640.92 $1,648.90
MCCUTCHEON STEPHEN J. Fire Captain $107,578.37 $263.12
MCDOUGALL JOHN A. Fire Chief $167,913.56 $3,481.00
MCLEAN MARCELL L. Fire Communications Operator $111,307.30 $212.38
MCNALLY MARTIN I. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.84
MCPHAIL LARRY J. Platoon Chief $128,659.96 $299.42
MCPHAIL ROBERT Captain, Fire Suppression $108,768.15 $250.64
MEEHAN DOUGLAS E. Manager, Prosecutions $116,533.22 $280.44
MELVILLE ANDREW D. Fire Captain $105,063.80 $264.68
MENEZES ERIC Supervisor, Streetlighting $113,265.82 $214.38
MESIH CONNIE D. Manager, Property Assessment & Taxation $130,767.57 $313.86
MICHAUD DAVE H. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.84
MICHELUCCI ENIO Contract Administrator, Trees $104,051.55 $222.22
MINKOWSKI MICHAL Legal Counsel $139,389.85 $335.10
MITCHAM PAUL ARTHUR Commissioner, Community Services $186,385.74 $10,890.76
MONTGOMERY WILLIAM R. Fire Captain $108,768.15 $255.84
MOONEY JAMES Systems Technician, Fire $101,422.74 $236.90
MOORE ALLAN J. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $314.60
MORAES FERNANDO Project Manager, Architectural $103,259.76 $258.30
MORLEY JAMES D. Manager, Client Services $119,632.41 $299.19
MOULTON ALAN Fire Captain $108,768.15 $255.84
MUJAWAZ AHMAD Project Manager, Structural $109,149.63 $273.33
MURPHY ANNE M. Area Manager, Library Services $118,795.17 $288.49
MURPHY LAWRENCE Manager, Court Administration $112,131.34 $280.44
MUSIAL HENRY Fire Captain $119,051.96 $254.80
NADON RAYMOND A. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $280.80
NASATO PAUL Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $104,214.27 $234.30
NG NORMAN Supervisor, Customer Service $112,131.34 $280.44
NISHIHAMA WAYNE G. Manager, Urban Design $112,131.34 $280.44
NOBLE RALPH A. Fire Captain – South – B $114,470.92 $250.64
NORWOOD STEPHEN T. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $259.48
NUCIFORA GINO Captain, Fire Prevention $119,104.29 $244.40
OFFLESS KEVIN Senior Inspector $101,379.30 $190.05
O’HALLORAN CAREY L. Manager, Infrastructure Management Systems $107,805.70 $280.44
ORMOND MARK A. Fire District Chief $124,105.78 $294.74
OSBORNE BRENDA Manager, Environmental Management $105,970.00 $221.97
OUTTRIM RYAN Firefighter $101,735.12 $248.36
OWEN KENNETH Director, Facility & Property Management $153,224.33 $372.21
PALA ZELJKO Transit Operator $113,333.05 $229.79
PALLADINE PAUL Supervisor, Area, Transportation and Works $109,946.75 $239.04
PARDY ROGER Fire Captain $104,861.16 $254.28
PARISI PAUL Fire Captain $102,351.44 $249.48
PARSONS PETER C. Senior Inspector $102,250.56 $190.05
PARTIPILO JOSEPH Senior Inspector $113,226.28 $181.62
PASSFIELD GORDON L. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $255.32
PATEL KESHWER Manager, Financial Services, community Services $115,050.09 $288.00
PATERSON EDWARD D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $267.28
PATON CAROLYN Corporate Lead Business Planning & Performance Management $106,559.78 $244.32
PAVAN LESLEY M. Manager, Development, Planning and Building $106,839.59 $277.05
PEARCE RICHARD Enterprise Geographic Information System Project Leader $115,016.93 $280.44
PENTELIUK DAVID Area Manager, Library Services $103,240.24 $258.66
PERKINS ROBERT Building Services & Operations Supervisor $110,453.70 $213.12
PERRY CAROL Tax System Coordinator $109,968.42 $280.44
PETOVELLO LARRY F. Director, Economic Development $151,763.58 $10,838.64
PETRI MATHIAS Building Services & Operations Supervisor $112,616.29 $222.42
PETROSONIAK STEVE D. Fire Captain $107,682.70 $255.32
PHANEUF PATRICK J. Superintendent, Operations $116,533.22 $280.44
PHELPS GREGORY G. Plans Examination Officer, Fire $112,540.95 $258.74
PICCOLO JOHN Project Manager, Electrical $112,131.34 $280.44
PICO FERMIN Manager, Transit Business Systems $122,360.37 $294.24
PIETTE LAURA M. Director, Planning, Development & Business Services $151,257.43 $370.35
PIRES PAUL Transit Operator $103,319.65 $209.79
PITUSHKA JOSEPH Director, Engineering & Works $148,842.08 $372.21
POGUE JOHN D. Manager, Burnhamthorpe & Tomken Facilities $101,741.30 $244.32
POITRAS RAY L. Manager, Development $114,582.28 $280.44
POLETTO MARIO Captain, Fire Suppression $111,685.74 $288.60
POUNDER DONNA E. Manager, Training & Development $101,335.28 $244.32
POWELL MARTIN Commissioner, Transportation and Works $186,385.74 $12,186.32
RAJA MANJIT Senior Database Administrator $100,015.26 $244.32
RAMER ALLEN Captain, Fire Suppression $101,657.20 $233.88
RECK KIMBERLY A. District Manager, Community Services $110,763.91 $277.05
REIACH WILLIAM C. Fire Captain $105,525.54 $262.60
REID MAVIS Manager, Compensation & Benefits $111,935.79 $279.84
REYNOLDS MICHAEL W. Fire Captain $107,577.69 $250.64
RICHARD PAUL Fire Captain $109,904.79 $284.44
RIDDELL LOUISE ANN Manager, Labour Relations $126,522.41 $303.90
RIDLEY LAWRENCE Firefighter $116,630.10 $219.66
RIVERS DEBORAH A. Manager, Human Resources, Corporate Services $112,116.68 $279.84
ROBERTS NIGEL Manager, Departmental Systems $109,773.68 $274.29
ROBEZNIEKS AGRIS Director, Building Services & Chief Build Official $154,685.08 $372.21
ROEDER ED Superintendent, Transit Maintenance $111,921.24 $279.84
ROLLINS GARY S. District Chief, Fire $130,882.67 $294.10
ROSE DUILIO A. Manager, Animal Services $101,125.15 $244.32
ROWSELL JEFF Information Technology Specialist $103,230.32 $223.98
ROY DARRELL G. Fire Captain $105,636.34 $252.72
RUFFINI LORENZO Strategic Leader $124,749.89 $311.37
RUSNOV DIANA Manager, Development $114,582.28 $280.44
RYDZEWSKI JOHN B. Director, Hershey Group $148,842.08 $372.21
SAJECKI EDWARD Commissioner, Planning & Building $186,385.74 $9,711.40
SANDERSON RONALD Manager, Realty Services $106,625.45 $210.48
SASAKI ROBERT H. Manager, Transportation Planning $129,285.04 $313.86
SAVERY DOUGLAS Fire Captain $107,439.27 $270.92
SAVINI EZIO Manager, Capital Works $130,517.57 $313.86
SCARANGELLA MICHAEL A. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $347.36
SCOTT TIMOTHY Captain, Fire Suppression $114,907.39 $261.56
SCRACE DAVID G. Senior Inspector $115,427.36 $190.05
SHAO YIDAN Database Administrator $104,530.06 $235.20
SHARPE KEN J. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $297.44
SHETH RAJ Manager, Facilities Planning & Development $138,855.76 $333.87
SHIN DAVID Project Leader $116,533.22 $280.44
SHIRLEY MICHAEL Transit Operator $100,356.79 $209.79
SINGH NAVIN Transit Operator $105,184.67 $299.79
SLACK SHAWN Director, Customer & Business Services $146,853.54 $366.96
SMITH GEOFF Team Leader, Park Assets $102,130.21 $244.32
SMITH GORDON R. Fire District Chief $120,808.37 $280.58
SMITH R. DENNIS Fire Captain $107,439.27 $253.24
SNOW ROBERT Fire Captain $104,861.16 $244.40
SONI VIPULCHANDR Transit Operator $105,849.77 $249.79
SOULLIERE WILLIAM P. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $257.92
SOUSA ALCIDES V. Maintenance Project Manager $116,533.22 $280.44
SOUSA DREW Manager Employee Health Services $101,335.47 $244.32
SPAGNOLO FRANK Manager, Plan Examination Service $115,432.75 $280.44
SPENCER KAREN Advisor, City Manager’s Office $100,285.02 $251.14
STARR JACOB Firefighter $101,035.28 $219.66
STEFANKA RANDY Maintenance Contract Coordinator $101,709.92 $224.28
STEINBACH ALBERT Senior Internal Auditor $112,131.34 $280.44
STEWART YVONNE Fire Communications Officer $102,026.24 $225.56
STICKEL ROBERT Application Portfolio Coordinator-Hansen $106,449.50 $277.05
STUART BRUCE D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
SULLIVAN JOHN District Chief, Fire $130,755.38 $269.45
SULLIVAN MIKE Fire Captain $102,281.92 $284.22
SULZ-MCDOWELL INGRID Manager, Development Planning $117,808.22 $280.44
SYKES CHRISTOPHER Fire Captain $107,439.27 $279.14
SZCZEPANSKI STEFAN Manager, Park Development $122,553.08 $306.39
TAEGER CLYDE Application Developer $102,229.75 $224.28
TAPLEY TIMOTHY Fire Captain $104,861.16 $256.26
TAYLOR MARK A. Captain, Fire Suppression $104,861.16 $270.92
TAYLOR STUART Manager, Operational Planning $127,957.70 $313.86
TIBERIA MARIO Fire Captain $102,281.92 $238.56
TIEN SAMSON H. Systems Support Services Coordinator $112,131.34 $280.44
TIFFIN RANDY Communications Officer $128,329.05 $238.56
TIMUKAS PAUL M. Fire Captain $105,525.54 $261.04
TONER STEVEN District Chief, Fire $128,764.14 $283.70
TRAIN MARK A. Captain, Fire Suppression $109,998.28 $270.40
TRETROP SVEN Manager, Information Technology, Transportation and Works $130,517.57 $313.86
TRUONG KENNETH Capital Project Manager $114,005.13 $279.51
TUDINO DOMENIC Legal Counsel $134,124.61 $335.10
TURNER DOUGLAS E. Fire Captain $107,716.79 $250.64
TURZA STEVE F. Fire Captain $105,013.14 $265.72
TYNDALL LARRY Portal Team Leader $108,713.04 $271.77
UBA ROBIN Manager, Project Management Support Office $116,533.22 $280.44
UNDERWOOD ROBIN D. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
UNWIN REYNOLD C. Fire Captain $104,911.82 $257.40
VAN ZUTPHEN PAUL M. Fire District Chief $122,024.54 $306.06
VARCOE CHRISTOPHER Fire Captain $102,281.92 $240.64
VARELA SHELLI Fire Captain $103,895.03 $243.76
VASEY MARK C. Fire Captain $104,861.16 $273.84
VESEY MARY LYNN Organizational Effectiveness Consultant $105,601.93 $260.52
VUKOVIC ANTUN A. Head Of Mechanical Division, Fire $116,327.44 $258.74
WAIGHT ELIZABETH Legal Counsel $134,124.61 $335.10
WALSH BRIAN P. Division Chief, Fleet, Facilities & Equipment $130,847.83 $327.36
WARD ROBERT Fire Captain $102,281.92 $246.88
WATTS JOHN Fire Captain $102,331.33 $238.56
WATTS TIM Senior Inspector $108,586.52 $190.05
WAYOW KENDALL Project Manager $107,585.98 $268.65
WEBSTER BARBARA Audit Associate $100,103.51 $248.04
WELLS EDWARD R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $268.32
WELSH ALEXANDER K. Fire Captain $107,508.48 $254.80
WHITELEY JASON Training Officer, Fire $107,488.32 $238.56
WICKENS ANDREW Manager, Parks $130,517.57 $313.86
WILCOX JOHN R. Fire District Chief $128,547.90 $280.58
WILLIAMS BRUCE A. Manager, Fleet $128,052.51 $313.86
WILLIAMS GEORGE F. Training Officer, Fire $118,319.55 $250.64
WILLIAMS ROBERT G. District Manager, Community Services $129,285.04 $313.86
WILLOCK SHARON Director, Human Resources $159,744.39 $393.15
WILSON CARL R. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
WILSON CRAIG Database Administrator $104,154.84 $244.32
WILSON-PEEBLES ANDREA Legal Counsel $103,219.42 $258.66
WILTON WILLIAM P. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $262.08
WONG LINDA Project Leader $105,689.41 $280.44
WRIGHT GEOFF Director, Transportation Project Office and Business Services $137,271.11 $343.08
WRIGHT KEN C. Fire Captain $107,439.27 $250.64
XU JASON JIAN Transit Operator $101,322.87 $249.79
YANG CHARLES Special Projects Coordinator $125,587.45 $313.86
YEUNG SIU H. Supervisor, Technology Support Service $116,324.86 $291.39
YOUNG STUART Manager, Parks $107,298.93 $244.32
ZUECH ROBERTO Legal Counsel $134,124.61 $335.10
ZUWA TERRY A Fire Captain $104,861.16 $247.00

For comparison.

City of Mississauga Salary Disclosure 2007 (Disclosure for 2006)
Surname Given Name Position Salary Paid Taxable Benefits
ALEXANDER WENDY A Director, Transportation & Infrastructure Planning $132,730.44 $446.88
AMRING SUSAN M Manager, Economic Development $114,789.02 $379.68
ANDERSON SCOTT W Manager, Capital $113,573.94 $375.48
ARBUCKLE BRADLEY G District Fire Chief $112,314.16 $306.04
BACQUIE MARILYN Director, Development & Design $123,260.11 $427.56
BAKER JANICE City Manager $232,946.42 $5,245.82
BECK ROBERT G District Fire Chief $109,508.57 $306.04
BENCH MARY ELLEN City Solicitor $159,013.29 $515.34
BODNAR GREG Supervisor, Area $100,335.76 $284.76
BOWSLAUGH ROBERT L Supervisor, Maintenance Operations $102,398.71 $286.55
BOYCE DAVID J District Fire Chief $108,383.53 $306.04
BREAULT BRENDA R Commissioner, Corporate Services $163,680.41 $5,986.14
BUCKSTEIN ELAINE Director, Enforcement $132,880.61 $446.88
BUGDEN KEVIN Chief Of Planning & Administration $102,400.54 $327.46
BURT SUSAN Director, Business Services $117,269.76 $395.22
CALVERT JOHN D Director, Policy Planning $138,072.01 $446.88
CAMPBELL CHRISTINE M Manager, Financial Services $102,293.99 $336.84
CARR J.BRUCE Director, Strategic Planning & Business Services $137,822.02 $446.88
CESARIO SILVIO Manager, Capital Works $113,332.88 $376.74
CHALMERS RUSSELL H Platoon Chief, Fire $116,023.88 $334.74
CHAN STEPHEN Manager, Staffing & Development $101,874.84 $336.84
CHOW TAI-MING Manager, Information Technology $102,715.42 $346.08
CONNOR JOHN DAVID District Fire Chief $114,294.72 $306.04
CUNNINGHAM WILLIAM Director, Transportation & Works $140,726.52 $465.36
DAEUBER WILLIAM E Project Leader $100,407.21 $336.84
DE GROSBOIS EDWARD Director, Business Services $117,091.69 $410.76
DI MILLO IVANA Director, Communications $113,245.66 $381.78
DORVAL PHILIP L Captain, Fire Suppression $105,402.90 $245.84
DRAYCOTT ERIC H Director, Human Resources $132,630.61 $446.88
DUFFY KEVIN J Assistant Deputy Fire Chief $121,284.53 $376.46
ENG SALLY P Director, Internal Audit $122,949.61 $414.54
FERRARA FELICE Supervisor, Area $108,121.66 $280.70
FROST MICKEY Manager, Transit Operations $114,099.71 $377.16
FUDGE JOSEPH Legal Counsel $119,516.33 $401.94
GABREK FRANK Firefighter $106,598.99 $0.00
GAFFNEY SHAWN M District Fire Chief $106,239.96 $306.04
GREEN DANIEL G District Fire Chief $114,136.94 $306.04
GREER CRYSTAL Director, Legislative Services & Clerk $134,696.48 $445.20
GRIFFITH MARG Project Leader $100,020.49 $336.84
HARVEY ANDREW W Manager, Traffic Engineering & Operations $102,369.57 $344.40
HAWTHORNE GLEN G Manager, Developmental Systems $111,058.93 $374.64
HEAD MICHAEL R Platoon Chief, Fire $116,023.87 $334.74
HERRIDGE DONNA E Manager, Financial Planning & Policy $110,609.30 $372.54
HILLS ALAN Captain, Fire $121,479.68 $270.06
HOLMES JAYNE Senior Project Manager $100,315.75 $344.40
HUNTER PAUL D Platoon Chief, Fire $116,023.87 $334.74
JACKSON JEFFREY Director, Revenue $132,880.61 $446.88
JETHVA REKHA Manager, Planning & Integration $117,591.41 $380.24
JOHNSON BEATRICE Communications Officer $100,996.77 $270.06
KEATING MIKE E Manager, Transit Vehicle Maintenance $105,676.61 $356.16
KENT GARY CHARLES Director, Strategic Initiatives $122,563.41 $412.86
KNIGHT MARLENE Manager, Materiel Management $114,099.71 $377.16
LAING GREGORY B District Fire Chief $112,122.17 $306.04
LAING IAN Assistant Deputy Fire Chief $111,861.05 $377.02
LAW WENDY Legal Counsel $103,475.66 $348.60
LAWRENCE JACK Director, Information Technology $135,226.31 $451.02
LOHUIS JOHN Director, Recreation & Parks $135,226.31 $446.88
MACCANNELL GORDON A District Fire Chief $110,112.32 $252.84
MACKINNON KAREN G Communications Co-Ordinator, Fire $106,046.69 $293.72
MANSFIELD DOROTHY E Manager, Library Administration $101,874.84 $336.84
MARCHESE DOMINIC Capital Project Manager $119,324.05 $336.84
MARION DAVID Manager, Geomatics $126,289.89 $377.16
MASLIWEC MICHAEL N Manager, Financial Services $114,625.35 $379.26
MATHESON SHAWN Chief of Training $110,868.76 $351.12
MCCALLION HAZEL Mayor $124,004.23 $2,283.33
MCCASLIN DOUGLAS H Manager, Realty Services $109,541.51 $368.34
MCDOUGALL JOHN A Deputy Fire Chief $144,998.10 $2,215.03
MCKEOWN DOUGLAS W District Fire Chief $111,494.03 $306.04
MCPHAIL LARRY J Platoon Chief, Fire $113,893.91 $334.74
MESIH CONNIE D Manager, Property & Assessment $116,539.89 $377.16
MICHELUCCI ENIO Contract Administrator, Trees $102,185.57 $235.71
MILLS DONALD M Director, Library Services $132,630.61 $5,876.76
MINKOWSKI MICHAL Legal Counsel $121,855.37 $401.94
MITCHAM PAUL ARTHUR Commissioner, Community Services $165,913.53 $6,468.72
MOORE SHARON L Manager, Library Services $101,874.84 $336.84
MORDEN GARRY W Fire Chief $156,221.88 $1,718.44
NISHIHAMA WAYNE G Manager, Design Team $100,119.32 $338.76
OATES JOHN D Manager, Permit Administration & Zone Administration $109,022.43 $353.64
ORMOND MARK A District Fire Chief $107,103.84 $305.48
OWEN KENNETH Director, Facilities & Property Management $132,630.61 $446.88
PETOVELLO LARRY F Director, Economic Development $134,687.87 $5,798.12
PIETTE LAURA M District Manager, Community Services $109,877.05 $370.44
PITUSHKA JOSEPH J Director, Engineering & Works $132,730.44 $446.88
POITRAS RAY L Manager, Development Team South $100,711.46 $334.98
POWELL C-MARTIN M Commissioner, Transportation & Works $172,407.69 $6,397.09
REICHSTEIN RODNEY A Manager, Client Services-Information Technology $111,550.05 $375.90
REYNOLDS HEATHER Director, Organizational Wellness & Business Services $137,822.01 $447.00
RIDDELL LOUISE ANN Manager, Labour Relations $103,830.36 $336.84
ROBEZNIEKS AGRIS Director, Building & Chief Building Officer $137,822.01 $446.88
ROSSINI ROBERTO Director, Finance $143,447.24 $473.76
RYDZEWSKI JOHN B Director, Hershey Group $132,078.42 $443.10
SAJECKI EDWARD R Commissioner, Planning & Building $169,160.61 $6,130.35
SASAKI ROBERT H Manager, Transportation Planning $114,099.71 $377.16
SAVINI EZIO Manager, Development Construction & Technical Services $111,496.91 $373.80
SLACK SHAWN Director, Customer Service Strategy $115,782.95 $375.48
SPAGNOLO FRANK Manager, Building, Engineering And Inspections $103,830.36 $338.87
SULLIVAN TIM J District Fire Chief $100,829.25 $276.64
SULZ-MCDOWELL INGRID Manager, Development Team Central $104,080.36 $336.84
TERMINESI OZZIE P Manager, Development Engineering $106,969.20 $353.64
TIEN SAMSON H Systems Support Services Co-Ordinator $102,074.84 $336.84
TIFFIN RANDY Communications Operator $104,147.13 $234.71
TOPPS TERRY E Superintendent, Transit Operations $108,091.21 $350.84
TUDINO DOMENIC Legal Counsel $119,516.33 $401.94
VAN ZUTPHEN PAUL M District Fire Chief $107,604.66 $306.04
VUKOVIC ANTUN A Head of Mechanical Division, Fire $105,779.60 $282.52
WALSH BRIAN P Chief Inspector $114,064.82 $351.82
WATTS TIM Senior Inspector, Cupe $107,496.38 $209.30
WILCOX JOHN R District Fire Chief $101,416.59 $270.76
WILCOX RICHARD F District Fire Chief $111,084.58 $306.04
WILLIAMS BRUCE A Manager, Fleet $105,861.03 $357.00
WILLIAMS GEORGE F Training Officer, Fire $106,109.02 $270.76
WILLIAMS ROBERT G District Manager, Community Services $114,099.71 $377.16
YEUNG SIU H Systems Architect $100,256.35 $336.00
ZINGARO JOHN Legal Counsel $122,182.72 $406.14

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

TORONTO STAR

MISSISSAUGAWATCH nominates Peel poverty activist, Edna Toth for “Citizen of the Year”. (Hazel McCallion weighs in.)

March 20th, 2011  

We’ve created this video in response to the Mississauga News article, “Looking for the city’s top citizen”.

The Mississauga News writes:

The search is on for Mississauga’s next Citizen of the Year…

…A person can be considered a candidate for Citizen of the Year based on their outstanding efforts over a number of years. Nominees must be age 19 or older and residents in good standing.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH has nominated Edna Toth, poverty activist and Chair of the Peel Poverty Action Group. Because no one ever listens to us, we’ll enlist Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion to speak on Edna Toth’s behalf.

So, here’s the video complete with transcript.

Peel poverty activist, Edna Toth for “Citizen of the Year”. Hazel McCallion weighs in. (3:13 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]
Music: Brown Eyes (modified), Fleetwood Mac

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

I believe it is the right of every Canadian to have a roof over their head.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

Thank you for your dedication. You’ve been a leader in this. You haven’t given up and you’re going to win some day, I can tell you. Because we must respond.

Thank you, Edna.

[Subtitle. Hazel McCallion on POVERTY IN PEEL: the BACKGROUND]

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

—we at the local level have got to recognize that it’s —I’m not proud as a member of Regional Council or the Mayor of the City of Mississauga to say that there are 21,000 on the waiting list for social housing in Peel.

I think that’s something—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council applauding whispers)

Good for her.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

—secondly on Saturday when we welcomed the, uh, Sunday night when we welcomed the Queen at the airport, Emil Kolb and I had a chat with Mr. Flaherty, the Minister, saying that unemployment is rising greatly in the Region of Peel.

Emil says that the figures are extremely high.

So now we have a major unemployment situation and we have the social housing needs. That means that there’s going to be more —more demand for social housing. With the unemployment.

So, we’ve got a problem.

And I think we should be spending our taxpayers’ money wisely in regard to try to solve it. I don’t know what the solution is.

Yes, I do know what the solution is. I believe it is the right of every Canadian to have a roof over their head.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council whispers)

Yes!

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

That means the Federal government must get involved.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council whispers)

Yes!

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

And unfortunately it was —the Provinces asked to take over social housing. They asked for it. Especially Quebec was the leader of it. The Federal government agreed that it should be transferred to the municipali—to the provinces.

Unfortunately under the Harris government they downloaded it to the municipalities in Ontario only. All other provinces are responsible for social housing. We are the only province where it was downloaded to the municipalities.

So we have an even bigger problem than we have in other parts of Canada.

Thank you for your dedication. You’ve been a leader in this. You haven’t given up and you’re going to win some day, I can tell you. Because we must respond.

Thank you, Edna.

[DIP TO BLACK LOGO]

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion (July 7, 2010 Mississauga Council)

I believe it is the right of every Canadian to have a roof over their head.

HAZEL MCCALLION QUOTE (on poverty social housing) "I believe it is the right of every Canadian to have a roof over their head."


SENIORS

VISMINOLOW

ROSYPICSUMMARY

SINGLEPARENT

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH


Email from a Mississauga graffiti artist: “youth are fighting with the system because it is CORRUPT there is no way to fix it.”

May 30th, 2010  

Morally beyond redemption. That’s what almost four years of research into Ontario Municipal governance has forced me to conclude.

Morally beyond redemption.

Today I wanted to know how many times I used “morally beyond redemption” and especially when I first coined that phrase. So I GOOGLEd, “morally beyond redemption” together with “MISSISSAUGAWATCH”.

It appears that I may have first reached my “morally beyond redemption” conclusion about a year ago and it first appeared in a comment I wrote to “fthrcast” on YouTube.

I sometimes surprise myself. In this phrase’s debut, not only did I use full capital “MORALLY BEYOND REDEMPTION”, I correctly identified why Ontario municipalities are morally beyond redemption with impunity —”the Ontario government LOOKS THE OTHER FRIKKIN’ WAY”. (What a perceptive first dash out the starting gate for me on that one! “MORALLY BEYOND REDEMPTION” —YouTube says “1 year ago”).

Other appearances include:

“morally beyond redemption. It can’t be fixed”, “Simply unfixable.  Morally-beyond redemption.” Stupid, dull me took to the age of 59 to figure that out. Ontario municipalities, the Province, THE SYSTEM is “morally beyond redemption. It can’t be fixed”.

On Thursday, May 20, 2010, I received an email from a young graffiti artist and we exchanged several messages thereafter. I asked permission to use his first email to me for today’s Blog because I felt what he had to say was too important to be kept just between two people.

One theme here at MISSISSAUGAWATCH is the observation that youth who need a voice the most are also the most-blocked from expressing their voice. That’s the irony and fraud of such initiatives as the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network and Safe City Mississauga —youth don’t have a legitimate say any more than I do.

And Pastor Andrew King simply nailed the reason at Brampton’s November 2008 “Peace to Our Streets” meeting.

On all the panels I sit on? First question’s asked is “Where are the young people? We’re talking about them but they’re not with us.” Young people are very frustrated because there’s a lot of panels. Oh, there’s reports that are written about how much money we’re going to spend! And they’re very frustrated with the system right now.

With that introduction, here are the words of a Mississauga graffiti artist —a youth, called “Anonymous”.  Information that could potentially identify him has been removed. I’ve also cleaned up the few typos he had. We begin.

Hey,

Just checked out your website and appreciate the work you are doing. I really appreciate the graffiti you are documenting being a graffiti artist/writer in Mississauga and would like to share a few words with you.

Graffiti art is not recognized and acknowledged in Mississauga I have been writing since I fell in love with it the first time I ever heard Hip Hop, and hip hop would not be around if it weren’t for Graffiti , I was in Grade 4 when I started scribbling in my notebook my graffiti in the beginning was pretty bad but I never stopped and kept on drawing. I then discovered a whole new world outside of my notebook and black book.

Before moving to Mississauga in Grade 6, in Toronto the streets are filled with tags, throw ups, pieces, burners, murals, even little messages to the police and the government. I didn’t start my graffiti on the streets till just last year, working on my spray techniques and other things, I am only interested in pieces big colorful huge pieces that pop out and attract people’s attention.

Now I do not consider this vandalism as I am an artist simply coloring the streets with a message —a message that can only be seen through graffiti.

…the system is CORRUPT and this is why there is youth violence this is why there are guns on the street and drugs in the hands of children the youth are fighting with the system because it is CORRUPT there is no way to fix it because the people higher up are sitting nice in their big leather chairs, driving their nice cars, living their perfect life when some people in this world have to work hard to get by and even by doing so they get nothing, and after they realize how hard they have to work to get by they break down and no longer want to live life being part of the system because they realize that living life by the rules of the system gets you no where because it is CORRUPT!

Young people today sure are a lot smarter than I was their age!

Notice his “the youth are fighting with the system because it is CORRUPT there is no way to fix it”.  That Truth took me three years of intensive observation/research, a couple thousand in Freedom of Information and 59 years of being alive before I coughed up “ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES ARE MORALLY BEYOND REDEMPTION. (And so is Ontario)” as a YouTube comment.

This video is for the “Anonymous” graffiti artist who’s the subject of this Blog. Just to show him Why he’s right.

To introduce him to (in his words) “the people higher up… sitting nice in their big leather chairs, driving their nice cars, living their perfect life when some people in this world have to work hard to get by and even by doing so they get nothing.”

Politicians’ Game of PRETEND.

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: WARNING! HIGHLY OFFENSIVE MATERIAL (but not as offensive as the politicians) (3:55 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Last, it was exactly one year ago today that I visited the City of Hamilton for the first time to conduct my first graffiti survey there. I’ll be returning today to document my May 30, 2009 Hamilton Graffiti sites and how they look One Year Later.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

GRAFFITI, CITY OF HAMILTON PARK, FIRST DOCUMENTATION (May 30, 2009) and comparative May 30, 2010

GRAFFITI near park. City of Hamilton, May 30, 2009 and again May 30, 2010 (comparative)

GRAFFITI (portion of graffiti wall), CITY OF HAMILTON PARK, FIRST DOCUMENTATION (May 30, 2009) and comparative May 30, 2010

Portion of GRAFFITI WALL near park. City of Hamilton, May 30, 2009 and again May 30, 2010 (comparative)

PEEL YOUTH VIOLENCE PREVENTION NETWORK’s 3rd ANNIVERSARY RAP –with Mississauga graffiti, uh-huh

April 23rd, 2010  

On March 31, 2007 the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network held its inaugural meeting inside Mississauga Council Chambers. I was there and signed up for the Network’s Education and Policy Working Group. After all, Policy is Everything.  If the Policies are poor, or poorly implemented, guaranteed there’s a lot of up and down and precious little forward happening.

One of the best summaries certainly that I’ve ever heard regarding youth violence prevention came from Andrew King, Pastor of the Seventh Day Adventist Church when he was asked why youth don’t come to these youth meetings. He said:

..all I can say is of all the panels I sit on the first question that is asked is ‘Where are the young people? We are talking about them but they’re not with us.’ Young people are very frustrated because there’s a lot of panels Oh the reports that are written about all the money we gotta spend!’ and they’re very frustrated with the system right now. That’s why they don’t come to a lot of these things because the truth is because they don’t believe in what’s happening.

Having observed Safe City Mississauga, the Mississauga Youth Plan and Mississauga’s contribution to the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network, there’s good reason why youth shouldn’t believe in what’s happening. These youth initiatives appear to exist to create the illusion that our public institutions are doing something progressively cutting-edge and worthy of modeling in other municipalities all over Canada.

And politicians like Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito and her gushy “phenomenal”s are heady, hypocritical contributors to the Roots of Youth Violence.

So to acknowledge the third anniversary of the Peel Youth Violence Inauguration meeting, I offer this video featuring Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty, and Brampton Councillor Gael Miles (chair of the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network).

It also highlights Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito (chair of Safe City Mississauga and co-chair of the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network), who is simply “absolutely phenomenal” in her assessment of Reality.

As always, a warning. Much of the graffiti in this video is HIGHLY OFFENSIVE to viewers (but not as offensive as the politicians.)

Video: GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: WARNING! HIGHLY OFFENSIVE MATERIAL (but not as offensive as the politicians) (3:55 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

PREMIER DALTON MCGUINTY “Getting to The Roots of Youth Violence” :

Ontario must and will assume its proper responsibility. I say that as Premier, of course, but I feel it most of all as a parent. Thank you.

CROSS ZOOM

VISUALS MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI
Music:
Caspian & Grafhic – Matrix Shit

Yeah, Cas beyond Grafhic.
Yeah, y’all wanna roll wid us?
Jump in. Let’s go.

Yeah, Cas beyond
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic.
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

This world we live in is a devilish mess
We got homeless people and terrorist threats
So it’s what the homefront
Or the front lines, God help us

We’re confused what to build
Bum shelters or bomb shelters

Cas beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Cas beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top.
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Oh so Matrix Shit, uh

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA and the (delusional) PEEL YOUTH VIOLENCE PREVENTION

BRAMPTON COUNCILLOR GAEL MILES (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

Less than two years later, we have over a hundred individuals involved in working on the youth violence and gang strategy. Absolutely phenomenal.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

Thank you, Mr. Chair.  As Gael said, I think we’re all amazed –those of us on the Committee, at the success and how quickly we’ve been successful over the past two years.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

And she said it is due to the hard work of the staff —we have Dorothy and the other Health Department staff, that have just been absolutely phenomenal.

The organizations’ feedback which we get individually and collectively from the organizations is absolutely phenomenal.

We have some excellent, absolutely phenomenal programs and services that are out there. But by forming this network we have just expanded the impact of every single one of those organizations.

And I am just so proud to have been part of this and it’s just a naturally phenomenal program.

[CROSS ZOOM switch to black and white]

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

And thank you, members of Council, for endorsing the Youth Charter and for endorsing the resolution today that it will be hung in all buildings. And I don’t think there will be one public building in the entire Region of Peel that won’t have this Youth Charter in it after this week.

[CROSS FADE switch to back to colour]

Including, Ron, you still hear? We’re meeting with Ron next week, so it’ll be hanging in the Mississauga News office—

(former) MISSISSAUGA NEWS PUBLISHER, Ron Lenyk (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

For sure.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (endorsement of Peel Youth Charter, October 25, 2007):

—as well.

[CROSS ZOOM]

VISUALS MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI

It’s Grafhic
My lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm locks
The government.
I’m sick of those on top
In the slums there’s always liquor stores and pawn shops.

Cas’ beyond Grafhic
Our lyrical bomb drops
Puts politicians in figure fours and arm…

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

P.S. And guess where else the Peel Youth Charter is hanging?

"PEEL YOUTH CHARTER at City of Mississauga Facilities and Property Management (aka Mississauga Corporate Security) April 16 2010

"MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI (new at site) April 21" "2010 F**** THE SYSTEM" (censored version)

MISSISSAUGA/BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT conclusion: Studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture

April 2nd, 2010  

—As promised —the transcript of this video —uploaded to YouTube just prior to the Hate Crime/graffiti data released by the Peel Police Services Board at their Friday, March 26, 2010 meeting.

Advisory: I research graffiti/tags and do not report any locations no matter how offensive (even racist) it is. After all, if I am documenting such observations as how long something stays up, I can’t be the one reporting it! Having begun my research into graffiti on April 19, 2009, I can now confidently say that studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture. Graffiti and especially the tags, give marginalized/alienated youth a voice they simply don’t have anywhere else.

These youth never showed at Mississauga Youth Plan meetings. Never showed for Peel Youth Violence Prevention meetings.

These youth NEVER show. Because they KNOW.

Like I do.

Want to prep you for the graffiti stuff with a quote from Peel Regional Chair Emil Kolb, February 28, 2008.

“I had a young gentleman in to see me yesterday that was here to convince me that we need to get away from the word, ‘multi-culture’ and we need to get to the word of ‘integration’. If we don’t get to the word of integration —how these communities are going to integrate, that, maybe not in our time here soon, but maybe in his children’s time, they’ll be a big issue in this Region.”

To me, that’s the most important thing Chair Kolb ever said in the four years that I’ve been researching municipal governance.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB, MULTICULTURALISM vs INTEGRATION, YOUTH GANGS, RACISM

OK, enough background.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:09 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (parked directly in front of the City of Mississauga Big Yellow evil empire, March 25, 2010):

March 25th, 2010 and all I care about is that I get this report up on YouTube today and before tomorrow’s Peel Police Services Board meeting.

I read in the Toronto Sun that Peel Regional Police were going to be tabling their annual Hate Crime statistics.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And there was mention that quite a bit of the material that would be presented was in the form of graffiti.

So I’m absolutely intrigued and I want to record my own findings and study so far on graffiti and I thought what better place to do it than right here in front of Big Yellow evil empire City of Mississauga city hall. Because, see right there? Freedom of Information, direct observation, videotape, observing the Mississauga Youth Plan, Peel Youth Violence Prevention —all manner of emails and documents going back and forth, that, right there is a MAJOR Root of Youth Violence.

So I thought no better place than right here with that in the background.

[DIP TO WHITE]

OK, first of all the Mississsauga Youth Plan. I had been observing it including four meetings, ostensibly called “youth input” meetings.

Let’s put it this way. The youth that really needed a voice, not only weren’t represented, they wouldn’t have even been welcome there!

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I realize that the youth who were most at-risk, the ones who got in trouble with police and that I would see at Brampton Court House  —they’re not going to these meetings.

And I thought, well, how do I even go about finding them? And I managed to do that through YouTube. And it became very clear that if you want to know what youth are thinking (laughs) you don’t invite them to the Mississauga library!

The youth that I’m primarily interested in, the target group, the most at-risk, have already pushed these people aside and recognized them for what they are. Frauds.

[DIP TO WHITE]

But how do you gain access to them? To be able to see what it is that they’re thinking and what it is they’re saying because, for the most part, they’re not interested in talking to people like me. I’m 60 years old for example. They just— and a lot of them don’t even trust you or think that you’re legitimately interested in them. And, by the way, I don’t blame them.

And they certainly have a hatred —an absolute hatred, for institutions. And may I also say that I don’t blame them for that either.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So in March 2009, I watched a lot of true youth voice videos on YouTube. And it became obvious that graffiti was a big thing in those kids’ lives. So by April I was already deciding that I was going to start documenting graffiti here in Peel Region.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing I want to say is even though I’m a resident of Mississauga, I think Peel Region. And in fact, the fact that I’m wearing this hat today is symbolic of that. I’m a Peeler. I think in terms —I love the City of Brampton. I love Brampton kids. Those are the kids I taught for most of my career. So there’s this strong feeling of community within me and pride for Peel.

So it wasn’t just a case of me documenting City of Mississauga graffiti, I also wanted to know what was happening in Brampton. And I began my first photographic foray on April 19, 2009.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And I did not report any of the graffiti. While I put these samples up on my Flickr site, I did my best to try to hide the locations. And I can say that even now, that some of these graffiti and tags are still up.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There are some really-truly graffiti artists. And I mean like ART. It’s zero question, it’s ART.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing is, in July and August I also expanded my graffiti research to the Hawaiian Island of Maui. And also expanded my research to include skateboarding culture and to compare —and I also researched skateboarding, to compare the urban-style skateboarding that we have here in Brampton slash Mississauga versus the west coast style of skateboarding that you’d see in California and definitely on Maui.

Very very interesting and I also speculated that there would be a difference in the graffiti between the urban here Mississauga one and west coast, Hawaiian Island kind of graffiti as well.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that I did, is in July and August, what with me researching Hawaiian or Maui-based graffiti, it meant that there was a two-month window that I didn’t have graffiti here in July and August. So what I did just recently, is I filed Freedom of Information with Peel Police requesting their graffiti information for the months of July and August.

And I can’t thank Peel Regional Police enough for two reasons. For one thing the amount of material that they gave back both in terms of print-outs, colour print-outs and also one DVD cost —was roughly $44.00. And they waived the fee. I’m grateful.

But the other thing is, by reading their —Peel Regional Police’s occurrence reports and the quality of their observations and the insights there, that did two things. I learned a lot from what Peel Regional Police is looking for in terms of its own graffiti research. And to realize that they are applying Science to the study of graffiti. As am I, by the way.

[DIP TO WHITE]

One thing that I found with the graffiti here, is I agree too that a lot of the graffiti is —of the Hate ones, and there isn’t as much as you might think. Which in some ways is good.

But yeah, you see the swastikas. You see the White Power. You see N***** and niggaz.

However, I’ve also documented graffiti which shows sort of the Chinese —the target Chinese community, with the Chinese hat and the moustache, with “Chinaman” down there. Or drawings of the turban. And then —I mean really offensive stuff!

The other thing I was looking for was the relationship that these youth who do graffiti have with Police. Because I felt the relationship between youth and Police would be reflected in the graffiti.

And I admit that there’s some “F*** the Police” and “FTP” which is short for “F*** the Police”. And Peel Regional Police, in their July and August 2009 data also showed some evidence of that.

But what was neat was, it’s still quite rare.

And when you go, for example, to the City of Hamilton, which is one of my alternate study sites —comparative sites, “F*** the Police” is one of the most common pieces of graffiti. As is “FTP”. And I’m talking about every pole. Along every area— even in the parks.

And I’m talking about Beasley Park where “F*** the Police” is about this high in big black letters and has been there since I started back in April.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So there’s a really huge difference in the relationship, I believe —at least that’s what I think it suggests between the youth in the City of Hamilton and the Police, as opposed to what we see here in Peel and the relationship with Police.

Sure there’s the odd tag but it isn’t nearly as prevalent and as obvious as City of Hamilton.

And so one of the questions you ask is well, what’s the message there?

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that is interesting is, when I looked at the photographs that Peel Regional Police had for July and August, there was very little overlap between what they documented and what I did.

And the other thing really interesting is, Peel Regional Police —their July/August stuff, a lot of it was parks. And a surprising amount was City of Mississauga sites and parks. And City of Mississauga Corporate Security being the ones filing the reports on graffiti.

[DIP TO WHITE]

That’s not a surprise because I avoid City of Mississauga property because (whispers) I know about these security guards.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I always have a— I have to have a [sic] audio recorder to even feel remotely-safe on City property. So I try to avoid that and my analysis is more along the roadways and just driving along the roads and pulling aside when I see something.

[PART 1 VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Hazel McCallion quote: “What happens if nothing happens?” –Why you document it anyway!

April 1st, 2010  

Tom Urbaniak, author of thebook, Her Worship: Hazel McCallion and the Development of Mississauga (Paperback) sure has some excellent Hazel McCallion quotes.

Today’s Blog is dedicated to just one Hazel McCallion quote —what to my mind, remain the most important words she ever uttered during the time I’ve been researching her.

“What happens if nothing happens?”

"HAZEL MCCALLION  QUOTE "What happens if nothing happens?"

Yes. That’s it. “What happens if nothing happens?” Those five words have defined my research. After all, what does a researcher do when Nothing happens?

Video: Hazel McCallion quotes: “What happens if nothing happens?” –Why you document it anyway! (2:31 min)

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

REPORT FILED INSIDE CAR TOOLING ABOUT MISSISSAUGA  MARCH 30, 2010

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving through Ward 8, March 30, 2010):

So the question is out of all the things that I’ve videotaped Hazel McCallion saying, what is the most important thing?

And the irony, is that what I consider to be the most important thing happened very early on in 2007. And that’s actually a good thing.

Because by because of what she said there, it woke me up in 2007

[DIP TO WHITE]

—I don’t remember what the discussion was about. Could’ve been the “Cities Now”, it could’ve been any number of issues relating to Peel. But at one point, Hazel McCallion offers up comment and then this wonderful —which I still consider the most important thing that was ever uttered by anyone.

And it was simply a question. “What happens if nothing happens?”

“What happens if nothing happens?”

And really, that has been the defining moment and the defining way that I conduct my research. Because I’m forever documenting, “What happens if nothing happens?”

[DIP TO WHITE]

So either nothing happens or the pretense of something happens.

But by gosh, I have documented very few real things happening. So since these people have been elected in November 2006, four years have gone by and I’ve got to say, “What happens if nothing happens?”

Just a lot more of the same.

[CLOCK WIPE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (driving through Ward 7, March 30, 2010):

Between Iannicca and McCallion, their two comments were the focus of my research in that they helped me see how I was going to research and document The Corporation of the City of Mississauga.

Hazel McCallion’s “What happens if nothing happens?”, well you record it anyway! That’s the point about research, is that you can record something happening, but you can also record when you’re researching a MYTHissauga, you’re actually documenting a lot, a lot of nothing happening.

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

Peel Police Services Board “Hate Crime/Graffiti” Report (March 26, 2010) –and how it matches MISSISSAUGAWATCH graffiti (preliminary) findings

March 27th, 2010  

UPDATE: Saturday, March 27, 2010

Just want to provide a quick update on the “Peel Regional Police – 2009 Annual Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report -Memo dated March 11, 2010 that was presented at yesterday’s Peel Police Services Board meeting. First, I need to make this quick because I’d rather work up the actual video of the Hate/Crime Bias presentation. That’s what the next Blog entry will be about.

Just quickly, the observations and comments I made in the two videos I’d posted onto YouTube prior to the Police Services Board meeting turned out to be accurate.

Just last week, I got Freedom of Information results back from Peel Police. I’d requested any data on graffiti incidents for July and August 2009. As I said in my March 25th videos, viewing the Peel Police graffiti samples came as a surprise —that while I did recognize some tags, there was surprisingly little overlap in the graffiti that Peel Police had documented those two months and the kind that I’ve been researching!

I’ve said this before and will repeat it here. What I love about a Peel Police report is the rich DATA. It is PERCENTAGES, GRAPHS, TRENDS. It is ANALYSIS. Bottomline it’s SCIENCE. “SCIENCE.” meaning, that I can replicate Peel Police findings. I should be able to confirm the accuracy/validity of their percentages, graphs and analysis just by walking in their footsteps. This I will do to fill in the gap in my own research —the gap of July/August 2009. So on Monday I will file Freedom of Information on Peel Police’s 2009 Hate/Bias graffiti-material.

Just want to say that several things stuck out in the 2009 Annual Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report. I’ll simply list them because as I said, I’m poised to do a more detailed Blog this weekend.

Something else. Man, it’s a good thing that portions of the report and the graffiti that Peel Police provided through Freedom of Information didn’t jive with what I was seeing. I went back to the July/August incident reports and realized that I’d only received City of Mississauga graffiti and none from Brampton. Of course I know why. I didn’t ask! While the Peel Police report mentions that the 95 Hate/Bias incidents were fairly evenly distributed throughout Peel, I find City of Brampton graffiti “different” from that of City of Mississauga and I’m wondering if Peel Police notice that too. And what it means!

Anyway…

Let me show you Hate/Bias graffiti that I photographed again yesterday right after the Peel Police Services Board meeting. City of Brampton —swastikas, as well as “gay” references at this site.

First photographed December 9, 2009 (above) —and after the Peel Police Services Board meeting (below). Given how many other Hate/Bias graffiti that I’ve photographed/videotaped back in April/May 2009 that were still up there in the Fall 2009, Hate/Bias graffiti is tolerated by Peel residents! After all, the majority goes unreported. I mean what else can you conclude?

CITY OF BRAMPTON SWASTIKAS GRAFFITI (COMPARATIVE first photographed December 9, 2009 and March 26, 2010) GRAFFITI, HATE CRIME, FASCIST SYMBOLS, NAZI

It was a beautiful day and after confirming the continued existence of graffiti at our Brampton study sites, we headed for Toronto and photographed “JESUS LOVES YOU” graffiti.

Clearly a message of Love.

Or is it?….

GRAFFITI TORONTO "JESUS LOVES YOU" photographed March 26, 2010

Next.

Regarding the two graffiti video reports that I posted to YouTube prior to the Peel Police Services Board meeting (below). I know I’d said that I would provide transcripts of both so that we-all can see how closely my preliminary findings matched Peel Police. Sorry. I don’t have that luxury of time. At least not for the next while.

Today I MUST file another video report. Likely two-three hours long, believe it or not. A kind of mega-debriefing session of sorts. And rather than being a “talking-head”, I’m driving around Brampton and Mississauga, the audio is me talking (testifying, actually) while the video portion will document the “habitat” of the “creatures” that I’m studying.

That’s it.

WHAT FOLLOWS IS A REPEAT OF YESTERDAY’S BLOG FYI

Needed to post this prior to tomorrow’s Peel Police Services Board meeting and their Hate Crime/Graffiti Report.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THESE VIDEOS IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:09 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min
NOTE: I caught a break. YouTube records Part 2 uploaded on March 25, 2010 even though it’s 1:24 am March 26, 2010 Mississauga time.

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Also offering Flickr graffiti pics at:

GRAFFITI RESEARCH (Brampton, Hamilton, Mississauga, (and for comparative purposes, Maui, Hawaii)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA STREETSVILLE  GUN DETAIL 090501

“STONEWALLED” SUB-CONTRACTORS FALL VICTIM TO CITY OF MISSISSAUGA FACILITIES AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT’S “DUE DILIGENCE” OF CONTRACTS

February 27th, 2010  

This video has been prepared for the sub-contractors who appeared before the Wednesday, February 24, 2010 Mississauga Council meeting. Unpaid for their work, stonewalled and given the runaround, they too fell victim to City of Mississauga’s Staff’s chronic non-compliance to Corporate policies.

Truth be told, in the case of these sub-contractors, they fell victim to yet another policy believed to be “in place”, just that Mississauga’s Internal Audit did not find any trace of it!

And who was responsible for this contract? Why, none other than City of Mississauga Facilities and Property Management! The same fine folks who honed City of Mississauga Corporate Security into the unaccountable, no oversight, unethical knobs who also profess to be a “dedicated team of security professionals”.

Have to say I felt so sorry for the sub-contractors. In the words of the deputant, “blue collar” workers comprised of “single parents with kids on disability that are being —that are losing a lot of money”.

Sure they’ve been stonewalled, screwed-over and eventually forced to file Freedom of Information to peer at the truth. But in some ways they’re lucky —it’s still just money.

This same City of Mississauga Facilities and Property Management and their Corporate Security Guards arrest people/youth/minors.

By far the most offensive thing in the video I’ve prepared is Councillor Pat Saito looking the deputant in the eyes and saying, “I was assured by Staff at that time that when they did due diligence” and “Mayor McCallion and I did discuss that with Staff yesterday and we have been assured by Staff that they…”

Considering the number of times that I’ve advised Councillors that Staff’s word cannot be trusted, I’m just so offended she’d fling that “I was assured by Staff” turd at these people.

Saito’s “I was assured by Staff”comment alone is Perfect Testimony as to why the City of Mississauga can’t be trusted to hire its own Integrity Commissioner. There’s NONE THERE NOW!

This video is dedicated to the sub-contractors and their families who fell victim to the City of Mississauga Facilities and Property Management’s chronic non-compliance to policy and procedure.

So. As always, the video —followed by the transcript.

Video: HAZEL MCCALLION/MISSISSAUGA COUNCIL DECEIVE SUB-CONTRACTORS AND PUBLIC –WITHHOLD VITAL INFORMATION (10:22 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

Okay, it is Thursday, February the 25th, 2010 and I’m here, underground, near 130 Adelaide Street and I’m to meet with the Judicial Inquiry investigators at 2 o’clock.

You know, I’ve been mentioning the non-compliance of City of Mississauga Staff to numerous policies. And you know, as recently as February 3rd I detailed quite a number of them in a deputation.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (Mississauga General Committee Deputation, February 3, 2010):
* sequence edited for brevity and audio begins after Policies 1 through 6.

Now these are non-compliance.

  1. Video Surveillance Policy (The Corporation’s first SNOOP policy)
  2. Violence and Vandalism Policy (2000 to 2006)
  3. Violence, Vandalism and Bullying Policy (the existing current one)
  4. Corporate Security Code of Conduct
  5. Corporate Security Public Complaints Policy (if you can believe that)
  6. Conflict of Interest Policy
  7. Vendor (and this comes from Audit) Performance Policy (Assumed abandoned, Internal Audit could no trace of it.)
  8. Charging Interest to non-government organization Policy
  9. Infoplace Cash Collection Policy (cost the City over, what? —$700,000 plus)

And then By-laws —the Records Retention By-law. That’s confirmed through Freedom of Information, and even Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

And the City Manager, Janice Baker responded with that she would simply not accept what I had said.

CITY MANAGER, JANICE BAKER (Mississauga General Committee Deputation, February 3, 2010):

The accusations that she’s made about the behaviour of Staff at the City are extremely serious and, you know, I am actually quite taken aback by them.

[dip to white]

But to suggest that there is a callous disregard at —by the Staff at the City of Mississauga for both the responsibilities that we have for the care, custody and control of records, written and electronic, is something that I simply cannot accept. I’m sorry.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

So, what happened at yesterday’s Council meeting was quite remarkable.

It was the 2009 Corporate Awards for Excellence that had been —were being handed out. And you would hear “Leading Canada in management”.

[cross zoom]

CITY MANAGER, JANICE BAKER (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting , February 24, 2010):

Mississauga is continually looked upon as a municipal leader.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

Our excellent Staff, our excellent commitment to the taxpayer.

[cross zoom]

CITY MANAGER, JANICE BAKER (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting , February 24, 2010):

—to address the needs of all sectors and members of our community.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

They are Trust, Quality and Excellence.

[cross zoom]

CITY MANAGER, JANICE BAKER (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting , February 24, 2010):

They have exemplified our values of Trust, Quality and Excellence.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

And Excellence and Excellence and more Excellence.

[cross zoom]

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting , February 24, 2010):

Just outstanding. Solves all problems. Brings Peace and Harmony on all issues that he faces.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

And you know, it’s a killer when I know what Freedom of Information and the Audit Committee has revealed.

[dip to white]

And then, more to the point, there was a group of about six sub-contractors who went before Council* and detailed their frustration with being paid, or in this case, not paid, for work they’d done by [sic] a contractor that was hired by the City of Mississauga.

[cross zoom]

BRIAN MCMAHON, HALTON BMAC MECHANICAL INC (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting February 24, 2010):

Very early in the project, we expressed our concerns to the City Staff that the sub-trades weren’t being paid.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

His frustration that there were people really counting on the money and feeling hardship at this point.

[cross zoom]

BRIAN MCMAHON, HALTON BMAC MECHANICAL INC (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting February 24, 2010):

—to maybe do something, [inaudible] single parents with kids on disability that are being —that are losing a lot of money

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

Things wouldn’t happen —then there was, he used the word “stonewalled” on occasion.

[cross zoom]

BRIAN MCMAHON, HALTON BMAC MECHANICAL INC (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting February 24, 2010):

Through the Freedom of Information Act —because I was being stonewalled by so many people—

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

And then what was really interesting was, he asked, “Did the City do due diligence before hiring the contractor?”

[cross zoom]

BRIAN MCMAHON, HALTON BMAC MECHANICAL INC (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting February 24, 2010):

"Through the Freedom of Information Act —because I was being stonewalled by so many people —through the Freedom of Information Act, I found out the information I do have."

Through the Freedom of Information Act —because I was being stonewalled by so many people —through the Freedom of Information Act, I found out the information I do have. I have access to the contract and to his —to the contract, to the statutory declarations that he was signing.

I also have, I also have his references and his resume, which at the least leaves much to be desired.

[dip to white]

Now there’s projects that he had that he put down as a reference, these are projects that he’s been, basically, kicked off for non-performance —this contractor, he’s done projects where there’s been liens to put on it and he’s been asked to leave.

And these are the —I want to know about due diligence of hiring this contractor and awarding him this job.

The sub-contractor says, "—I want to know about due diligence of hiring this contractor and awarding him this job."

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

And as soon as I heard the “due diligence” I said (laughs) I knew about an Audit Committee just recently, where again, there was issue with contracts. And the Audit Committee had investigated just how contracts were being handled in the City and Hazel McCallion brought up some issues where there had been problems with contractors in the past.

[cross zoom]

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

We sit down with management as we go through the Audit and say exactly what our concerns are so that they have time to address them. And as you can see, by the end of June of this year, five out of seven of the recommendations will be completed.

And also that formal Vendor Evaluation Criteria will be developed by mid-2010.

[cross zoom]

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

But on that point—

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

[inaudible]

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

On that point—

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Yeah.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

There was a procedure set up years ago on Vendor [requisitions? inaudible]. Did you find any trace of it?

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

It’s just an informal vendor performance review right now [inaudible] it’s not being —there’s no formal process in there. The first thing—

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

There was —there was a policy established. Every vendor, and especially on major contracts, that when we had bad experiences —and we have had some bad experiences—

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Yes.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

There was a policy established years ago that the vendor would be categorized. And in fact some would be cut off for future contracts.

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

That’s not—

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Did you find no trace of it?

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

No, it’s not in there.

COUNCILLOR PAT MULLIN (Chair, Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

No, the answer’s no. So I guess [inaudible]

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Well it was set up, I can tell you.

COUNCILLOR CARMEN CORBASSON (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

I remember the discussion.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Do you?

COUNCILLOR CARMEN CORBASSON (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

I remember the discussions.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Some of you who’ve been around long will remember? It was set up. So obviously it got lost in the shuffle somewhere. Cuz we ran, we ran into some bad examples. And that’s when we set the policy. That’s years ago. That’s not —ten years ago, would I be right? At least. So where did that —what happened to it?

Hazel McCallion, "And that’s when we set up the policy. That’s years ago. That’s not —ten years ago, would I be right? At least. So where did that —what happened to it?"

DIRECTOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, SALLY ENG (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

There is some mention of a purchasing By-law where we would be able to —or the purchasing agent has the authority to,  prevents [sic] the bidder from bidding in future contracts. But we have not been able to find any detailed processes relating to what you’re talking about.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Okay.

COUNCILLOR PAT MULLIN (Chair, Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

[inaudble] that we should look into, I guess for the future. Because I remember the discussion.

[inaudible —several speakers at once]

CITY MANAGER, JANICE BAKER (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

That’s what one of the recommendations is.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

I’m getting a little frustrated as Mayor as we set up policies and then they’re not followed. And that’s what bothers me. I was in the business —in the private sector and we had millions of dollars in contracts. And it’s been something I’ve been promoting  —is control of the contracts. And that policy was set up because we ran into one vendor who were [sic] behind two millions dollars, I remember.

Anyway.

So now we’re going to set up one up. Fine.

Someone:

Yeah.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

If we set one up, it better be followed. That is the key. No use setting it up if it’s not going to be followed. You know, I don’t know why there’s such a disregard for policy.

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Just to conclude. Working with Facilities and Property Management, we’ve had a good rapport with them and I just want to thank Ken—

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

The guy that did the renovations at the . I hope he never sees another contract.

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Yeah.

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Am I right?

COUNCILLOR CARMEN CORBASSON (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

And the one at the

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

And the one at the

COUNCILLOR CARMEN CORBASSON (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

That was a bad one.

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

And I’ll be honest with you that’s—

MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

Now that was a bad one.

COUNCILLOR CARMEN CORBASSON (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

I think that’s when it was raised.

SENIOR INTERNAL AUDITOR, AL STEINBACH (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

[inaudible] of this audit, Madam Mayor they, ah,  that contractor again, there was no formal evaluation for those contracts. And that’s why we recommended that that be formalized and documented.

HAZEL MCCALLION (Mississauga Audit Committee, May 11, 2009):

There was even an evaluation form used many years ago because of our bad experience with contractors and we’d see their name pop up again being awarded a contract.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010) :

So, Staff and Council approved a policy that outlined how to go about evaluating a contractor to make sure that the City would be doing this due diligence. And what was interesting is, that was never mentioned to the contractor [sic] sub-contractor who was up there!

[cross zoom]

COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (Mississauga Council Corporate Awards of Excellence Meeting February 24, 2010):

I was assured by Staff at that time that when they did due diligence —and you questioned the due diligence on page 3, which is “I 3c” of the report you filed. You questioned the due diligence of the City.

[dip to white]

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO'S ";And Mayor McCallion and I did discuss that with Staff yesterday and we have been assured by Staff that they went to three of the projects" is an insult of the highest order to both those gentlemen and me!

And Mayor McCallion and I did discuss that with Staff yesterday and we have been assured by Staff that they went to three of the projects —former projects, that this contractor had undertaken —that they’d used as references, and they were similar-sized projects.

And the information that we’ve received from our Facilities Staff, who oversaw the project, is that they received good reviews from two of them. They weren’t able, I guess to get a hold of the third one. But two of them did give good reviews and we have that review.

It doesn’t have a lot of detail in it.

[cross zoom]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (underground somewhere under 130 Adelaide, February 25, 2010):

So instead McCallion and Councillor Saito said, yes, Staff did do due diligence and check [sic] things out.

And again, once I found out that it was Facilities and Properties [sic] Management, again, because I sat in on the Audit Committee, I know that there have been Audits done of that Department that describe their record-keeping as from adequate to non-existent.

February 24, 2010's Mississauga sub-contractor deputants and MISSISSAUGAWATCH have a LOT in common! Both Victims of City of Mississauga Facilities and Properties Management!

And because I research City of Mississauga Corporate Security, also part of Facilities and Properties [sic] Management, there’s a lot of non-existent as well in terms of record-keeping.

So —what’s interesting is, in front of the cameras, there’s this kind of a non-acknowledgment of what happened in the Audit Committee.

[cross fade: logo]

TRANSCRIPT ENDS

Signed,

The (If you like how Mississauga Facilities and Property Management bungles Contracts, you should see the cluster****bungleknobfest that passes for Security!)

P.S. Have I an appropriate sign-off pic? Yep!

CITY OF MISSISSAUGA AUDIT COMMITTEEE JANUARY 24 2000 MINUTES

COMMENT left at the Mississauga News

The Mississauga Muse

Feb 27, 2010 9:07 AM

Really happy this morning…because I finally answered my biggest question

“Does Hazel McCallion know?” Meaning does Hazel McCallion know how Staff operate? Wednesday’s Council meeting CONFIRMS not just that McCallion KNOWS, but that she, like her Staff are Perps. By not telling those sub-contractors on Wednesday, that at the May 11, 2009 Audit Committee she found out that Internal Audit could find no trace of a formal Contractor Evaluation Policy that was passed by Council “10 years ago” she made her Respectful Workplace utterance about “honesty with the citizens both on the Council and on the part of Staff” a lie. First time I ever stepped foot inside Council Chambers (May 5, 2006). Got The Answer to “Does Hazel McCallion know? Wednesday, February 24, 2010. Zero doubt that Mississauga News “knows” too.

2009 MISSISSAUGA VIDEOS: MISSISSAUGAWATCH Shatters the MYTH behind the City of MYTHississauga

January 1st, 2010  

JANUARY 2009 video INSIGHT INTO THE BRANDING (AND FLUFFING) OF MYTHISSAUGA

Last Blog you saw the pics: The first being, Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion hugging and congratulating Michael Nobrega fellow Director of the Enersource Board after their successful Enersource public meeting and Cable 10 broadcast. Nobrega is president and chief executive of Ontario Municipal Employees Retirement System (OMERS) —10% partner with 100% veto power (yes. really!).

Here’s the video uploaded to YouTube on January 25, 2009 of Mississauga Inc and McCallion-Nobrega in action.

Video: GEORGE ORWELL MEETS MISSISSAUGA ENERSOURCE (4:27 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

FEBRUARY 2009 (Uploaded February 10, 2009)

Video of youth/Police interaction on the TTC. Bitter February and the youth was wearing a thin T-shirt —complete with holes.

Video: HOMELESS YOUTH and TORONTO POLICE/SPECIAL CONSTABLES at TTC SUBWAY (Queen St station) 090205 (2:28 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

MARCH 2009 (Uploaded March 12, 2009) FROM THE THIS IS FRIKKIN’ SO-TYPICAL DEPARTMENT

MISSISSAUGAWATCH asks Dr. Alvin Curling if the authors of the Roots of Youth Violence Report had filed any Freedom of Information as part of their research. Nope.

Video: “ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE” co-author, DR. ALVIN CURLING interviewed by MISSISSAUGAWATCH (4:40 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

APRIL 2009 (Uploaded April 17, 2009)

HAZEL MCCALLION SAVES MISSISSAUGA’S SHERIDAN LIBRARY (4:16 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

MAY 2009 (Uploaded May 17, 2009) PUT A *STAR* BESIDE THIS ONE!

Video: HAZEL MCCALLION: on City Staff’s “complete disregard” for Policies (10:06 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

JUNE 2009 (Uploaded June 5, 2009) MISSISSAUGA COUNCIL SETS A NEW RUBBER-STAMP RECORD!

Video: ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE: MISSISSAUGA COUNCIL FAILS YOUTH: IN 12 SECONDS! (1:00 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

JULY 2009 (Uploaded July 4, 2009)

Video: SKATEBOARDING MAUI, PAIA STONEWAVE SKATE PARK (1:48 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

AUGUST 2009 (Uploaded August 5, 2009) NOW HERE’S A PROMISE THAT NEVER DREW ITS FIRST BREATH!

Video: HAZEL MCCALLION MAKES PROMISE ABOUT PUBLIC QUESTION PERIOD (0:54 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

SEPTEMBER 2009 (Uploaded September 10, 2009)

Video: Poor and Invisible in Toronto. Through a (Tim Hortons coffee shop) Window 6:22)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

OCTOBER 2009 (Uploaded October 2, 2009) NOT ONLY WON’T THIS HAPPEN BUT EXPECT RIGOROUS COVER UP

Video: ‘MAKE MISSISSAUGA YOUTH BANS PUBLIC INFORMATION” says COUNCILLOR PAT SAITO (3:07 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

NOVEMBER 2009 (Uploaded November 1, 2009) WHEREIN WE WITNESSED WHO REALLY RUNS MYTHISSAUGA

Video: “Mega-Builder” Harold Shipp $$$threatens$$$ Seven Mississauga Councillors with $$$DEFEAT$$$ (1:04 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

DECEMBER 2009 (Uploaded December 15, 2009)

Video: MISSISSAUGA JUDICIAL INQUIRY: Citizen-Blogger MISSISSAUGAWATCH requests limited standing (8:09 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Follow MISSISSAUGAWATCH on Twitter.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH at www.mississaugawatch.ca

MISSISSAUGAWATCH at MISSISSAUGAWATCH Facebook

MISSISSAUGAWATCH at MISSISSAUGAWATCH YouTube

MISSISSAUGAWATCH photos (and documents secured through Freedom of Information) at Flickr The Mississauga Muse

RELATED LINKS

The Ontario Ombudsman Twitter

OMBUDSMAN OF ONTARIO website

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The Ontario Ombudsman Flickr

CAROLYN PARRISH VIDEO TRANSCRIPT: “This Inquiry is about things that have been going on —murky things that have been going on around our city for quite some time.”

November 8th, 2009  

Yesterday, we posted video of Councillor Carolyn Parrish’s explanation as to why Mississauga needs a Judicial Inquiry.

By way of introduction to today’s Blog, I will simply repeat what I wrote yesterday. The reader can regard this as my official position on the Judicial Inquiry. Yesterday I wrote:

I’ve filed two years and $2,100 worth of Freedom of Information on City of Mississauga Corporate Security. If the rest of the City of Mississauga is as corrupt and unaccountable as their Security operation, this judicial inquiry is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay overdue!

There you have it.

And now, the video, followed by the transcript.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH: JUDICIAL INQUIRY WILL LOOK INTO “MURKY” DEALS AROUND THE CITY (10:04 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT BEGINS:

NOTE:  Councillor Parrish really did say “one hundred million” and the City Solicitor also did say “ten million”. Next, regarding OMERS (Ontario Municipal Employees Retiredment System) Councillor Parrish really did say, “They gave us ten percent of Enersource” —this is clearly in error and can’t be what she meant to say based on the rest of her comments.

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Councillor Parrish.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

Yes, Mr. Chairman, and I know you’re all going to want to boo. So if you just be patient and wait til I finish speaking and then boo maybe we’ll get through this a little more quickly.

First of all I’d like to tell you, and get on the record that there’s a procedural problem here in that the judicial review was passed four weeks ago. So what Councillor Mullin has done is defer the Terms of Reference. She hasn’t asked us to reverse that decision yet. So the procedure to do that is quite different and we’ll have to discuss it.

Secondly I would like to ask the lawyer, the City’s lawyer, if in fact we can get to a 100-million dollars in your wildest dreams and secondly, can a judge order us to pay the costs of the witnesses that come before the judicial review.

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Through the City Solicitor.

CITY SOLICITOR MARY ELLEN BENCH:

In my report, I set out the reasons for why I’ve estimated the costs the way that I have. I don’t think the costs are going to  be anywhere near the range of  10-million dollars. They could definitely go higher than what I’ve estimated because as I’ve said in the report, there are a number of variables depending  on what the investigation turns up and how the Commissioner decides to handle those matters.

In terms of the Third Parties or Corporations or outside parties, the Commissioner does not have jurisdiction to provide funding and I set that out on page 11 of my report. In terms of who has Party status and who can participate fully in the Inquiry, if the Inquiry is held, that is a matter that will be determined by the Commissioner.

The Commissioner establishes the rules for a Judicial Inquiry —Council does not. So they will determine the rules. They will determine the Parties. They make —may make  recommendations on funding if they think it’s appropriate. But they do not have any jurisdiction to make that decision.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

Thank you. And another comment I would like to make is, with the exception of Mr. Shipp who took a direct shot at me, and I will discuss it with you later because I want you  to know what you said about me is not true.

I agree with everything that was  said today about Hazel McCallion. This Inquiry is not about Hazel McCallion. This Inquiry—no—

[Protests, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Let her finish please.

[Protests, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

You’ve had your opportunity.

[Protests, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Order.

[Protests, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Order!

[Protests, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Order. Please proceed.

[Protests, jeers from audience die down]

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

This Inquiry is about things that have been going on —murky things that have been going on around our city for quite some time.

And if you want to talk about money and you want to talk about OMERS, the first thing that was discovered after I was elected, through a very laborious process that cost us over a million dollars, was the Enersource agreement that was signed in 2000 was altered two days before it was signed on direction from the lawyers from OMERS and accepted by then City Manager.

It was altered to give Veto Power —one hundred percent Veto Power to our ten percent partner.

Now you need to understand, that’s OMERS.  They came in. They gave us [sic] ten percent of Enersource and they took one hundred percent control.

They have excuses for doing it but the main excuse was that we have a Put agreement, which is too complex to get in to. If it was a good excuse, why didn’t they bring it to the Councillors of the day in 2000 and say this is why we need this little veto in here. This is why we have to be able to veto one hundred percent of your decisions. You’re ninety percent, we’re ten percent. We have a good reason but you know what? We’re not going to tell you what it is. We’re gonna send a letter from OMERS to the City Manager of the day and to our Lawyer of the day and say, “Just slip that in.”

So that when we were looking into selling Hydro, which we subsequently decided not to, cost us one-hundred-fifty/two-hundred thousand dollars to find that little mistake. And the clock has been ticking ever since.

So OMERS, who sent us a threatening letter last night, saying, “We’ve just spent nine months trying to re-negotiate that deal because we know we shafted you, we’re going to draw the re-negotiation out of the ballpark. We’re taking it back. We don’t like what you’re doing with the Judicial Review. We don’t like being named in it. And by the way, we want you to pay for our lawyers for the last nine months while we were trying to figure out how to fix the mistake that was done without the knowledge of your Councillors or your Mayor!”

The City Manager of the day slipped the papers to her, said go ahead and sign them [inaudible word] the same as the ones Council looked at.

So Number One, I want to look at OMERS, I’m sorry. We’ve have a few deals with those guys.

Secondly, we tried to buy a piece of land to build Sheridan College here in City Centre.  What was discovered was affidavits were sent through the courts where certain persons involved in World Class Development said you have to pay us off. We’ve put in two-point-three-million dollars that we’re not going to get back. So we’re going to take you to court, hold this whole thing up and Sheridan won’t get built because they have to get built by 2011 just like the other infrastructure money.

So if we have to go to court and fight with these guys, W. [sic] World Class Development, Sheridan won’t get built!

So what do we do? World Class Development does all these affidavits, tells us about off-site meetings, tells us this, tells us that. And they say, “But you know what, for a cash settlement from OMERS we’ll withdraw our objection.” In my world, that’s blackmail.

So I want those guys looked at. Because they affect our city and they affect the prices we pay. If OMERS paid them three million to go away, I’m sure we paid them three million more than we should have for that land.

So that’s what I want to look at and that’s what we all wanted to look at.

Mayor McCallion’s Conflict of Interest is a small technicality that is absolutely irrelevant to me.

[Murmurs, groans from audience]

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

What is relevant, what is relevant, is the fact that six days after the minutes of the meeting was [sic] taken care of, somebody in this building changed those minutes. And we’ve never had an explanation.

The other thing you need to know, ‘cuz we’ve asked the City Manager in-camera, you know when you Blackberry each other in business —you guys are all in business, you all have those little Blackberrys, this City monitors our PIN to PIN conversations.

That was admitted by the City Manager that the City has the technology to do that…

[MISSISSAUGAWATCH turns video camera to video surveillance camera over Councillor Parrish’s left shoulder.]

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

So somebody can find out who instructed the minutes to be changed or go into the minutes and change them. To me that’s an issue!

I’m sure you’d like to know that your minutes, when you read them from a meeting are honest, nobody has the ability to change them, and we’ve never had an explanation as to why they were changed.

So when you look at the Terms of Reference of this, it was a lengthy conversation by all the members of Council —and I didn’t give them something in their drinking water, and I didn’t promise them jobs or Heaven, or anything else.

I merely looked into this because I’m a bit of a ferret and I follow Hazel’s instructions which are “Do Your Homework” and when you keep doing your homework and you keep finding problems that you can’t answer or solve —the rest of your colleagues say, “Hey, we got to look at this.”

Now if there’s a way of doing the Terms of Reference that Hazel McCallion’s Conflict of Interest is taken out of it, I have no problem with that because she’s admitted she had a Conflict of Interest.

I want to find out how the minutes got changed, I want to find out why OMERS took what they paid World Class Development to go away. I want to know what other deals have been going on at the City Centre like that. I want to know why we’ve spent a year-and-a-half trying to fix a deal that was signed by the Mayor without her knowledge or Council’s knowledge slipping in a huge Veto Power in there for a little ten percent partner!

My colleague, Nando, has often said, if that is acceptable in business, he’s going to buy ten percent of every one of your houses—

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

(whispers) And tell you what to do.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

—and then tell you what to do with them. When you can live in them. Who can live in them with you. He’s In Charge.

So please get it out of your heads that I— and by the way I was told by Hazel McCallion when she announced six weeks ago or whenever that she was running again, I was the only one who sent her a note congratulating her. I want her to run again!

[Laughter, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

No, I’m sorry…

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Order. Order.

[Laughter, jeers from audience]

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Order.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH:

But I also want this judicial review to clear the air.

And I’m also surprised at how little faith you have in the Mayor when you all keep talking about this thing growing like a giant mushroom cloud.

If it’s a little Conflict of Interest, it’ll be over in ten minutes.

If it’s OMERS it might take longer.

If it’s people in this building snooping on all our PINs and changing minutes—might take a little longer. But these are the things that we want to look at.

[MISSISSAUGAWATCH BATTERY CHANGE —SPECIAL THANKS TO ROGERS CABLE 10 BROADCAST for remaining 17 seconds]

And if there’s a way in the Terms of Reference and I’m going to ask our lawyer, if we can take Hazel McCallion’s Conflict of Interest out of it at that meeting on May 21st, I’d be happy to do so. Could I, through you, ask our lawyer?”

COUNCILLOR NANDO IANNICCA (Acting Mayor):

Through the Solicitor.

—VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS—

Please note that video ends because YouTube allows a maximum of 10 minutes per video and this video is exactly 10:04 including the MISSISSAUGAWATCH logo.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

Videos: Inside Peel Regional Police (11 Division) Young Offenders’ Jail Cells –and Hamilton Graffiti Update

September 14th, 2009  

Well, it was quite the weekend. Went to the Peel Police 11 Division Open House and then paid a return visit to Chinguacousy Skateboard Park. I love Chinguacousy Sk8park.

Today, I conducted a graffiti survey in Hamilton and got one major surprise. I don’t know when but someone went through Hamilton’s downtown core and took major action on the graffiti there. Gosh, most of the graffiti that I’d documented back in June is gone. Erased or totally painted over!

The transformation was so complete that it took me several passes to finally locate exactly where this picture was taken back on May 31st. That door and surroundings were completely free of tags and blight.

THE MISSISSAUGA MUSE POSES BESIDE AN IRONIC ANTI-GRAFFITI POSTER INSIDE A CITY OF HAMILTON BUS SHELTER (PANORAMIC SHOT) 090531

And it wasn’t just one or two streets. Even major graffiti sites behind buildings have been obliterated. It made getting around difficult for me because in all prior visits, I’d used unique graffiti for navigation —not street names! But still, that’s one impressive clean-up effort!

Don’t get me wrong. once you gravitate to the Beasley Park area, and work its cramped side streets, there’s still plenty of “photo-ops”. More about that in later Blogs.

At yesterday’s 11 Division Open House, a Peeler graffiti-specialist was absolutely generous with his time. He taught me how to recognize gang tags. So imagine following a park wooden fenced walkway and you see your normal “F***” this and “F***” that’s and then you recognize the very symbols your Peeler told you about.

GRAFFITI, HAMILTON (September 13, 2009)

Take your pics. Get out fast —but with dignity.

By far, the most interesting thing I did this weekend was spend quality pondering-time in jail. First a brief visit inside a jail cell for female Young Offenders and then about 20 minutes inside the males’ holding cell. (It took me a long time to decipher and document all the graffiti scratched into the glass —plus file a video report.)

So here we are. Two videos today complete with transcripts. The first, Peel Regional Police 11 Division’s tiny female jail cell, followed by video of the males’ cell.

TRANSCRIPT of YouTube video: PEEL REGIONAL POLICE (FEMALE ) YOUNG OFFENDERS JAIL CELL 11 DIViSION

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

This is September the 12th, 2009. I’m here at Peel Regional [Police] 11 Division. Shooting down on the floor to protect people’s privacy. And what I’ve got here is I’ve asked and received permission to videotape. This is where the Under-18’s… I think it’s Under 18.. Excuse me, Officer? What is this again —the Under-what-age?

PEEL POLICE OFFICER

Ah, Young Offenders [inaudible]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Young Offenders 18 and under [Ed. ERROR. Young Offenders are Under-18] and this would be female. And this would be their holding cells so to speak. And this is what they get. And what we’ll do is just go here and kind of step… these look like 6-inch tiles. But 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and then you got the can.

And there’s where you wash your hands. Although I suspect there’s soap there.And this is what you get to sleep on.

So the actual room you have is 1, 2, 3 steps. And I don’t think I have to tell you that…wow.

Let’s see what we got up here. Light bulb. I’ll tell you something. There’s no way I could fit and try to escape from there.

I wonder if they give you a metal cup that you could bang across here.

Video: PEEL REGIONAL POLICE (FEMALE ) YOUNG OFFENDERS JAIL CELL 11 DIViSION 1:40 min

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

TRANSCRIPT of YouTube video: PEEL REGIONAL POLICE YOUNG OFFENDERS JAIL CELL 11 DIVSION (MALE) 090912

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

[Sitting inside the male jail cell with video surveillance camera over right shoulder] It’s not quite what I expected. [looks around]

Uh, I guess, I guess it’s something that I needed to see based on the research that I’ve been doing about City [of Mississauga] Security and how they would call in an arrest. And of course that involves Peel Regional Police.

So you’ve got uh, my concern of course, is that ah, there’s no accountability mechanisms in place for City [of Mississauga] Security and then they’re handed over to Peel Regional Police…

And these are the male cells.

We’ve got a video surveillance camera there [inaudible] We’re gonna go here a bit. A place to take a p*** and a dump. And two beds. So I guess if there’s more than that you got a problem.

And what’s interesting is you get the graffiti and the scratching here. OK. Now I can finally —took me a long time to figure out what this says. This right here. OK, even though there’s a video surveillance camera right there somebody (laughs) managed to scrawl in a complaint in glass that reads, “NO TOILET PAPER”. Finally figured out now.

So there’s a complaint there, etched in glass that there was no toilet paper… is that true?

[camera swings over and around the toilet…] There’s gotta be toilet paper.

[Reaches into a toilet-paper sized hole with no toilet paper in it] I suspect it’s there…

Tell ya, if you want to know the truth in society, there it is. NO TOILET PAPER However, there is a video surveillance camera.

I mean it’s bare.  And it’s, I mean you don’t expect posters up. A jail is supposed to be a place where you have nothing to do but to contemplate how you got in there. And the video surveillance camera… at least you know that the video surveillance camera right here, try pointing to it, yah, right here. Um, that is a Peel Police video surveillance camera and you’ve got Police Services manning that thing instead of Mississauga Corporate Security that have no accountability mechanisms in place.

Trust me. This is what Freedom of Information has confirmed. And that’s what I got a problem with.

Video: PEEL REGIONAL POLICE YOUNG OFFENDERS JAIL CELL 11 DIVISION (MALE ) 090912 3:12 min

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

Signed,

The (Warning to Youth. There’s no INTERNET access in Jail!) Mississauga Muse

Time to lighten things up a bit!

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE DODGE CHARGERS (11 DIVISION) CARTOON September 12, 2009

UPDATE: Monday, September 14, 2009. 9:06 am. The video PEEL REGIONAL POLICE YOUNG OFFENDERS JAIL CELL 11 DIVISION (MALE ) 090912 was replaced because I forgot to dampen the audio of a rather crude word regarding the jail cell’s  toilet arrangements. Also, a viewer hated the original enough to give it a 1 out of 5. He/she may wish to go back and click on the 1 again. Sorry for the inconvenience.

SKATEBOARD SUNDAY preliminary report: Turner skatepark (Hamilton), Chinguacousy skatepark (Brampton) and Iceland skatepark (Mississauga)

September 7th, 2009  

Yesterday as part of a MISSISSAUGAWATCH Skateboard Sunday survey, I visited three major “flagship” municipal skateboard facilities, Turner in Hamilton, Chinguacousy in Brampton, and Iceland, Mississauga. The Sunday before (August 30, 2009) we wrapped up our summer’s observation of Maui’s three skateboard parks.

We’ve already reported on the Maui skateboard scene in previous Blogs and especially in “MISSISSAUGAWATCH reports on three Maui Skateboard parks (StoneWave-Paia, Kalama-Kihei and Keopuolani-Kahalui)”.

Once back in Mississauga, it became clear that it would be absurd to now compare the Maui Three with the skateparks we’d been observing and reporting on back in May and June. For example, while observing Beasley Park in City of Hamilton, we were not aware that the new $500,000 Turner Skatepark had opened. (Plus back in May/June I preferred neighbourhood skate plazas to observing a larger City-wide facility.)

No more. The Maui Three forced me to turn my attention to local Flagship Parks.

Yesterday, as part of back-to-back Skateboard Sundays, I first visited Turner Skatepark in Hamilton. (I’d been tipped to the existence of this new facility by a commenter here.)

I ran a quick check of City of Hamilton Council’s decisions as to how Turner Skatepark got located where it did, and surfed a tour of what Google Maps suggested was an affluent surrounding neighbourhood (it was).

TURNER SKATEPARK CITY OF HAMILTON

By far the most surprising thing about Turner Skatepark came from a conversation with one of several parents sitting around watching their kids skateboarding. This mother enthused about how the skatepark was right next to the police station (and I mean right-next-right-next).

I responded that such close presence of police must make parents feel comfortable letting their kids skate there.

Her response was, “Oh no, I’d never leave him here by himself!”

That made Turner Skatepark the most fascinating park in our 6-facility study.

After Turner, I traced out the Upper James route that a kid living around Beasley Skatepark would have to take to reach the flagship Turner. There were only three kids skateboarding that day at Beasley and only one had an actual skateboard. A pervert waxed poetic into my video camera about the number and quality of his testicles while three other suspicious characters were sitting on a park bench watching me videotape graffiti.

Now with two months of Maui skatepark observation behind me, I see Beasley Skatepark for what it is. One ramp. One small depression for a “bowl” and some concrete to smear a board across —that’s Beasley.

BEASLEY SKATEBOARD PARK (CITY OF HAMILTON) 090906

Two small girls were on swings unsupervised and I was reminded of the Turner Park mother’s comment, “Oh no, I’d never leave him here by himself!”… Hamilton: A Tale of Two Cities.

I then set off for Chinguacousy Park, City of Brampton. I heard more F-words in my observation time there than at all Maui skateboard parks the months of July and August combined, plus Turner that morning. Not a good start…

However, Chinguacousy surprised me the most of the three local skateparks I visited yesterday. And surprised me in a good way.

CHINGUACOUSY SKATEBOARD PARK (CITY OF BRAMPTON) panoramic shot 090906

(Click here for larger version)

Chinguacousy reminded me of Kahalui’s Keopuolani Skatepark.  More about all this in later Blog entries.

It was getting deep into afternoon and I reluctantly headed for Iceland in Mississauga. I say “reluctantly” because 1: I have the City of Mississauga Corporate Security database printout of all the bans and arrests issued at that City Property, plus 2: I’d visited the skatepark there on several other occasions.

ICELAND SKATEPARK (CITY OF MISSISSAUGA) 090906

On this visit, there were perhaps 20 boys, with about an even split of bikes and boarders. Being just fresh from Chinguacousy, I found Iceland the bore. I videotaped a bit, narrating into the camera and then once I was done, a parent supervising his two kids talked me up.

“You mentioned a skatepark in Brampton?”

“Yeah, Chinguacousy. I just came from there.”

I mentioned Chinguacousy’s attributes (like that it was in a park and not beside the 403) and then provided directions. He gathered his two kids and B-lined it for B-Town.

I saw Chinguacousy as a cool mix between Maui’s Keopuolani and Kalama skateboard parks.

CHINGUACOUSY SKATEBOARD PARK (CITY OF BRAMPTON) TRUE TO THE SPORT 090906

Even a Chinguacousy conversation between a kid and a BMXer reminded me of the New York Times article “The End of Falling” in memory of Skateboard pioneer, Andy Kessler.

The BMXer rested his bike on a ramp ledge.

CHINGUACOUSY SKATEBOARD PARK (CITY OF BRAMPTON) close-up BMX BIKE 090906

The kid asked, “How did you get so good?”

“I fall down a lot,” and he sped away.

Having observed all six skateparks now, I’m confident in rating them as if I were a Middle School kid committed to skateboarding. But I recognize that what this almost-60 year old white female might look for isn’t the same thing as a real skateboarder (or for that matter a male!).

For me, the Skatepark Rankings were based on architecture, respect and supervision. Did the parks have the kind of ramps and bowls to attract the serious big-boy skaters? Was there a culture of respect among the park users?  If two parks’ architecture and respect rated equal then the ranking came down to a skatepark’s supervision.

I hope you’ll agree that a skatepark where kids are respectful of others and is unsupervised, is infinitely preferable to a supervised park. Unsupervised means it’s the kids’ skatepark where they are free to be respectful, inclusive and solve inevitable conflicts —on their own.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

New York Times and Toronto Star REMEMBRANCE: Skateboarding pioneer, Andy Kessler (48) dies of wasp sting

August 23rd, 2009  

I had meant to post this a week ago. Andy Kessler…

The thing  is that for readers to understand the importance of skateboarding pioneer Andy Kessler, you have to know something about the skateboarding culture. Far too many of us see skateboarders as thugs-on-wheels.

And when we see graffiti and tags, we make an immediate connection to skateboarders.

I can tell you this from my summer research here on Maiui. Real skateboarders have the same contempt for the “thugs-on-wheels” as real graffiti artists have for taggers.

Real skateboarders are athletes and like top tier surfers, they’re Alpha-Male-fearless-crazy. (Expect skateboarding to become an Olympic sport.)

While I began my study of skateboarders and skateboard parks in Mississauga —and then Hamilton, it took quality time at Maui, Hawaii’s three skateboard parks for me to GET it. Get real skateboarding.

I didn’t know who Andy Kessler was until I read his Obituary in the Toronto Star. He was a skateboarding pioneer, died at age 48 from a wasp sting.  I can’t emphasize enough that to understand real skateboarding, you have to know that the first skateboarders were surfers.

Thought I’d share a portion of this Blog commemorating Kessler —“The End of Falling”, from the New York Times first.

What’s interesting is Bret Anthony Johnston’s comparison between the East Coast skateboarders and the West Coast ones (“gritty, dirty, and beautiful, the shadow-version of the breezy West Coast surf-style”).

That’s the same difference that I’ve observed this summer between the Mississauga/Hamilton skaters vs those at the three skateboard parks in Maui, Hawaii.

Excerpt from the New York Times Blog, “Happy Days, The Pursuit of What Matters in Troubled Times”

Image Courtesy of the New York Times

Andy Kessler, West 30th Street, Manhattan, 2005. Image courtesty of the New York Times

Andy Kessler, West 30th Street, Manhattan, 2005.  Ivory Serra

The End of Falling

August 13, 2009, 11:15 pm

By Bret Anthony Johnston

I’ve been skateboarding seriously for more than 20 years, and while I never met Andy Kessler, I know his life story. Most skaters over the age of 25 do. Born in Greece and raised on West 71st Street in Manhattan, Kessler started skateboarding when he was 11. This was in the 1970s, a time when skateboarding was so alien to New York City that he had to mail-order his gear from California. Significance-wise, think: Prometheus and fire. When other kids saw Kessler carving around the Upper West Side on his board — which would’ve been three inches wide with metal wheels — they followed, and just like that, the East Coast skate scene was born. It was gritty, dirty, and beautiful, the shadow-version of the breezy West Coast surf-style.

And now, with special thanks to the Toronto Star.

COURTESY THE TORONTO STAR:

REMEMBRANCE

TheStar.com | Obituary |

Andy Kessler, 48: Skateboarding pioneer

Aug 15, 2009 04:30 AM

DANIEL DALE
STAFF REPORTER

The next time some punk skateboarder cuts you off on a downtown sidewalk, curse Andy Kessler.

California’s skateboarding pioneers were surfers, kids who rode in empty backyard swimming pools when they couldn’t ride the waves.

YOUNG SK8RZ, STONEWAVE SKATEBOARD PARK, PAIA, MAUI, HAWAII

Because there were fewer pools in New York, young rebels there were forced to pioneer city skating. In the late 1970s, a group of a few dozen teenagers turned the features of the urban landscape – stairs, poles, flower planters – into obstacles to be challenged and conquered.

“It was about making that action happen with your imagination,” J.J. Veronis, one of those rebels, told The East Hampton Star. “And Andy was king.”

Kessler, born in Greece in 1961 and raised in New York, was the unofficial leader of the Soul Artists of Zoo York, the city’s first skateboard crew. The Upper West Side was their laboratory – and their fishbowl. When they began skating, they had to order their gear by mail from California; in large part because of their rolling advertisements for the sport, New York developed its own burgeoning scene.

Kessler received his first skateboard from his mother at age 10. Like most Zoo Yorkers, he dabbled in graffiti and drugs as a teenager. After the crew disbanded in the 1980s, he became an addict. But he recovered. He then helped take skateboarding off city streets.

Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii August 16, 2009 0043

Despite his dedication to street skateboarding, Kessler long advocated the creation of a haven where New York’s skaters could ride unbothered. In the mid-1990s, his lobbying persuaded the municipal government to build its first public skate park. The city hired him as lead designer, and he eked out a living creating several more.

Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii August 16, 2009 0027

Kessler continued skating into his 40s. While young skaters tended to be unaware of his contribution, an ignorance that sometimes bothered him, the older ones never forgot. In 2005, dozens helped raise thousands of dollars for his medical care when he broke his femur in a wipeout.

Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii August 16, 2009 0044

Though he could be unpleasant – “Some days you caught him and he was a jerk, some days you’d sit and talk for hours,” skate-park builder Tim Vander told ESPN – he was widely beloved.

Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii August 16, 2009 0037

Kessler died Tuesday of a heart attack following an allergic reaction to a wasp sting at a cottage on Long Island.

He was 48.

This pic is dedicated to Andy Kessler. I’m sure he’d know what the kid on his back and under his skateboard is doing. But up until my husband and I witnessed it, we wouldn’t have been able to guess.

Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii August 16, 2009 0043

Signed,

The (Special mahalo nui loa to the skaters at Keopuolani Skate Park, Kahului. Maui, Hawaii) Mississauga Muse

“Often, especially when Kessler was nurturing what would become the East Coast scene, the kids who gravitated toward skateboarding were misfits and malcontents, the shy outcasts who’d been intimidated and sullied by the complex pressures of social interaction. Skateboarding gave them an identity and voice, and Kessler, by example, gave them the confidence to declare themselves to society.”

“This is who he was and how he’ll be remembered, as a man who understood the abiding and cathartic power of resilience. You don’t give in. You take every run —on the ramp, with recovery, at City Hall.”

Bret Anthony Johnston from “The End of Falling” New York Times Blog, “Happy Days, The Pursuit of What Matters in Troubled Times”

READ THE TORONTO STAR ONLINE

www.thestar.com

READ THE NEW YORK TIMES ONLINE AT:

www.global.nytimes.com

Video: features Mississauga Council’s announcement of the St. Joseph Secondary School lockdown and –After the Storm

June 18th, 2009  

I’m thoroughly spent. Bare bones blog today.

Just going to rely on a Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words (and presumably a YouTube video is worth a Million).

So. Here’s video of yesterday’s Mississauga Council announcement (delivered by Councillor Carolyn Parrish) of the St. Joseph Secondary School stabbing incident and lockdown. The rest of the video shows the calm after the storm. Anyone expecting video of police arriving with sirens blaring and lights flashing followed by ambulances will be disappointed.

I stayed for the entire General Committee meeting and so showed up at the school well after our Peelers had restored calm.

I’ll also re-run video of the October 30, 2008 Peel Regional Council announcement of the lockdown at Lincoln Alexander Secondary as well.

Followed by video of me asking Roots of Youth Violence co-author, Dr. Alvin Curling whether the Roots of Youth Violence authors had researched their report using Freedom of Information (Answer: No).

For the record.

LOCKDOWN LIFTED: St. Joseph Secondary School calm restored (features City Council’s announcement)  3:27 min

UPDATE: June 18, 2009. The original video was replaced for the sake of brevity (seems some people didn’t like the extra 90 seconds worth of police cruisers).

(Please click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

MALTON HIGH SCHOOL LOCKDOWN: MESSAGE TO PEEL POLITICIANS 4:36 min

(Please click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

“ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE” co-author, DR. ALVIN CURLING interviewed by MISSISSAUGAWATCH (4:40 min)

(Please click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

That’s it.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

UNACCOUNTABLE ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A major Root of Youth Violence

Bob Dechert and Hazel McCallion field question, “ACCOUNTABILITY? WHERE?” at Safe City Mississauga town hall meeting

June 14th, 2009  

[UPDATE: June 15, 2009. I’ve just been advised of an error in yesterday’s Blog. I’d used “Progressive Conservative” instead of “Conservative” when referring to Mississauga-Erindale MP Bob Dechert. This means I’ll have to rework the video which made reference to “P.C.” and post the corrected version. So please be patient as I make this fix. Thanks also to the reader who pointed out that I spelled “ostensibly” as “bstensibly”. Apologies especially  to Mr. Dechert for referring to his party as “Progressive”. Now only yesterday’s Blog.]

On  June 11, 2009, the former Mississauga Crime Prevention Assocation, aka Safe City Mississauga, hosted a town hall meeting at Ruth Thompson Middle School to assure the assembled that “The federal government has been working tirelessly in the fight against violent crime”.

Canadian Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada Rob Nicholson was there as special guest and believe me, there was a lot of toughness going on.

According to the Mississauga News article “Tories tough on crime, residents told”, about 60 people turned out to hear Nicholson outline “his government’s commitment to cracking down on crime.”

I was one of those 60 people and I blew my chance to ask the Justice Minister my question which was basically, “Where do you get off getting tough on youth when you don’t get tough on provincial and municipal governments ostensively there to serve them?” But alas… it was not meant to be.

However, I did get to ask a similar question that both Mississauga-Erindale MP Bob Dechert (Conservative) and Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion responded to but predictably didn’t answer as in answer-answer.

Here is the video of that exchange, followed by the  transcript.

Bob Dechert and Hazel McCallion field question, “ACCOUNTABILITY? WHERE?” (3:35 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

TRANSCRIPT.

Brad Butt (Chair: Safe City Mississauga):

Okay, we’ll go to our final question. Ursula, you got a question over here to end us up?

The Mississauga Muse (Witness: MISSISSAUGAWATCH):

Yeah, just regarding Youth programs, I’m just wondering when funding and money is given to various Youth programs (and it really doesn’t matter whether it’s Peel or anywhere else, I’m talking about any municipality specifically in Ontario). I’m interested, what kinds of Accountability mechanisms are in place to ensure that there’s effectiveness in the program.

I know that Peel Regional Police had a summit back in 1994 –94 I think it was. And their first recommendation was to ensure that there was Accountability in place for various programs, for cost-effectiveness and everywhere else.

It still isn’t happening!

And I’m just wondering if there’s going to be any kind of effort on the part of the Federal government to kind of make the Provincial government more accountable, who then might turn the screws on the municipal government? Thank you.

Bob Dechert (Mississauga-Erindale MP (Conservative):

Thanks for the question, Ursula. I think the question as to —how do we monitor the programs, the Federal programs at the Federal level for things like at-risk Youth programs to make sure that they’re effective.

The Federal government doesn’t hold the Provincial government accountable or audit their functions but I know that they

The Mississauga Muse (Witness: MISSISSAUGAWATCH):

I know  i—

Bob Dechert (Mississauga-Erindale MP (Conservative):

But we certainly do and Julius can tell you that the programs that his centre operates, there is a separate function of the Department of Safety and Security and other departments that fund the programs at his centre and on an annual basis. They measure effectiveness of the program that his centre and all these centres are delivering to ensure that they are reaching their goals.

Their goals set [sic] for them when they apply for funding and then there is an audit department of that ministry that at the end of the year audits to see if they’ve met their goals. And if they don’t meet their goals they don’t get continued funding for the next year. And they’re told, you know, what they need to do to improve to meet their goals and objectives.

I’m pretty sure that the same thing happens at the Provincial level and I’m sure (turns to Hazel McCallion) Mayor, the same thing happens at the municipal level as well.

(To Mayor McCallion) I don’t know if you want to say something about that provided it’s short.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion:

At the local level, our Staff [inaudible] applications for grants very thoroughly. It has to meet certain criteria.  And especially they have to have audited statements of their finances. And if they don’t meet, as you say, Bob, they don’t meet the criteria that we set down, then the next year they don’t get the grant. Simple as that.

It’s a very detailed analysis that’s done on every application. It’s done by the Staff and you know, they don’t monitor the program all year round but when they come back to the application the next year, then they got to show proof how they spent the money. Was it spent the way —the purpose for which it was granted? And we ask for audited statements.

TRANSCRIPT ENDS.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

MISSISSAUGAWATCH and a www.connect2endviolence.ca billboard (Britannia Rd, Mississauga)

“TAGGIN’ A LIFE” –MISSISSAUGAWATCH “BLUE MUSE” EXPLORES GRAFFITI (WARNING! COARSE LANGUAGE ADVISORY!)

May 29th, 2009  

This is a new MISSISSAUGAWATCH feature called  “BLUE MUSE”

Today’s Blog is certain to offend.

It contains photos of Mississauga-based graffiti that are also certain to offend. The pics were selected to offend. The  (BLUE) Mississauga Muse even scribbled a poem (blank verse) laced with the F-word —expressly to offend!

This Blog is dedicated to fellow “scrotes” (aka worthless scumbags) and is called “TAGGIN A LIFE” You’ve been sufficiently warned.

(If you’re still interested in accessing today’s “BLUE MUSE” Blog, just click on the blue box with the + sign.

WARNING! Offensive content, click to view

TAGGIN A LIFE

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA (COOKSVILLE GO STATION) 090527

Fuck’n had it —FUCK the LIES.

I’m a fuck’n open wound!

As fuck’n bullshit as LIES are,

Their PRETEND is fuck’n worse.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA LAKEVIEW DETAIL 090521

Pretend to fuck’n listen.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL during PUBLIC WORKS DAY 090523

Pretend to fuck’n understand.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA COOKSVILLE WOLFEDALE 090523

Even pretend to fuck’n care.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA (COOKSVILLE GO STATION) 090527

They can’t fuck’n fool me!

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA (COOKSVILLE GO STATION) 090527

HIGH TIL I DIE!

Make my

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA COOKSVILLE BRIDGE 090527

NOISE

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA COOKSVILLE HANSON 090527

NOISE!

MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI (area: MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL) 090416

NOISE!

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA POLICE RELATED 090524

FUCK 50!

PEEL POLICE and YOUTH MISSISSAUGA COOKSVILLE HURONTARIO BRIDGE 090527

I need it fuck’n REAL!

Signed,

SCROTE

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI PROPHECY COOKSVILLE HANSON 090527

“The revolution will not be televised”…  At least let’s hope not on (*SNORK*) ROGERS CABLE 10…

This concludes the MISSISSAUGAWATCH feature,“BLUE MUSE”

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: MAJOR ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

MISSISSAUGA GRAFFITI RESEARCH leads to “VIRTUAL GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA” (for All of Us “losers” with Nothing Better to do who need to “Get a Life”)

April 20th, 2009  

Just tons happening right here in MYTHissauga.

What I’d only observed and duly documented was confirmed last week. Anyone who is serious about trying to understand Youth isn’t going to get the goods from your government —whether that’s your local crime prevention association or the latest “youth study” funded by your provincial politicos.

Since March 2007, I’ve witnessed for myself that what Youth say to “intermediaries” is not relayed to elected officials or to the Public. At each step in the communication channel, a Youth’s message is filtered, modified, manicured and as I’ve personally experienced, BLOCKED altogether.

What’s left? Primary research. Watching videos that Mississauga/Peel Youth have produced and posted to YouTube. Reading Youth comments to other Youth —no matter how racist or repulsive. Following up on some of those comments.  Getting f**** ***s back and emailing them back again. Persevering, and sometimes being rewarded by a Youth who actually opens up.

Yesterday, I followed up on a Youth’s tip through YouTube and toured Brampton and Mississauga in search of graffiti. I can tell you this. The kid was right.

Just a reminder. Defniition of graffiti from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary.

graffiti

 

3 entries found. 1graffiti (transitive verb) 2graffiti (noun) graffito

 

 

 

 

Main Entry: 2graffiti Function: noun Etymology: Italian, plural of graffito Date: 1945

 

 

 

: usu. unauthorized writing or drawing on a public surface

The functional word here is “unauthorized”.

Didn’t take long to find some.

I knew I was on the right track right off the start. I’d settled into the back of Westwood Mall, set up my camera and tripod to compose a shot of “HELLRAZORS” when three kids (Grade 3 age) approached on bikes.

“You photographing graffiti?”

“Yeah,” I smiled.

Big grin back and— “COOL!”

and that was it.

Needless to say, there’s graffiti that I can’t share —no matter how artistically the F-word is sprayed to a surface.  I offer the results of yesterday’s foray presented by order the photos were taken.

GRAFFITI WALL BRAMPTON DOWNTOWN April 19, 2009

GRAFFITI BRAMPTON DOWNTOWN April 19, 2009

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA HURONTARIO EGLINTON April 19, 2009

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA HURONTARIO EGLINTON BRIDGE April 19, 2009

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA HURONTARIO EGLINTON BRIDGE April 19, 2009

Being a bit of an artist myself, I’d sure love to have my say on a highly-visible slab of concrete but I’m not even capable of littering, let alone “unauthorized writing or drawing on a public surface“.

So I’ve decided to try VIRTUAL GRAFFITI! And sooooooooooooo….

VIRTUAL GRAFFIT MISSISSAUGA: MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL

And because, I have a lot of time on my hands and nothing better to do and haven’t got a life…

VIRTUAL GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA: MISSISSAUGA CITY SECURITY KNOBUNIT

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

Hazel McCallion saves Sheridan Library: “…please, spread the news that this library is NOT closing!”

April 17th, 2009  

Hey Missy Dudes and Dudettes,

Apologies for not having a fresh Blog since April 14th but there’s just been so much to document/research that there’s simply been no time to report on what’s happening.

To give you an idea of what MISSISSAUGAWATCH has been up to in the data collection department since Monday’s Blog here’s a list.

Data collection, researching through Freedom of Information and bearing witness to what needs to be witnessed are far more important than regular Blogging.

You’d think that would go without saying. But no.

The Internet is thoroughly polluted with Blogs spouting opinion —the situation made worse by comments to opinion-focussed Blogs spouting opinion from readers spouting their opinions.   Far too many Blogs assault readers with hundreds of words before actual supporting documents/data are presented.

The very worst Blogs are 100% opinion.

I can tell you this —consider it a reader alert. As of this week, one more Blog (already toxic with unsubstantiated opinion) has joined our virtual world.

As for MISSISSAUGAWATCH.CA,  all I can say is Freedom of Information research continues…

Next. Today’s Blog.

SHERIDAN LIBRARY PUBLIC MEETING April 15, 2009

I’ve been observing Mississauga Council since June 2006 and I can’t tell you the number of times Budget deliberations have threatened the Sheridan Library. Cut hours. Cut hours. Cut hours.

Cut hours so much that here’s what Sheridan Library service looks like today (from the mississauga.ca website). Hint: When you scan the hours, think of when kids are in school and parents at work.

NEW! Hours – Winter 2009

Mon 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tues 3 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Wed 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thurs 3 p.m. – 9 p.m.
Fri 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sun CLOSED

There’s a worrisome trend at the City of Mississauga that I’ve already mentioned in previous Blogs. Two years worth of Freedom of Information documents reveal that City of Mississauga Staff aren’t strong on social issues.

Cut-and-pasting from a previous Blog that dealt with cuts to hours of library service, Councilor Saito said it best.

PAT SAITO: They are probably the four libraries that are in the area of most need.”

“I guess when I look at the, the hours, or sorry, the libraries that are suggested to be closed for the saving on the Friday evenings and the Sundays.. You know (small chuckle) they’re the four libraries —four of them, Meadowvale, Burnhamthorpe, Malton and South Common. They are probably the four libraries that are in the area of most need.” —Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito (October 15, 2008 Budget Meeting)

Now speaking of areas with most need, we have Sheridan Library. And I have to say I found the presentation by the Mississauga consultant fascinating. For one thing, she used 2004 data. For those who need the Obvious spelled out for them 2004 was five years ago!

The other odd item was the difference of opinion about the needs of the community in the immediate area. The City of Mississauga consultant downplayed the need —that there were other parts of Mississauga more “at-risk”. Then the E.S.L. (English as a Second Language) teacher for the nearby Oakridge Public School, who attended to support his kids, provided data showing that the Peel District School Board identified his school —Oakridge, as Number One in terms of  need.

Two studies. Two very different findings. Something is very wrong here.

I suppose that this is as good a place as any to tell readers that in my former life, I taught at Oakridge Public School back in the mid 70’s. Many youngsters were needy back then!

A lot of people attended this meeting to defend the Sheridan Library. But I have to congratulate that Oakridge E.S.L. teacher because he served up data. Facts.

As a result of the information he provided, he’s made it possible for me to file Freedom of Information on various aspects of the Sheridan Library. (I won’t reveal more because I know the minions of evil empire move their lips to this Blog.)

Enough.

Here’s the bottomline.

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion  has the following message.

“Please, spread the news that this library is NOT closing. “

And I’m only too happy to.

HEY EVERYBODY! SHERIDAN LIBRARY IS NOT CLOSING!

And not only that but just from examining the Mayor’s face during her speech and afterwards, it’s a pretty good guess that she’s going to see that this needy community’s largely new immigrants (and the Oakridge kids) get a library reflective of those needs.

Ward Councillor Katie Mahoney has defended Sheridan Library every single time it was threatened. Afterwards, I even stood in line to speak with her and thank her for the resolute defence she played on behalf of these people. Mahoney squawked every single time. And her last Council squawk made it clear to Mississauga Staff not to bring up the topic of closing again.

Still, a Councillor has surprising little power.

What has guaranteed a brighter future for Sheridan Library is McCallion herself.  I’m convinced that the Mississauga Mayor did not know the embarrassing conditions at Sheridan Library. Frankly I had my eyes opened too Wednesday evening as well.

The cramped conditions and aging books sure turned the mississauga.ca News Release,  “Service Options Review for the Sheridan Community” into an Orwellian joke.

Down at the very bottom of the City’s News Release. it states:

Mississauga is Canada’s sixth largest city with a population of more than 700,000. With well-established infrastructure and state of the art facilities, the City is considered to be an employer of choice, delivering quality municipal programs and services to its citizens. Mississauga is a dynamic, diverse, and progressive municipality, known for its economic strength and for being Canada’s safest city.

“state of the art facilities”?! STICK IT YOU SPINMEISTERS IN COMMUNICATIONS!

Well, I certainly feel better now…

So here is video of Mayor McCallion’s wonderful address to the Sheridan Library Community Wednesday evening.  And the transcript of the video. All for the record.

HAZEL MCCALLION SAVES MISSISSAUGA’S SHERIDAN LIBRARY 090315  (4:16 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

TRANSCRIPT  Mayor Hazel McCallion Sheridan Library April 15, 2009 public meeting:

Thank you very much and I came to listen. And there are some excellent suggestions put forward.

And I want you to know that your Councillor has protected this library.

And I want you to know that myself and the Councillor and even Councillor Mullin, is concerned about reducing the library hours.

Because I really believe the library, in many years, is the community centre as much as it is, especially for the students.

And you know, today, in order for Canada to be competitive, it is so important that our children get every opportunity to learn more because that’s the only way will remain competitive.

[Apologies, battery change]

The services, by the way, Paul, [Ed: Commissioner of Community Services, Paul Mitcham] that we provide in this library obviously is not adequate. I hate to hear that there’s not enough computers. Today, the children, when they’re doing their research, the computer is such a key to it.

So I heard two things tonight –how the library is stocked. Is it that same as others libraries in the area? I don’t mean all libraries. We DO have the Central Library. And we DO have a district library. And we have a [inaudible] library and therefore they should be all equal, whether the neighbourhood is here or in Streetsville or Erin Mills or wherever it is.

So we heard tonight, there is a need. As I say, your Councillor has protected the library. There was a movement to close it and she stood up and made sure it wasn’t closed.

Now we’re here tonight and Councillor Mullin has joined us.

The library, you know, years ago, when there weren’t community centres and there weren’t arenas and there weren’t all those things, there were libraries. Think about that. There were libraries because that was the key to a community.

And so the library is an extremely important facility in the community.

In regard, I agree with Councillor Mahoney as well, that the library should be located in the right location and that is important as well –to be able to be available to as many people as possible.

Not all –we can’t have a library on every corner –we can’t have a library right next to your house, I wish we could, but we can’t. So we have to choose a good location. And I think your Councillor is well aware of where the library should be.

We will attempt –I will try to negotiate with the owner of this plaza as well. And I would think that the economic downturn and the fact that plazas are not doing as well –and this one, I understand is not doing as well as others and I think that there’s a pretty good negotiating opportunity.

Secondly, we will look at land within this area that Councillor has clearly defined to see if there is. It’s tough to purchase land these days, you know. You can’t force people to sell it to you but we will make every effort.

I know that Paul, our Commissioner here tonight, will bring me up to date on the negotiations that are taking place with the owner of this plaza and I will get involved.

So tonight you gave us some ideas –I think they’re great– I want you to know that we are here to serve you and to serve this community as we try– [McCallion cut off by applause]

So thank you for coming and please, spread the news that this library is NOT closing!

[TRANSCIPT ENDS]

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

HAZEL MCCALLION: READ "TRANSCRIPT Mayor Hazel McCallion Sheridan Library April 15, 2009 public meeting: ...and please, spread the news that this library is NOT closing"

Addtional resources.

I was unaware that the young man sitting in the chair to my right was Peter, the person who left an announcement about the Sheridan Library meeting in “About the Mississaugas Muse”.  I Googled him and found his excellent summary of the Sheridan Library meeting.

Peter Browne describes himself as a “Peter Browne student. nerd. politics activist” and I encourage you to read his “Sheridan Branch Library Meeting” summary. Clearly Peter is a Blogger committed to informing his readers. He’s actually posted an audiotape of the  meeting as an mp3!  Audio and video cut through the He Saids and She Saids of differing opinions of what actually happened.

Also please visit Peter’s Flickr site for his photographs of the information slides presented at that meeting.

Last. Here is the Mississauga News article, “Neighbourhood needs its library, residents say”.

MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL: KEEPING VIDEO RECORDS OF CITIZENS BUT NOT OF THEMSELVES?

April 11th, 2009  

Hey Missy Dudes and Dudettes,

Today’s Blog is going to be a little different because it will consist entirely of a report I filed inside Mississauga Council Chambers last Wednesday as Council went “in-camera”.

It’s essentially my incredulous and frustrated response to  the chronic blight of citizens being limited to MINUTES of Council meetings. Being limited to reading the accounts of all the He-Saids, She-Saids They-Saids of municipal government meetings through manicured MINUTES.

MINUTES —someone writing stuff down, just like it was done back when papyrus was first invented!

So, crabby, I vented into my video camera my own “Why aren’t we recording all meetings on VIDEO? Or at least AUDIO?” report.

Today’s Blog will be the transcript.

Video: MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL:  KEEPING VIDEO RECORDS OF CITIZENS BUT NOT OF THEMSELVES? (8:17 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

TRANSCRIPT BEGINS

I have to say that Council today was really remarkable in the amount of “He-Said She-Said They-Said” that was going on. And they were talking about going back to minutes of meetings.

Well, I mean, I happen to know when you compare the video of the Council and even General Committee meetings –the video that I shoot, and you compare it to what actually makes it in the minutes, we’re talking about Creative Writing here. And that’s a problem that is systemic here at the City of Mississauga.

And what they write down is essentially [a] manicured message of The Corporation and that’s pretty well anybody who’s required to write a report of some kind.

And what was particularly fascinating was reference to what happened at various in-camera meetings. Now in-camera meetings are closed, secret meetings –really, away from the public. In fact the word, “in-camera” means exactly the opposite.

They go off into a special room up there. I guess it’s on the third floor and then away from the public. We don’t know what they’re talking about in there. And there seems to be, no not “seems to be” –certainly, there was considerable debate as to what it is that they actually said in behind closed doors.

And it’s left me to wonder, surely the in-camera meetings aren’t limited to somebody taking notes [whispering into camera] because City of Mississauga is not good at taking notes. You don’t want them to take notes on you.” [whispering ends]

[Pauses to think…]

We’re in the new millennium. 2009 now. And we’re witnessing an entity –indeed, pretty well all municipalities -that they limit the minutes of their meetings to what someone chooses to write down and record.

And just from my own experience and research and two years of Freedom of Information documents –to be able to tell the difference between what they [City of Mississauga] say publicly and what The Reality shows, you know, they do privately…

‘scuse me, telephone.

[cell phone call interrupts. Fade to black. Fade in]

Where was I? Right. We’re in a new millennium where the kind of camera that I’m using right now to record this has seven hours of recording time. [reaches for digital recorder] We have digital audio recorders that can record for days!

And yet we’re limiting things to minutes of meetings –in other words, Pen and Quill Technology, and the public is limited to what someone chooses to record.

And in my own experience, and this is researching and securing documents through Freedom of Information, it’s often what they don’t record that screws you over royally.

And I’m just wondering when the debate between, “well this was said and that was said and this was left out and no, no, no you don’t have all the facts” -what I don’t understand is why they can’t have [points] on that computer screen, because I can do it at home -go to my hard drive, I can go right now and find out what the March 11th meeting said about Enersource or about some corporate policy or what by-law was passed or what wasn’t –and I can’t understand -why we’re limited to someone’s view of what happened!

That’s why I’m recording this! Because I know the inventive Creative Writing that goes on here. Because the selective “memory” [gestures] within these walls is obscene!

[whispers] It’s obscene!

And I uh, just two weeks ago, I secured Freedom of Information on Report Writing for Mississauga Corporate Security and it was a pdf file [Ed: incorrect, I meant “Power Point” files] and there were three documents. And while it didn’t say directly that you should keep stuff out, it did warn the guards that anybody could secure or ask for their records –and by the way, I do.

And they also mention “Freedom of Information” as being one.

So they don’t want to write down something that doesn’t advance the interests of The Corporation.

And you know, you’ve got Parrish and Adams saying one thing. You’ve got Mahoney saying something else and you know [reaches for digital audio recorder] let’s hear it in here! Or better yet, on video.

And I really think, one of the things is, forty or fifty years from now –because I think our democracy is being eroded something horrible, just.

We’re allowing our governments to use technology unfettered and that includes [points to Council Pelco PTZ “Pelco One”] these frikkin’ video surveillance cameras without any oversight!

And they’re using this sophisticated technology and yet citizens forty/fifty years from now, when they’re going to want to know how Mississauga came about. How it responded to the Smart Growth. How it got the transit system it developed. That’s happening right here, right now! This is The History.

And we’re allowing –citizens are allowing the history of this city to be [points to Council] to be written by them!  And, and, it isn’t just that, it’s all Ontarians are allowing that to happen. Whether it’s in Vaughan, in Whitby, in Ajax, in Brampton, in Oakville. All citizens in Ontario –and I’m going to use the word “victimized” -are being victimized by minutes of meetings as opposed to it being recorded and the actual video record of every Council meeting, of every General (Committee) meeting, of every Audit Committee meeting should be part of the record!

And I know why it isn’t. I know why it isn’t. Because a video record cuts through the “He-Said, She-Said”. Cuts through the selective reporting -or even the lies. Because.. [long pause]

I, uh –the thing that happened today with Councillor Parrish and her frustra-I can understand the frustration! I can understand what it’s like to be stonewalled, to have delays, to be treated with disrespect –and by the way, being bullied, intimidated, threatened and [very long pause] I can understand her frustration.

[even longer pause]

They’re coming back (from in-camera). So let me record it this way.

Let’s add “no video records of things” and “selective minutes, selective reporting” as another Root of Youth Violence.

TRANSCRIPT ENDS

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

Councillor Carolyn Parrish slams City’s $731,485.00 “goof up” that “flew through” Mississauga Council with ZERO discussion.

April 2nd, 2009  

Just thought I’d share video of yesterday’s $731,485.00 General Committee meeting.

Long story short, regarding Mississauga’s transit revenue loss of $731,485.00 , I was advised (thanks to the tipster) that the Ottawa Citizen first broke the story of Infoplace Ticket Centre woes on January 27, 2009 but didn’t name Mississauga as a creditor.

Money woes shut lottery kiosks

Five area booths affected; company owes $9.7M

By Tony Lofaro, The Ottawa Citizen January 27, 2009

OTTAWA — Five lottery kiosks in Ottawa and others across the country closed on the weekend, and threw close to 800 people out of work.

The kiosks, owned by Infoplace Ticket Centres Ltd. and located in Carlingwood Mall, Billings Bridge Plaza, Place d’Orléans, Lincoln Fields and Hazeldean Mall and 180 other locations across Canada, shut down Friday night. The kiosks sold lottery tickets, bus passes and postage stamps and were franchise operations with five or six employees at each location.

“We disabled the terminals so that lottery business could no longer be conducted, given their situation. We had no alternative,” Don Pister, a spokesman for the Ontario Lottery Corp., said Monday.

He said the Infoplace Ticket Centres Ltd. represented “less than one per cent” of retailers that sold lottery tickets across the province. In Ontario, more than 10,000 outlets sell tickets on behalf of the lottery corporation, he said.

“It’s too soon to say what happened, but the company ran out of money,” said Hassan Jaffer, a trustee with Grant Thornton Ltd. Trustees in Toronto. He said the Toronto-based company owes 40 creditors about $9.7 million…

By February 11, 2009, The Ottawa Citizen listed Mississauga out by $600,000.

Bankrupt ticket firm owes city $1.9M

Ottawa officials to attend upcoming court hearing in hopes of getting money back

By Jake Rupert, The Ottawa Citizen February 11, 2009

The city’s 2009 financial outlook has taken a potential $1.9-million hit with the bankruptcy of a kiosk company that used to sell bus tickets and passes, and one councillor is angry the municipality was doing business in a manner that left it exposed to that high of a loss.

Infoplace Ticket Centres Ltd. had five kiosks in Ottawa shopping malls. The company largely sold lottery tickets and bus passes and tickets near major transit stations. It filed for bankruptcy at the end of January.

According to the trustee appointed to oversee the bankruptcy process, the company owes $9.7 million and the City of Ottawa is its largest unsecured creditor. Infoplace Ticket Centres operated 180 kiosks across Canada.

The list of creditors includes several other municipalities including:

Yet it took the Toronto Star (and Mississauga News) until March 25, 2009 to pick up the story. Why?

Mississauga mayor calls for audit after city fails to collect $731,000 owed by bus ticket firm

Mar 25, 2009 04:30 AM

Comments on this story (4)

Phinjo Gombu URBAN AFFAIRS REPORTER

Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCallion has ordered a city-wide audit of money owed to the municipality after she learned her city could be out $731,485 in transit ticket revenues with the collapse of a kiosk chain.

Why did it take two months after the story appeared in the Ottawa Citizen for it to break in Toronto/Mississauga?

And it seems that I’m not the only one asking for details.

The $731,485 revenue-loss appeared as Item 29 on yesterday’s General Committee “additional” agenda.

Zero discussion, just “flew through” and it was moved for receipt in 19 seconds then neatly swept behind the secrecy of closed doors.

However Council did talk for over ten minutes on whether to spend $15,000 to remove a wall that was ordered built by just one councillor who wanted a wall where one originally wasn’t (you’re getting all this down, right?). I managed to videotape eight minutes of wall-discussion but there was actually more that didn’t get documented (perilously low battery).

To Councillor Carolyn Parrish’s credit, she’d finally had enough. Here is the transcript.

Councillor Carolyn Parrish:

I find it fascinating that we’re spending this much time on it [talking about $15,000 on a wall] and the report where we lost $750,000 on bankrupting [inaudible because I said, “Exactly” into the camera] just flew through. And I’m going to tell you the reason it flew through without my asking the questions that I want to ask is that I think it involves personnel.And I want to know why —and it’s coming up again in-camera, and I want to know why it took four months for us to be informed and I want to know who goofed up when it says in the policy, “Cash or cheque on delivery arrangements for tickets”. But I don’t want the audience or the people watching on television to think we spend all our time on a $15,000 wall and we’re ignoring the $750,000 mess up on tickets that we’ll never get back plus the other amounts —the outstanding tickets that we won’t get back.”

Then they went behind closed doors (called “in-camera”) came back to make their announcements. All except for Parrish. Her seat was empty (the lady’s not good with pretending)…

Called out the Item then —nothing. “Flew through” again and adjourned.

Here is video.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH SLAMS $731,485 COUNCIL “FLEW THROUGH”

(1:37 min: 8 minutes of which was compressed into 5 seconds)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

Ask yourself why Mississauga Council  “flew through” Item 29 without a word, whisked it behind closed doors ( in-camera) and then “flew through” again once out from behind closed doors.

Control the Message.

If Rick Mercer is reading this, that’s how you “stay in power for 31 years.”

And that’s why citizens need The Province to grant  the Ontario Ombudsman  full investigative powers into municipalities as well as the rest of the MUSH sector.

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

UPDATE: THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2009 11:30 pm Special thank you to the YouTuber who emailed me and requested that I cut down the wall-discussion even further. So now the 8-minute wall-discussion is compressed down to 5 seconds. And I’ve replaced the original vid. Thanks again to the viewer for the comment. You made the video much better.

Mississauga Muse at April 1, 2009 General Committee meeting (splitting headache in need of caffeine)

“But I don’t want the audience or the people watching on television to think we spend all our time on a $15,000 wall and we’re ignoring the $750,000 mess up on tickets that we’ll never get back plus the other amounts —the outstanding tickets that we won’t get back.”

MISSISSAUGAWATCH to “ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE” co-author DR. ALVIN CURLING… “Municipalities are a MAJOR Root of Youth Violence”

March 12th, 2009  

Hey Missy Dudes and Dudettes,

Dr. Alvin Curling, co-author of "Roots of Youth Violence" March 10 ,2009

MISSISSAUGAWATCH VIDEO INTERVIEW with Dr. Alvin Curling, co-author of The Roots of Youth Violence.

TRANSCRIPT BEGINS…

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: I have some questions regarding “The Roots of Youth Violence”

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Yes.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: —and  one of the questions I have is: When your team worked on “The Roots of Youth Violence” from the initial drafting to the final product, did you do any research using Freedom of Information —and specifically, filing Freedom of Information into Schools, Municipalities and even Police?

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Well most of the research that we have done, which we contracted Scott Beaudry (sp?), a renowned criminologist, to do that. We gathered all the documents that were public already.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Yeah.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: About Freedom of Information, I don’t think [inaudible} most of it unnecessary —they were all public documents out there. We just pulled all that together and then presented it.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: OK, the next question. Are you aware that the 2001 Municipal Act doesn’t require Ontario municipalities to have a public complaints process in place?

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Don’t have to have a what?

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: They don’t —The 2001 Municipal Act doesn’t require municipalities to have a public complaints system in place.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Well, a—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: —which means that there’s no framework for accountability within municipalities.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: The municipalities do have accountabality, of course. But I presume that in their own way they do. But I’m not quite familiar with what it hasn’t got and what it has—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Well, for example, The City of Mississauga, in the 30 years, never had a public complaints system, let alone a formal one.

Video shifts to the MAY 21, 2008 MISSISSAUGA COUNCIL MEETING..

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR PAT MULLIN: But I guess that I’m looking for some direction from possibly Staff if there is something that we could put in place which would be, I guess, a complaint procedure against Staff. And maybe somebody could respond. Or if there’s another way in terms of looking at it.

MISSISSAUGA MAYOR HAZEL MCCALLION: Councillor Mullin, I met with the City Manager this morning. I’ve not seen the report. And I was going to ask  —and I was a little slow in asking, that this report be referred back. To look at the process.

Video returns to March 10, 2009 interview with DR. ALVIN CURLING.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: And I’ve been filing Freedom of Information for two years on Peel, Brampton, and so on and I can’t find a framework for accountability. And just one more thing? I just want to show you..

This is a 1994 document by Peel Regional Police and it made a recommendation regarding Crime Prevention that said, “Delegates recommend that crime prevention initiatives be unique and tailored to local communities.”

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Yes.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: That’s 1994. Then it says, “It is recognized that the two existing Crime Prevention Associations are the best vehicle for program development and implementation.” And we can agree with that too.

Then it says, “A process of accountability and evaluation should be built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness.” I haven’t found any.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Is that right?

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: No. So, this is really the question that I have. Do you support, or what are your feelings towards allowing The Ontario Ombudsman full investigative powers into the MUSH sector —Municipalities, Universities, Schools and Hospitals?

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Well, actually, I can’t comment on that really because the fact that you say to give The Ombudsman full investigative authority to investigate a municipality…

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Right now he doesn’t have that. You know that, right?

DR. ALVIN CURLING: No because he —actually The Ombudsman is The Province, not The Municipality. [inaudible] to the Parliament itself not to the mayor. So that—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Oh I know, but I mean… That’s why I’m saying. A municpality that doesn’t want to held accountable?.. you can’t make it accountable. And that’s what I believe to be a major Root of Youth Violence.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Well… well that’s a view. That’s your view.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Well, actually, I’ve got Freedom of Information that shows that municpalities here —they don’t know what each other are doing. They don’t even know share the information with police.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Well, we talked about sharing that. And lots of that. We talked about each municipality, each community, could share some of their experiences because one municipality is different than the other. You can’t use the solution of one community to solve the other’s problem. So they have their own unique way.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Well basically, what I see happening is that they are trumpeting their successes, sometimes inventing their successes and the authentic accountability —and I suspect that’s why you don’t see Youth here?… Because they don’t think this is real.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Is that right? Well they have to come out even if they don’t think it’s real and come and say it, you know…

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: Yeah.

DR. ALVIN CURLING: Thanks very much.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH: OK. Thank you, sir.

VIDEO INTERVIEW ENDS and here’s the video…

“ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE” co-author, DR. ALVIN CURLING interviewed by MISSISSAUGAWATCH (4:40 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

Last, Dr. Alvin Curling will be speaking this evening at the Jamaican Canadian Association from 6:30 to 9:30 pm. 995 Arrow Road (Arrow & Finch)

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: MAJOR ROOTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

McMurtry/Curling, Volume 1 FINDINGS, ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS -word-surfing for “municipal”, “municipality” and “municipalities”

December 29th, 2008  

Hey Missy Dudes and Dudettes,

Just repeating the intro that I wrote in my two previous Blogs…

I’ve been an observer of Mississauga municipal governance of over two years, researching various aspects of its conduct and operations through direct observation (thoroughly documented with audio and videotape) as well as through Freedom of Information.

The Mississauga Muse videotapes Mississauga Council

It’s been well over a month since The Province released the McMurtry/Curling Review of the Report on the Roots of Youth Violence I’ve written five Blog entries on that report.  Click on any one of these links:

In my last Blog I provided a searchable summary —a Readers Digest/Coles Notes version of all instances of the word “accountable” and “accountability” in the 468 page McMurtry/Curling primary document, Volume 1 FINDINGS, ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS.

In today’s Blog, I took the 468 page document and did a word search for “munici”.

“munici” would help me find all instances of the words “municipal”, “municipality” and “municipalities”. Why? Because MISSISSAUGAWATCH believes that Ontario municipalities and their lack of ethical infrastructure are themselves a major Root of Youth Violence.

There can be no better example of municipal failure to legitimately address Youth Violence than this comment from Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito as she trumpets the “amazing” success of the Peel Youth Charter and the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Strategy.  Apparentlly, their progress is so “amazing” that it prompted this former City of MIssissauga employee of Public Affairs, to fling out the word “phenomenal” four times:

“Thank you, Mr. Chair.  As Gael said, I think we’re all amazed –those of us on the Committee, at the success and how quickly we’ve been successful over the past two years…”

–Mississauga Councillor Pat Saito  PEEL REGIONAL COUNCIL (October 25, 2007)

Watch Councillor Saito in action and it’ll help you understand why the McMurtry/Curling “Roots of Youth Violence” report (and at-risk Youth) are doomed.  It’ll also go a long way in understanding why I’ve taken McMurtry/Curling’s “Roots of Youth Violence” and word-searched for “accountab-” and now, “municipal-“

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube and Google Video)

To reiterate, I have knifed through the McMurtry/Curling Volume 1 FINDINGS, ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS word-searching for “municipal”, “municipality” and “municipalities” and also included the sentence before and after to provide context. (We did not search for “local” as in “local government” and acknowledge this work as incomplete.)

Like the previous Blog, this “municipal”, “municipality” and “municipalities” entry is also a work in progress, and will over time include links to other Youth-related reports, articles, images and even YouTube videos.

So we begin:

MISSISSAUGAWATCH Highlights: The report of the Review of the Roots of Youth Violence

(Word Search “munici“) Volume 1 FINDINGS, ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSIONS

 

WORD SEARCH: “municipal” “municipality” and “municipalities” in RED.


Violence involving youth is a challenge for many Ontario municipalities and rural areas.  To help ensure a provincewide lens on available youth programs and services, we asked ministries most impacted by violence involving youth for an inventory of relevant programs and services they deliver or fund.    p. 13

We obtained exceptionally valuable information on areas of particular interest, including addressing social exclusion, crime prevention and poverty reduction through place-based policy and service delivery strategies; the structural governance initiatives necessary for success in these areas; data collection, particularly in the area of race; targeting and monitoring mechanisms; community engagement; and the United Kingdom’s wide-ranging anti-racism strategy. Our work with the City of Toronto and the United Way led to their representatives asking to join us on this visit, and we were very pleased to have the perspectives of a major funder and a municipal government at our meetings.    p. 14

In the case of the first two items, the Province must move quickly to put in place the necessary governance structures. In the case of the other recommendations, and subject to discussions with municipal governments and community groups, we believe that substantial progress could be achieved within six months.

And yet, municipal and provincial planning and design processes are not traditionally inclusive of youth, and especially not of youth who are racialized minorities.    p. 51

Carter, G. (1979). Report to the Civic Authorities of Metropolitan Toronto and Its Citizens. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto.    p. 108

Pitman, W. (1977). Now Is Not Too Late. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto.    p. 110

Prosecution recommended that the Nova Scotia Police Commission, municipal police departments and police commission boards develop innovative outreach programs and liaison roles to provide visible minorities with more positive police interaction (Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr. Prosecution, 1989a).    p. 117

The Race Relations and Policing Task Force and many other reports recommended creating a community and police advisory group on racism training to reflect the community perceptions of policing (e.g., Rolf, 1991). Stephen Lewis (Lewis, S., 1992) and Clare Lewis (Lewis, C., 1992) both recommended establishing a community-based monitoring and audit board to work with police forces and municipalities, in conjunction with the Race Relations and Policing Branch of the Ministry of the Solicitor General, to conduct a systematic audit of police race relations policies.    p. 119

The typical approach of provincial and federal governments remains to identify a provincial or national priority, develop a program and a service delivery model, and then either provide the service or contract out its provision in accordance with standards set by the government. While there is some experience with regional approaches, and some evidence of support for the place-based initiatives of municipal governments, the paradigm remains centrally driven universality.    p. 142

This involves looking in each neighbourhood to determine what is working already, and to find and support local sources of strength. Those sources may be municipalities, individuals, organizations, programs or institutions. What is important is that the operating orientation not be to simply focus on naming problems, but rather on finding, supporting and building on strengths.    p. 145

To advance the strategy overall, the government also created Local Strategic Partnerships with the local authorities (municipalities), community agencies and residents. These partnerships (discussed in more detail in Chapter 9) connected local funding priorities with national polices by identifying urban neighbourhoods in need of assistance, helping them form a plan and arranging necessary service agreements with other organizations.    p. 149

Before we outline Prof. Ellis’s approach in more detail, we should first indicate how we would see it being used to identify priority neighbourhoods. We would regard the rankings determined by the index as the basis to start a conversation with each affected municipality to determine areas requiring priority attention. We believe that the factors and approach used by Prof. Ellis will usefully identify areas for careful consideration, but that the Province must work with the affected municipalities to ensure that local, on-the-ground knowledge is taken into account to verify that the identified areas are indeed the most disadvantaged ones locally.    p. 155

We note, for example, that Toronto has been able to develop a more comprehensive approach to identifying priority neighbourhoods, using more indicators and looking at the local availability of services. These and any similar initiatives elsewhere should be respected by the Province, and the lessons learned from them should also be included in conversations with other municipalities. In particular, every consideration should be given to adopting Toronto’s approach of using a local mapping exercise to assess the practical availability of core public services in determining that an area warrants priority attention.    p. 155

Similarly, municipalities should have the lead in determining the boundaries of any such areas. The units of analysis proposed by Prof. Ellis are small, which permits them to be either used individually or combined into approximations of actual neighbourhoods.    p. 155

The immediate value, though, remains that the index will provide the Province and its municipal partners with an objective way to identify the areas of the province that should be considered as priority areas for a place-based approach.    p. 157

The Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services oversees policing in Ontario. However, costs concerning youth-related programs, including those of the Ontario Provincial Police and municipal police, are not aggregated at the provincial level. We do know, however, that according to the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, the total cost of policing in Ontario in 2006 was $3.4 billion.    p. 207

The OPP helped develop content for CyberCops in Ontario and, in partnership with the Ontario Physical and Health Education Association, delivered training to teachers on its use. The Ontario government provided financial support for development of CyberCops and distribution across the province to schools, OPP detachments and municipal police services.    p. 210

Healthy Babies, Healthy Children

Babies and mothers are screened to detect problems that could limit a child’s abilities later in life, allowing early interventions. The program is delivered through public health units, and the cost is shared with municipalities. Other early years initiatives include programs involving preschool speech and language, infant hearing, blindness/low vision early intervention and infant development.    p. 212

In addition to public investments in public housing, steps must be taken to improve the living conditions in private rental accommodation. We did not receive much information on the best ways to do this, but can say that the provincial interest in addressing the roots of violence involving youth may well require increased public interventions in the form of low-cost loans or other ways to ensure the necessary investments are made. Federal programs for this remain in place, but they fall short of the mark. The Province should seriously consider cooperating with municipal governments to close the gap as part of its strategy to address the roots of violence involving youth. We cannot wait to resolve theoretical turf wars among governments while the quality of the actual turf on which people live is generating violence.    p. 237

Second, the ministry needs to find ways to prevent a period of incarceration becoming a “gang-entry” program. We were advised that many youth, while in custody, develop relationships with gang members that lead to gang affiliation. They then take that association with them when they return home. In some instances where youth are incarcerated with youth from other cities, this transition jumps municipal lines and brings a new and more dangerous gang culture to areas that did not have that problem before. The ministry needs to be sensitive to this issue and should implement a strategy to prevent it from occurring.    p. 288

Our belief that the Province should fund the social infrastructure we propose for disadvantaged communities does not absolve the other orders of government of their responsibilities for services. There is an obvious need for the federal government to recognize the impact of its own cutbacks and to begin to invest seriously in the health of disadvantaged communities. The Province should continue to be vocal in this regard and to press for enhanced federal funding. The Province should also take every opportunity to nurture and build on the workmunicipal governments are doing in these neighbourhoods.    p. 301

Ontario has made some moves in the direction of using schools as delivery points for services. More than 300 Ontario Early Years Centres are located in schools. So too are many of the province’s Best Start hubs, which integrate public health, education, children’s aid, programs for children from 0 to 6, and municipal and other services. Parenting and Family Literacy Centres are also located in schools.    p. 308

The leasing body would have two key characteristics: facilities management expertise, and knowledge of community and other programming. Municipalities might want to use or establish agencies to do this, or organizations like the Y might well be interested. No doubt there are other service organizations with the skills and interest that should have this opportunity.    p. 309

In summary, we see the Province’s role in this area being to support these efforts by making clear in tangible ways that they are valued, by providing structural and financial supports, by being active participants in resident engagement work already underway in municipalities and by demonstrating a continuing commitment to work in partnership as these efforts build community capacity. We emphasize the word “support” because, if communities are to be strong for the long haul and the tough issues, it is the individuals within them who must have the will, and invest the substantial time and commitment required, to function in more cohesive ways.    p. 313

We speak largely about a provincial obligation in this regard because of the need for a provincewide approach to community building and because of the clear provincial interest in the outcomes to be obtained. Nonetheless, it is clear to us that this community development work needs to be done in close collaboration with the municipalities, which have an essential and central role at the local level. This is especially true in places like Thunder Bay and Toronto and others where this kind of foundational work is already.    p. 313

A Role for Colleges and Universities

Outside the governmental sphere and in addition to the valuable related work that many funding bodies and municipalities are undertaking, there is another very important but largely untapped public resource, which can be brought to bear on this issue. We refer in this regard to the resources and talents within our colleges and universities, many of which are located near the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods, and all of which we know to be interested in building and supporting their local communities.    p. 314

There are many opportunities to help community groups or agencies conduct evaluations, service mapping and needs assessments, reviews of relevant best practices and other small-scale research projects. And, on a larger scale, the community and the post-secondary sector can also work together, often with the local municipality, which knows well the longer-term research needs, to identify and carry out research agendas and projects to support long-term social investments. One leading example of this is the collective role a number of postsecondary institutions in British Columbia played with their communities in developing the evidentiary case for the early childhood learning initiative discussed in Pillars 1 and 2.    p. 315

Second, the provincial government must work with the other orders of government to create both the structures and the relationships that permit the coordination of the relevant activities across governments. We appreciate that this may be a challenge with the federal government, but there are no external impediments to the Province’s building a new governance relationship with the municipalities on these issues. As that is done, we believe that success will encourage the federal government to accept its significant and serious responsibilities in this area.    p. 327

Third, the Province must begin to work with municipalities, and if possible the federal government, to bring communities into the governance framework in meaningful ways.    p. 327

Towards New Relationships With Governments and Communities

In this section, we move to a discussion of the other two governance elements we consider essential to advance progress on the roots agenda. The first is the creation of both the structures and the relationships that permit the coordination of the relevant activities of the three orders of government, with an initial emphasis on work with the municipalities. The second is working with municipal governments to bring communities into the governance framework in meaningful ways as a core part of building new governance relationships.    p. 344

In our view, notwithstanding the many advantages of collaboration, the Province must move vigorously to accomplish everything it can do on its own if collaboration cannot reasonably be obtained. In doing so, the Province should of course always value and seek cooperation with other governments, and even in its absence act in a way that respects the existing leadership and knowledge that reside there, especially at the municipal level. It should also always act in a way that builds community partnerships wherever possible and that leaves space for and encourages other governments to come to the table.    p. 345

A Municipal Focus

We accordingly believe that, while the Province should pursue federal cooperation in the course of its ongoing business, the priority for seeking intergovernmental collaboration within the proposed governance framework should be with the municipalities. For reasons we will go on to discuss, we also believe that the major focus and locus for building that collaboration should be in the disadvantaged neighbourhoods discussed in Chapter 7.    p. 345

We will accordingly focus most of our analysis on building collaborative structures with municipalities in the disadvantaged neighbourhoods.    p. 345

Building Collaboration With Municipalities and Communities in Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods

i) Rationale and Approach

Collaboration with the regional governments and municipalities is paramount. This is due to the highly local nature of what has to be done, the knowledge municipalities have about their communities and what works on the ground, and the leadership many have already demonstrated on issues related to the roots of violence involving youth. The challenge is how to create and sustain that collaboration on matters central to addressing the roots agenda. Getting caught up in, or undercutting, the work to restructure the provincial-municipal relationship more broadly, or embarking on yet another complex and time-consuming process of structural negotiations with the large number of highly diverse municipal governments in Ontario must be avoided.    p. 346

In the result, our advice is to combine the second and third aspects of our governance model by focusing on working with municipalities in and for the identified priority neighbourhoods. In this approach, the neighbourhood becomes the place where the provincial-municipal relationship on roots issues is built, not the place it is rolled out after having been negotiated somewhere else. In this approach, residents and local service providers are inside the governance model at the outset and integral to how it is built and operated. This approach will make sure that results flow early, with any structural agreements to anchor the local work made as needed, being tailored to local reality and forged from practical experience. Agreements, where required, would follow experience rather than preceding it.    p. 346

This approach builds on the discussion in Chapter 7 and earlier in this chapter about the importance and value of focusing program and policy initiatives in the most disadvantaged neighborhoods in the province. Chapter 7 also outlined a methodology to identify those neighbourhoods in conjunction with the municipalities. Among the many benefits of this approach are that it allows the Province (and other partners as well) to increase the return on investments by putting resources where they are most needed and by drawing on local knowledge and strengths. To these, we would add that it creates a natural forum for collaboration.    p. 346

The City of Toronto, using a more comprehensive approach than is possible provincewide at the moment, has already identified and undertaken important groundbreaking work in 13 such neighbourhoods. These should be the foundation of the Province’s place-based work there, as should any The City of Toronto, using a more comprehensive approach than is possible provincewide at the moment, has already identified and undertaken important groundbreaking work in 13 such neighbourhoods. These should be the foundation of the Province’s place-based work there, as should any other defined, disadvantaged neighbourhoods in which other municipalities are already focusing work to address the roots of violence involving youth.    p. 346-347

Within all of these neighbourhoods, the Province should, as a governance initiative, work closely with the municipality to engage with residents and service providers in ways that build community strengths and a provincial-municipal-community culture of collaboration. This work must, of course, be done with great care to understand what is in place and working already in priority neighbourhoods.    p. 347

ii) Our Proposal

Based on the above premises, the core of our proposal is that the Province and municipal governments should come together with local agencies and community members in a partnership in each identified neighbourhood. They would do this by forming a Neighbourhood Strategic Partnership (NSP), modelled in part on Britain’s Local Strategic Partnerships (LSPs), and in part on the City of Toronto’s neighbourhood action teams and partnerships.    p. 347

As that funding can constitute in the range of 50 per cent of local authority budgets, the role and influence of the LSPs cannot be underestimated. By contrast, we do not see our Neighbourhood Strategic Partnerships as being involved across the whole of a municipality, nor as becoming involved in the whole provincial-municipal relationship. Our focus is on the roots of violence involving youth, and our interest in LSPs is focused on the vital governance role they can play on that issue, specifically in disadvantaged neighbourhoods.    p. 348

We believe that partnerships broadly similar to the local strategic partnerships should be established in each priority neighbourhood in Ontario. They should be anchored in representation from the provincial and municipal governments, and should also draw together the service providers in each neighbourhood and a number of community representatives. The federal government should be encouraged to take a seat at these tables and to play a significant role at them.    p. 350

For the Province, the internal alignment measures we propose, along with the public commitment to meeting the outcome targets provincewide, should already be achieving this, but those alignment measures would be strongly supported by the pressure for alignment being driven up from these partnerships. Similarly, the municipality, having endorsed this process and been at the partnership table, would also have a strong incentive to align its efforts and resources to help meet the targets.    p. 351

Similarly, we believe that the municipal focus on the roots issues at the NSP tables will drive alignment on the roots agenda at the municipal level, as the Toronto experience has already demonstrated, and lead to a desire to collaborate with the other orders of government.    p. 352

These inherent alignment pressures should mean that new structural mechanisms are unnecessary to bring governments together on the roots agenda. As well, as we have noted above in related contexts, the complexity of negotiating broad agreements encompassing numerous municipalities on the many issues relevant to the roots agenda would in all likelihood materially impede real progress on the many core issues.    p. 353

We believe that if the Province and the municipalities, and ideally the federal government as well, start their collaboration on the roots agenda at the neighbourhood level they will address the most pressing needs and also begin to develop better working relationships on the ground. It seems to us that on the basis of those relationships, and experience in these communities, they will know better whether a broader structure is necessary, and will be better placed to achieve it if it is. We also think the structure, if needed, will be a better one if brokered through experience in working together as a body involving service providers and community members.    p. 353

It seems to us that the Province and the municipalities could usefully consider making available a fund to facilitate this. That fund could support crisis counselling for youth and families who may have been traumatized by the enforcement exercise. The fund could also permit an immediate boost to key programs and activities in a community where police action has taken place. The boost to community programs and services would serve two purposes. First, the community would see immediate positive consequences following the police action, and might be more inclined to cooperate with the police as a result. And second, the increased activity in the community and on the streets could help the community take back its parks and streets before a new gang starts up to fill the vacuum created by the enforcement action.    p. 357

8.  To identify the neighbourhoods for the place-based approach, the Province should employ the Index of Relative Disadvantage we have proposed to determine on a provincewide basis the areas where disadvantage is most concentrated. Once the index results are available, the Province, through a lead ministry for community building, should immediately open discussions with the affected municipalities to identify local factors, such as the availability of services, for inclusion in the determination of the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods and to define the boundaries of such neighbourhoods.    p. 374

19. The Province must recognize the value of sports and arts in supporting learning, development and creativity of youth. The Province should work with municipalities, school boards and community agencies to remove barriers that include income level, transportation and a lack of usable space. The Province should move to immediately embed accessible sports and arts programs in the priority neighbourhoods. (pages 257–260)    p. 378

30. Steps Towards Community Hubs: There is an overwhelming consensus in favour of building community hubs and, accordingly, no reason to delay action on that front. In neighbourhoods where it is clear that the Index of Relative Disadvantage will demonstrate a high level of disadvantage, or where similar methodologies have already done so, the Province should promptly initiate discussions with the municipal governments, to begin to plan for a hub if none exists and in particular to determine the availability of recreational and arts facilities. Where the latter facilities are lacking, the Province should work actively with the Ontario Realty Corporation and the municipality to lease alternative space for youth and youth services until a hub is developed. Another winter and spring should not go by in the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods with there being no safe place for youth to gather and play.    p. 381

♦ Hold focused discussions on the Index of Relative Disadvantage with a view to finalizing it in time for an initial data run in early 2009. This will identify areas for conversations with municipalities to select and define the most disadvantaged neighbourhoods for the priority actions we outline.    p. 382

In the case of the first two items, the Province must move quickly to put in place the necessary governance structures. In the case of the other recommendations, and subject to discussions with municipal governments and community groups, we believe that substantial progress could be achieved within six months.    p. 382

Short to Medium-term Initiatives

We believe the Province must also work to make steady progress on the following components of our strategy and appreciate that several will require more in depth consultations among ministries and with municipal governments, agencies and community groups.    p. 382

♦ Launch an assessment of recreational, cultural and other hub needs with municipalities in areas identified as likely to be determined as areas of high disadvantage when the Index of Relative Disadvantage is run.    p. 383

♦ Begin discussions with the community agency sector on ways to streamline and stabilize their funding, involving municipal governments and other funders as appropriate.    p. 383

♦ As disadvantaged neighbourhoods are formally identified, work with municipalities to define areas for joint effort and begin to establish Neighbourhood Strategic Partnerships, or work within existing equivalent structures.    p. 384

Carter, G. (1979). Report to the Civic Authorities of Metropolitan Toronto and its Citizens. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto    p. 386

Pitman, W. (1977). Now Is Not Too Late. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto    p. 394

Mandate

♦ Formulate recommendations on:

◊ Immediate and longer-term actions and solutions involving all related parties, including government (provincial, federal, municipal), communities, private sector.    p. 400

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, The Impact of Urban Design and Infrastructure on Youth Violence    p. 408

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Youth Violence, the UK’s Neighbourhood Regeneration Strategy and Housing    p. 408

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing    p. 409

Expanding access to specialized courts for youth was also recommended, as well as improved availability of drug treatment, a central source of information for families and better access to mental health treatment with extension of the mandatory treatment period. Three-year funding was recommended for agencies showing positive results. The task force also encouraged municipalities to develop safe communities strategies.    p. 411

Canadian Criminal Justice Association (1989). Safer Communities: A Social Strategy for Crime Prevention in Canada. Canadian Journal of Criminology, 31 (August), 4–23

In association with major national organizations concerned with policing, social development, children and youth, natives and municipalities, the Canadian Criminal Justice Association set out a strategy for crime prevention calling for all levels of government, police, citizens, voluntary organizations and private enterprise to take responsibility.    p. 412

Carter, G. (1979). Report to the Civic Authorities of Metropolitan Toronto and its Citizens. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto.

The Council of Metropolitan Toronto asked Gerald Emmett Cardinal Carter, Catholic Archbishop of Toronto, to act as a mediator or conciliator between the civic authorities, in particular the police and minority groups in the city.    p. 412

Four-Level Government/African Canadian Community Working Group (1992). Towards a New Beginning: The Report and Action Plan of the Four-Level Government/African Canadian Working Group. Toronto: African Canadian Community Working Group

Federal, Ontario, City of Toronto and Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto officials and members of Toronto’s Black community formed a working group to formulate proposals for specific strategies to address the concerns of the Black community with respect to justice, social services, education, youth and policing.    p. 414

Pitman, W. (1977). Now Is Not Too Late. Toronto: Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto

In 1977, in the wake of incidents of violence toward the South Asian community in Toronto, Chairman of Metro Council Paul Godfrey appointed Walter Pitman, then-president of Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, as a one-man “Task Force on Human Relations” to probe the issue of racism in the city. He found that a disturbing degree of racial tension existed in the city and that the city had not yet addressed the issue of racism directly.    p. 423

The Role of Government

What, in your opinion, is the role of government (federal, provincial or municipal) in reducing violence involving youth in your neighbourhood. Please indicate whether you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree with each of the following statements.    p. 449

END


Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

ACCOUNTABILE ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: Major Root of Youth Violence


 



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