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Letters to Hazel McCallion: The McCallion Letters, “Request for a Meeting with the Mayor” Factum #1

October 4th, 2013  

City of Mississauga Corporate Security LETTERS TO HAZEL MCCALLION logo

[I REQUEST THAT THIS COMMUNICATION BE INCLUDED AS CORRESPONDENCE IN THE OCTOBER 9, 2013 COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES AND OCTOBER 21, 2013 GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE MINUTES]

Dear Madam Mayor,

I’m sitting on the floor outside the Security Office as Crime Awareness Day 2013 is happening all around me. I can think of no more fitting way to finally deliver on my February 2010 promise to meet with you to discuss my concerns relating to the City’s governance in general, and your Corporate Security “force” in particular.

Please remember that I requested permission to document our meeting on video and you responded with “anything you want”. I also understand that at best, I might be able to get an hour of your time. I propose that we meet on Monday, October 6, 2014 –just over a year from now. I chose this date for three reasons.

First I’ve attended enough court sessions to know that to make the most efficient use of time, lawyers exchange factums. I propose to do that as well –provide you a series of factums over the course of a year, to be included in Council and Governance Committee minutes. These factums will be Freedom of Information documents, and audio/video evidence (ie: Staff
interviews, meetings, speeches etc).

The Oxford dictionary defines “factum” as:

factum

noun (pluralfactums /-təmz/ or facta /-tə/) Law chiefly Canadiana
statement of the facts of a case.

I’m sure you’ll agree that if I state something supported with Freedom of Information, audio, or video evidence, then the factum will indeed be “facts of a case”. Your Staff can review each and respond where they see I might be in error. Or not.

Second, I propose meeting a year from now because by the time of our meeting I will be 65 and officially a senior.

My third and final reason for waiting a year is that I know that nothing I say or do will actually have any effect on anything, other than setting the record straight and finally answering your question.

What question?

You asked it during the October 16, 2008 Peel Police Homicide Information Session at Peel Regional Council. Frustrated by the spike in homicides that year, you’d asked Chief Metcalfe and Peel Regional Council, “We’re spending a lot of money on programs. What is missing?”

You asked “What is missing?” five years ago. I submit that the answer to your “What is missing?” goes a long way to explain what is missing in the McMurtry/Curling Review of the Roots of Youth Violence report.

The City’s 2013 Crime Awareness day is a rainy, gray affair and I’ve taken enough time sitting on the floor of the Great Hall.

So please slot a time for me for Monday, October 6, 2014 (or later). I look forward to a productive hour of your time.

You have my very best wishes,

Ursula
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

City of Mississauga Corporate Security boss Jamie Hillis' November 27. 2007 email secured through Freedom of Information


 

[Exhibit 1  Freedom of Information confirms ban of 9-10 year old girl Nov 14, 2008. Next page.]

City of Mississauga Corporate Security, Special Occurrence Report, 9/10 year old girl BANNED and punishment more harsh than many adults

 

 

[Exhibit 2   Email to Freedom of Information coordinator Barbara McEwan asking who at City of Mississauga Corporate Security told her the City’s banning database had only two fields. [BOLDED for emphasis. Grayed when less relevant]

From: MISSISSAUGA WATCH <mississauga_watch@yahoo.com>
To: Barbara McEwan <Barbara.McEwan@mississauga.ca>
Cc: Ken Owen <Ken.Owen@mississauga.ca>; mississauga_watch@yahoo.com
Sent: Wednesday, November 5, 2008 8:19 AM
Subject: Question regarding my February 2007 FOI request

Hi Ms. McEwan,I’ve just finished an email to Ken Owen clarifying what I would like for an update on the list of bans, trespasses and arrests (BTA’s) that I first requested as in FOI back in February 2007. Back then you may recall I told you that I was concerned about MissCorpSec’s banning practices and wanted to analyze their BTA records especially as it related to facility, ethnicity and age.If you were in Council back in December 2006 (yes, that long ago) it was the first time I tried to give a deputation on MissCorpSec practices.McCallion and Bench intmidated me so much that I chickened out and aborted.It’s been that long that I’ve been emailing The Corporation, trying to get McCallion et al to analyze the bans/trepasses/arrests of MissCorpSec especially as it pertained to “at-risk youth”. The Mayor’s subsequent December 2006 email-refusal to investigate and assurance that the city “treated all citizens fairly” led me to Freedom of Information.I came to you and FOI for MissCorpSec banning records.I know that in our talks about what I wanted in that first ban/trespass/arrest printout, I told you that I was worred about how MissCorpSec dealt with Youth and especially visible minority youth.I also informed you that I wished to analyze any trends based on facilities, age and even ethnicity of those banned, arrested etc. I requested records for a decade.You may recall that when you told me that MissCorpSec only began keeping computer records since January 2006. I hope that you can recall that you also said, that the only data MissCorpSec kept were  “two fields”.I’ve posted that FOI list to the Net long ago and allow me to aim you at just as an example. Please take a look.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/43172810@N00/448642308/sizes/o/in/set-72157600092315322/

As you can see Freedom of Information provided me with just two fields. “Date of Issue” and “Cause of Ban”.

You may recall that I was incredulous. I asked you how Mayor McCallion could assure me in email that Mississauga treated citizens fairly if MissCorpSec only kept those two fields and that therefore it was impossible to analyze and back up such an assurance.

You may recall the massive effort I expended to secure the original “tags” in order to snare more details like facility name, age etc even if it were just the arrests. You know that I even headed out to Burnamthorpe Court House for those tags. I even emailed McCallion again asking for an estimate of how much it would cost to find the “shadows” (the people banned, trespass, arrested) and tags.

Yet Brampton Corporate Security gave me the info (date, ban/tresp/arrest, cause, facility, age, ethnicity –even security guard name) right away (first time asking) –including a vast list of other security-related queries for $420. A true bargain (especially a Time bargain).

My prupose for writing. Question.

Who at MissCorpSec back in early 2007 (when I made that first printout request) told you that MissCorpSec only kep records of those two fields and that that would all I would ever be able to get?

Thanks.

 

 

[Exhibit 3    Email to Director Ken Owen asking in her December 2006 email, what data/stats did Madam Mayor use to make the assertion, “In any event, please be advised that the City treats all its residents fairly regardless of language or ethnicity.”  

Mr. Owen’s original email included for context.]

From: MISSISSAUGA WATCH <mississauga_watch@yahoo.com>
To: Ken Owen <Ken.Owen@mississauga.ca>
Cc: mississauga_watch@yahoo.com
Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2009 4:02 PM
Subject: Re: MISSCORPSEC FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (personal info) arrived today

 

Hi,

Me again. I’ve just did a quick check and have a new question.

You say that “the incident in question did not show up because it was related to a ban from all facilities while the search criteria that were driven by the FOI request was specific to Burnhamthorpe.”

To be clear, the incident in question was an “all community centres” ban originating from  Burnhamthorpe Archery Group.

I’ve just checked the Malton CC MissCorp/sec database printouts. They’re from the same FOI batch as the Burnhamthorpe one –stats from for all major community centres up to September 20, 2008.

So I’d assume that there’d be a  Burnhamthorpe-specific search, a McKechnie-specific search, a Malton-specific search, a RiverGrove one etc etc.

I’ve confirmed that so far three “all community centres” and “all facilities” bans show up DO for the Malton-specific FOI search..

So why not Burnhamthorpe?

So who at MissCorpSec confirmed your suspicions that the reason the Youth didn’t show was because the printout was for a facility-specific search. Because that’s simply wrong.

Or, I ask that he explain why “all community centres” “all City facilities” bans do show up in the Malton-specific searches arriving in the same batch as the Burnhamthorpe one.

The question that I have sir is this. Way back in December 2006 I alerted Hazel McCallion about concerns that I had re: treatment of at-risk youth and visible minorities at the nds of MissCorpSec.

Here’s what she wrote back.

“In any event, please be advised that the City treats all its residents fairly regardless of language or ethnicity.”

What data/stats did Madam Mayor use to make that assertion? Serious question.

Thanks



From:
Ken Owen <Ken.Owen@mississauga.ca>
To: MISSISSAUGA WATCH <mississauga_watch@yahoo.com>
Cc: Peter Meyler <peter.meyler@mississauga.ca>
Sent: Thursday, February 12, 2009 9:35:35 AM
Subject: RE: MISSCORPSEC FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (personal info) arrived today

Ursula

I’ve confirmed my suspicion that the incident in question did not show up because it was related to a ban from all facilities while the search criteria that were driven by the FOI request was specific to Burnhamthorpe.  The list provided to you with the decision letter is complete relative to the requested search criteria.

Ken Owen
Director, Facilities and Property Management
Corporate Services Department
City of Mississauga

905 615 3200 ext. 4206

 

 

 

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 15) Compliance with the Code of Conduct

January 30th, 2012  

 

MISSISSAUGA GOOD GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE   January 23 2012
This blog is a continuation of the following blog entries:

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 1) Line by line, word by word. Pages 1 through 5 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 2) “upholding both the letter of the law and the spirit of the laws and policies” Page 6 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 3) Beware “community events”, “volunteer services”, “arm’s length”… Pages 7 through 10 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 4) “providing persons…with an understanding and appreciation of the City of Mississauga or the workings of its municipal government” Pages 11 through 13 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 5) WTF?! “information deemed to be ‘personal information’ under the Municipal Conflict of Interest Act”?! Pages 14 through 15 of the Code.

City of Mississauga’s Elected Officials’ Records policy now online as a companion piece to the City’s Council Code of Conduct.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 6) Use of City Staff, Property, Services etc –and Election Campaigns Pages 16 through 18 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 7) Improper Use of Influence and Business Relations. Pages 19 through 20 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 8) Conduct at Meetings/When Representing the City and Media Communications. Pages 21 through 22 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 9) CITIZEN ALERT! Avoid Kafkaesque Rule 12′s Respectful Workplace Policy. Pages 22 through 24 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 10) Conduct Respecting Staff and the HUGE hidey-hole loophole. Pages 25 through 26 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 11) Employment of Council Relatives/Family Members. Page 27 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 12) Failure to Adhere to Council Policies and Procedures. Page 28 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 13) Reprisals and Obstruction. Page 29 of the Code.

Examining The City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct. (Part 14) Acting on Advice of Integrity Commissioner. Page 30 of the Code.

Again, for the record, my goal is to go through The City of Mississauga Code of Conduct, line by line, word by word as preparation for future Council deputations.

Once again, I will cut-and-paste the City of Mississauga Code of Conduct directly into this blog entry and offer comment/criticism [bold italics square brackets] when the need arises.

Those interested in accessing the full version of City of Mississauga Council Code of Conduct April 2011 please click here.


The City of Mississauga Council Code of Conduct

Council Code of Conduct April, 2011 (Page 31 –final page begins)

 Rule No. 18

Compliance with the Code of Conduct:

1. Upon receipt of recommendations from the Integrity Commissioner, Council may, in
circumstances where the Integrity Commissioner has determined there has been a violation
of the Code of Conduct, impose either of two penalties:

i) a reprimand; or
ii) suspension of the remuneration paid to the Member in respect of his/her services as a Member of Council or a local board, as the case may be, for a period of up to 90 days

[Interesting reference to “a local board”. It’s not really defined. However, regarding “board” it looks like the Code’s Rule No. 9 Conduct of Council at Committee Meetings and When Representing the City states:

3. Members shall make every effort to participate diligently in the activities of the committees, agencies, boards, commissions and advisory committees to which they are appointed by the City or by virtue of being an elected official.

The 2001 Municipal Act defines “local board” as:

“local board” means a municipal service board, transportation commission, public library board, board of health, police services board, planning board, or any other board, commission, committee, body or local authority established or exercising any power under any Act with respect to the affairs or purposes of one or more municipalities, excluding a school board and a conservation authority; (“conseil local”)

The 2001 Municipal Act authorizes municipalities to establish their own codes of conduct as seen here:

Code of conduct

223.2(1)  Without limiting sections 9, 10 and 11, those sections authorize the municipality to establish codes of conduct for members of the council of the municipality and of local boards of the municipality. 2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 98.

So, the City’s Council Code of Conduct’s reference to “local board” and the 2001 Municipal Act’s definition of “local board” would suggest that conduct of elected officials sitting on the Peel Police Services Board would fall within the mandate of the Integrity Commissioner.

Nope, sorry —citizens can’t get there from here. The 2001 Municipal Act ensured that elected officials sitting on police services boards are exempt from investigations by municipal integrity commissioners!

For the record, the 2001 Municipal Act, Part V.1, (ironically named) the “ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY” section, authorizes integrity commissioners to investigate “local boards”, then changes the meaning of “local boards” as defined in Part 1 of the Act!

“local board” means a local board other than,

(a) a society as defined in subsection 3 (1) of the Child and Family Services Act,

(b) a board of health as defined in subsection 1 (1) of the Health Protection and Promotion Act,

(c) a committee of management established under the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007,

(d) a police services board established under the Police Services Act,

(e) a board as defined in section 1 of the Public Libraries Act,

(f) a corporation established in accordance with section 203,

(g) such other local boards as may be prescribed; (“conseil local”)

And any elected officials sitting on any of these “local boards” are exempt! And notice that malevolent “(g) such other local boards as may be prescribed; (“conseil local”)”?  If I’m reading that correctly, elected officials can exempt any other local board they don’t want the integrity commissioner peeping into. Most obvious example would be elected officials sitting on the Enersource Board! Back to Page 31 of the Code.]

2. The Integrity Commissioner may also recommend that Council take the following actions:

i) removal from membership of a committee;
ii) removal as chair of a committee;
iii) repayment or reimbursement of monies received;
iv) return of property or reimbursement of its value;
v) a written and/or verbal request for an apology to Council, the complainant, or both.

[Items i) and ii) should prove interesting… Back to Page 31 of the Code.]

Commentary

Members are accountable to the public through the election process. Between elections they
may become disqualified and lose their seat if convicted of an offence under the Criminal
Code of Canada or for failing to declare a conflict of personal interest under the Municipal
Conflict of Interest Act, or for certain violations of the Municipal Elections Act, 1996.

[This paragraph is a wordy-wordy way of saying, “Members are only accountable on during the few hours every four years when the voting booth is open” … Back to Page 30 of the Code.]

In addition, the Municipal Act, 2001 authorizes Council to impose either of the two penalties
on a Member following a report by the Integrity Commissioner that, in his/her opinion, there
has been a violation of the Code of Conduct.

[A “reasonably informed person” would suspect that the Municipal Act, 2001 was written to favour municipalities, not the citizens they serve. A “reasonably informed person” would also suspect that the Association of Municipalities of Ontario (AMO) lobbied into overdrive massaging the Act to their advantage —meaning, create the illusion of accountability for the naive reader.  “Naive” is not meant to be derogatory —few people could be as naive as I once was.

Here’s something else. The 2001 Municipal Act grants integrity commissioners the power to transfer their powers and duties to “any person”. From the Act:

(3)  The [Integrity] Commissioner may delegate in writing to any person, other than a member of council, any of the Commissioner’s powers and duties under this Part. 2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 98.

Imagine how that section can be misused!

And the Municipal Act’s truly contemptuous of the public with this statement:

(5)  The [Integrity] Commissioner is not required to be a municipal employee. 2006, c. 32, Sched. A, s. 98.

Fact is, once hired by Mayor and Councillors, the Integrity Commissioner becomes a municipal employee!

The public are such SUCKERS!

31

END OF PAGE 31, THE LAST PAGE OF THE CODE.

I’ve finished going line by line through all 31 pages of the City of Mississauga’s Council Code of Conduct.

Now comes the hard part…

 

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Hazel McCallion: Mississauga Judicial Inquiry Report "Updating Ethical Infrastructure"

Peel Police Services Board: Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office (and the Ontario Ombudsman)

May 4th, 2011  

On January 23, 2008 Mr, Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office introduced himself to the Peel Police Services Board and explained his role in implementing Bill 103, Independent Police Review Act, 2007.

Note that Mr. McNeely’s presentation including question and answer session was 19:37 minutes long and edited to fit as closely as possible into Mississauga Council 10 minute deputation time-frame. Throughout Mr. McNeely’s presentation, the microphone kicked in and out resulting at least some of the time in a hiss-pop-crackle audio track.

It is what it is.

This video was shown at today’s Mississauga General Committee meeting as an information item. MISSISSAUGAWATCH will submit this blog entry into the May 4, 2011 Council meeting minutes. As is now our practice we provide this video, followed by the transcript.

Peel Police Services Board: Gerry McNeely, Director, Independent Police Review Office (10:24 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

First I waned to say that I’m hoping to carry out my duties and my responsibilities in an extremely collaborative manner. I’m hoping to create a relationship with police boards, police chiefs, police associations and obviously, members of the large public that I’m obligated to provide services to.

[DIP TO BLACK]

My role is to implement Bill 103 to deal with conduct complaints against police. But I see that role as one, to try to firstly to continue to increase and improve what I say is the great trust and confidence that most Canadians and most Ontarians have in police and policing.

[DIP TO BLACK]

90% of Canadians have great trust and confidence in police and policing so we’re talking about my focus being 10% of the general public that have some concerns.

[DIP TO BLACK]

We will develop clear criterias [sic]. [microphone comes on] Now you can hear me. We will develop very clear criterias [sic] to do so and that will be made known to everyone. And that is part of the transparency that I’m talking about.

So there will be very tight criterias. [sic] I’m still working on them. But there’s a level of understanding in administrative law and other areas as to the interpretation and the standards for vexatious etc and we’ll be looking at those and applying them very similarly.

I should advise you though that it is my intent that —and I’m trying to tell chiefs, don’t disband the Professional Standards Branches, they have a lot of work to do. Because I intend to send as many complaints back to the original Police Services as possible to continue to deal with.

The difference is, I will be overseeing it to some extent and because I have to be notified at the start and I’ll be there at the end.

So that’s a real difference but generally the bulk of investigations and dealing with complaints will be dealt with at the local level. And, but I’ll be making those extremely clear in regards to the policies and procedures that will be implemented.

[DIP TO BLACK]

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Are you going to try to establish a level of complaint that would become on your radar, if you will, in a more concentrated fashion? And complaints below that level would be handled, continue to be handled, in-house? Is that your intent?

Because if you replicate the number of complaints across the province, if you don’t, you’ll have an enormous organization that will probably never get from here to there.

It’s a tough job.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you for that observation, I agree with you. I did not anticipate it was gonna be this tough when I took the job. As after six months I’ve come to that realization but, to answer your question, I’m not going to establish necessarily the categories of level of complaints.

Every complaint we will look at seriously. That is one of the things the community is saying. They want to make sure what if they make a complaint that it’s taken seriously. So we will take it seriously. We will screen it. We will categorize it.

As I’ve indicated, most of the complaints will go back to the original service and will be surely-monitored through the process. There are some complaints for specific reasons, I may choose to send to another service to be investigated. And I’ll do that in consultation with the originated chief, if I can call it that and the chief that I’m going to send it to.

If I can give you an example.

If we were to look at a smaller police service, not Peel, and there may be a number of officers involved so there may be conflicts, I would like to err on the side of caution and call Chief Metcalf and say, you know, Chief, I’d like to send this to you to investigate.

So when will I determine that my office will keep a complaint? Similarly there has to be some over-arching concern that has come to my attention that I would want to do it. It may involve a senior-ranking officer.

So I have not totally established those categories and I’m not going to be rigid of them because I want to look at them on a case-by-case basis. Because something that may at first blush may appear to be something that I may want to retain, after I’ve done some preliminary investigation, [inaudible], you know what this is really not necessary. And I’ll send it back to the original chief.

So those things will be looked at in a case-by-case basis bearing in mind that every complaint, I’m going to consider it to be a serious complaint.

[DIP TO BLACK]

In the first year or two you’ll see a spike of complaints —about 25 to 30 percent increase and then it tapers off again back  to where it came from.

So that spike may necessitate some more investigations by local chiefs but I don’t see it as creating a huge budgetary strain on the service at the same time. But as I said, I intend to send most —80 percent back to the originating chiefs to be dealt with. Which to some extent is what’s being done now, except there will be a little spike because of the newness of the program.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Well, as I said to you previous [sic], on behalf of this board, I may not, I think we really do believe in being proactive and if training is an issue  and you see things that we can do different [sic] or suggest what we might do different [sic] in our training, I think from this board you’ll have a lot of support for those kinds of issues.

Because that’s really what makes you more sustainable in your operation and your budget and if we can resolve that process, by in the training process, then I think you’ll get a lot of support from this board and from our chief management team also. So thank you for mentioning that.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you for those words, Mr. Chair, and I really appreciate that.

[DIP TO BLACK]

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I just want to touch on a brief point and just mention it. It’s what we refer to as walk-in traffic. If a citizen comes into one of our divisions and gets an audience with the staff sergeant —and it might be a point of law, it might be a point of procedure, and it’s resolved. And the individual walks out happy because it’s all been explained to him.

Is this something you expect us to report?

How is the commission going to deal with that?

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Good question.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I know we touched on it briefly.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Very good question.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Maybe you’re had seconds thoughts. (chuckles)

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

I’m hoping that that process you’ve just described, Chief, we’ll refer to as an” inquiry”. Coming out of that inquiry, if someone walks in and needs some clarification, and you know, someone walks often time people say, you know, I have a complaint but I really don’t want to make a complaint, right? Because it’s really not a complaint —it’s an inquiry.

You know, I got a ticket and, you know, it says I was going 60 in a 40 zone and the sign says 50, I don’t know. It’s really an explanation they’re looking for. That, I’m hoping to have us term as an “inquiry” and I’m hoping that it will be dealt with and that it will be dealt with at the station at the Service.

And all that I would need out of that is some basic information —I don’t need a complaint out of that or form out of that. [inaudible]

Then the next stage is someone comes in and say [sic] I want to make a complaint, we’re going to call that, we’re going to try to change the terminologies. And one of the terminology[sic]  that people tell me is confusing to them is “informal resolution”.

Now the legislation talks about it but hopefully through a regulation I’ll be able to say “informal resolution means any one of the following” and I’m hoping to call those a “local resolution”. So to try to resolve it at the local station or local service.

And so, to take, there will still— And the person still has the option of filing a complaint. But if they choose to go into this local resolution process, they’ll sign a document (that will) say that “I know I can file a complaint but I’m choosing to do this instead.” And again, that’s the only form that I really needed.

So, I don’t know if I answered your question, Chief.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

You did. You do want us to report it.

And I guess that’s— I would suggest then that the complaints are going to go up more than 25 percent. Because I think we deal with a lot at the divisions and really Mr. McNeely, with respect, we have to, at some point, deal with the paperwork —the amount of work that’s put on our staff sergeants and our sergeants for an issue that’s just clearly a misunderstanding between the citizen and the officer involved.

You know, an inquiry or a complaint, you know, I really find that difficult, I really do.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

And I appreciate that, Chief and I’m being cognizant of that. But my understanding is someone walks in and makes those inquiry [sic], there’s still a note made somewhere and I’m asking basically for the same information of that desk note that’s made. I’m not asking for anything different.

And so I’m cognizant of exactly what you’ve indicated about the increase in workload and my intent of not to do that. So the information I’ll be seeking is no different than the sergeant making a note at the desk that John Doe came in and we talked.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

It might be something as simple as a notebook entry.

Gerry McNeely Director, Independent Police Review Office (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

That’s right.

Peel Regional Police Chief Mike Metcalf (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Thank you.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting January 23, 2009)

Okay, any other questions? Staff? No?

Again I want to thank you very much for taking the time to come out….

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: OUR ONTARIO OMBUDSMAN

MISSISSAUGAWATCH ATTENDS "SHARPEN YOUR TEETH III" CONFERENCE/WORKSHOP ONTARIO OMBUDSMAN'S OFFICE  (December 2, 2009 am)

Speech. Bill 103: quis custodiet ipsos custodies?

André Marin, Ombudsman of Ontario
Submissions to the Standing Committee on Justice Policy respecting Bill 103, An Act to establish an Independent Police Review Director and create a new public complaints process by amending the Police Services Act,
Toronto, January 30, 2007.

1 The government of Ontario deserves credit for introducing Bill 103, which reforms the police public complaints process and establishes the office of the Independent Police Review Director, a new police oversight agency with wide-ranging powers to oversee and investigate police complaints.  Independent civilian oversight of the police enriches democracy by enhancing accountability.  It also encourages our constabulary to constantly strive for best practices.

2 The new government body, however, is just that – a government body.  No matter how independent or arm’s-length of the rest of government it may be, it still reports back through a boss who is part of the executive branch of government.  In Ontario, we are fortunate enough to have an office reporting to the Legislative Assembly which provides independent oversight of all government bodies.  Since 1975, all provincial ministries, boards, commissions and agencies have been under the purview of the Ombudsman of Ontario, an officer of the Provincial Parliament.  For over 30 years, the approach to oversight and accountability in this province has been principled, consistent and predictable.  The Ombudsman has been there for tens of thousands of Ontarians, overseeing government involvement in every aspect of their lives, from womb to tomb, from cradle to grave, and standing up for them when they encounter problems.

3 But the Office of the Ombudsman won’t be there for anyone who might want to complain about the workings of this powerful new government body.  As parliamentarians, that should disturb you.  You should ask yourselves what causes the government to create an exception to this rule.  What is the overriding and overarching principle that would support parking the province’s main accountability vehicle at the door when we are talking about a new police review body?  I can think of no such principle.

4 In that same vein, you should also ask yourselves: “If not the Ombudsman, who will oversee this new agency?”  Indeed, the history of police complaints bodies in Ontario is not a happy one and cries out for oversight.  It is a history replete with allegations of bias, plodding bureaucracies and inefficiencies.  These bodies have come in and out of vogue over the years, like the flavour of the month.  We can only hope that history will not repeat itself.  But if it does, who will investigate this new super-agency?  Quis custodiet ipsos custodies: Who will guard the guards themselves?  Who can the police or the public turn to if someone is dissatisfied with the delicate decisions this government body will make regarding complaints against the police?

5 The answer is no one.  Buried deep in the entrails of the Bill is a particularly troublesome provision, section 97.  Remarkably, section 97 of Bill 103 states, “The Ombudsman Act does not apply to anything done under this part.”  This section effectively prevents the Ombudsman – and by extension the Legislative Assembly – from overseeing how this government body conducts its business of investigating complaints.  This, in my view, is a grave flaw that must be addressed and corrected.  It is bad news for the public in general and bad news for police in particular, who would otherwise enjoy the benefits that come with independent oversight by an officer of parliament.

6 Let me put it in context.  The Independent Police Review Director will be a potent arbiter of disputes between citizens and the police, with extraordinary authority – including the ability to issue summonses, enter premises and seize evidence.  The Director will wield tremendous power over chiefs of police, all Ontario police officers and, of course, citizens who complain to him or her, but will enjoy a privileged enclave accountable only internally to the Attorney General of Ontario.  No court can reach into the Director’s filing cabinet; no court can receive the Director’s testimony or try the Director civilly.  No complaint about the processes, practices and policies of the Director’s office can be independently investigated or resolved through shuttle diplomacy, and no recommendations can be made for reform in cases where a complaint against the Director is valid.

7 As I stated at the outset, in Ontario, by default, every provincial government organization, whether it’s the Ministry of the Attorney General, the Special Investigations Unit, the Coroner’s office or even the soon-to-be-reinvigorated Ontario Human Rights Tribunal, is subject to the statutory oversight of the Ombudsman, who is an officer of the Legislature.  It is the legislated function of the Ombudsman of Ontario to investigate and to make recommendations if a government body conducts its business in a way that is contrary to law, unreasonable, unjust, oppressive, improperly discriminatory or just plain wrong.  However, the Independent Police Review Director has been sheltered from this external and effective oversight.

8 Coming back to the fundamental question for you to ask yourselves as parliamentarians, what public policy would justify the removal of this government body from being accountable to you through the office of the Ombudsman?  Why should there be two different accountability regimes for the provincial government – one for the police complaints body and one for everybody else?

9 I have monitored with interest the debates in the Legislature over section 97.  A member of the Legislative Assembly, speaking on behalf of the government, justified the section’s existence on the basis that a similar provision existed in 1990 and, in any case, oversight still exists in the form of judicial review if someone’s not happy with the decisions of the new Director.  My answer to the first argument, with the greatest of respect, is: So what?  If the whole rationale for passing this legislation is to provide a new complaints commission from the ground up, why would you feel compelled to hang on to a relic from the failed past?  Why allow a provision that should not have been there in the first place to somehow muddle the present?

10 The exclusion of the Ombudsman in the Police Services Act is in fact an accident of history, carried over from the time when a police oversight body was initially created on a pilot basis for the Metropolitan Toronto Police in 1981.  At that time, one of the primary reasons for excluding the Ombudsman was the municipal nature of the police force.  When civilian oversight of police was extended throughout the province in 1990, this provision was simply replicated.  It has existed not for sound public policy reasons, but solely by happenstance.  It has managed to cling on, unchallenged, from one era to the next, from one Police Services Act to the next.

11 The Honourable Patrick J. LeSage’s April 2005 Report on the Police Complaints System in Ontario, commissioned by the government of Ontario, speaks for itself.  At no time does the report recommend a break from the provincial accountability regime or the role of the Ombudsman in providing oversight on behalf of the Legislative Assembly.  If, somehow in your deliberations, this honourable committee’s final judgment on Bill 103 hinges on whether or not, as has been suggested by a government member, Mr. LeSage really intended for the Ombudsman to retain oversight of this body, I would suggest you invite Mr. LeSage to come forward and testify before you.  You will then be able to ask him the very question I have put to him and satisfy yourselves as to what he truly intended.

12 As for the argument that you don’t need Ombudsman oversight because you can always go to court, this, with respect, is a red herring.  You can always bring to court any government body on a myriad of issues.  It’s not a substitute for the role of the Ombudsman.  Going to divisional court is a narrow and technical affair, a costly enterprise and an adversarial process. Upon reflection, I am sure you will agree with me that that is not the answer you would want to provide to constituents who are unhappy with the course of their complaints to the Independent Police Review Director.

13 You might be asking yourselves what happens in other provincial jurisdictions when dealing with oversight of police complaints.  In Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Quebec and Saskatchewan, either the provincial Ombudsman or another specialized Officer of Parliament has jurisdiction to intervene.  In all of these jurisdictions, their respective legislative assembly retains the power and ability to involve itself in the investigation of complaints against the police through an officer of Parliament.  If this bill passes, Ontario will have the dubious distinction of being the only jurisdiction where police complaints are outside the reach of parliamentarians.  It behooves you to not let that happen.

14 What can you do?  Simple: Delete section 97 from the Bill.

—André Marin, Ombudsman of Ontario

Mississauga Council video presentation, “Hazel McCallion Mayor’s Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga ‘raised mmmillions of dollars'”

April 13th, 2011  

This video was shown at the April 13, 2011 Mississauga Council meeting. MISSISSAUGAWATCH will submit this entire blog for the record in the April 13, 2011 Council meeting minutes. As is now our practice we provide this video, followed by the transcript.

Hazel McCallion Mayor’s Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga “raised mmmillions of dollars” (10:11 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT with freeze-frames from actual video]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

Regarding the Mayor’s galas, Mississauga Council is going to limit me to ten minutes. So I’m going to let Councillor Nando Iannicca detail the concerns surrounding this annual fund-raising event.

Freeze-frame "McCallion-backed Ron Starr (left) and Councillor Nando Iannicca" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

—I trust the donors are aware, were aware that when you gave a dollar only six or seven cents went to the entity. And I’m starting to think that they’re not because of how tax receipts were issued. But perhaps that will come back.

I wonder what rapprochement’s been done with the charities when they now know, and I didn’t know, —I don’t think a lot of people knew, that you had this grand fete with the City’s elites. And at the end of the day for every dollar that came in, eighty cents was consumed.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

And when we look at Commissioner Breault’s February 24, 2011 report, she writes that in 2005 the ticket cost of $400.00, 50% was allocated for donation.

And yet when you go and check on what actually happened, you can see that in 2005, the $400.00 ticket, only 24% percent went into actual proceeds.

Freeze-frame "Percent proceeds of Mayor's Gala" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

And the Commissioner continues that for 2006, the ticket cost was $500.00 of which 40% was allocated for a donation.

And yet when you look in 2006, the proceeds were actually less, just twenty-two percent.

That’s difficult enough to swallow if you’re a private individual, but imagine some of these publicly-funded agencies over here, who also bought tickets.

Freeze-frame "publicly funded agencies who pissed away 80% on entertainment, food and drink" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

So we’ve got Trillium Health Centre here. $2,000.00. And that’s got to be publicly-funded money, or donations that they received from people. And now what they’re doing is they’re taking their $2,000.00 and flushing 80% of it, and only $400.00 go to the arts!

And I would think that anybody who donated to the Trillium Health Centre wanted that $2,000 to go into Health.

Now there’s a March 7, 2011 article in the Toronto Star —”(Peel) Police board spent thousands on mayors’ gala [sic]” and I want to read some of the highlights to you now.

The Peel Police Services Board has bought tens of thousands of dollars worth of tickets to private mayoral galas in Brampton and Mississauga, using “proceeds of crime”—

Minutes show, for example, that the board approved buying a $4,000 table at Fennell’s gala on Feb. 20 last year, on Fennell’s invitation. A month before the gala took place, then-board member Jim Murray put forward a motion to buy a second table. It was approved.

A big player in Mississauga’s real estate market and close friend of McCallion, Murray is one of the organizers of her annual arts gala. In 2008, Fennell moved that the police board buy a $6,000 table for McCallion’s gala that November.

Now you remember October 2008 don’t you?

[DIP TO WHITE]

Freeze-frame "Peter Mansbridge, October 6, 2008 The National"" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

 

Peter Mansbridge (The National CBC, October 6, 2008)

Good evening. The world’s stock markets answered a desperate call today —Sell!

They torpedoed into new territory as the financial crisis tightened its grip on the global economy.

The Dow fell almost 370 points before closing below 10,000 for the first time in four years. Earlier in the day, the TSX plunged almost 1,200 points —its biggest one-day drop on records.

—Canadians fear their savings are slip-sliding away.

Freeze-frame "TSX performance just prior to October 17, 2008 Peel Police Services Board meeting" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

As the real world debated Recession or Depression, witness the Peel Police Services Board take $6,000 of public funds and lavish $4,800 of it on Mayor McCallion’s evening of entertainment, food and drink.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Also there’s another special request. Would someone like to move that for the Mississauga—

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Oh, I’ll move that. (laughs)

Freeze-frame "Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell at October 17, 2008 Peel Police Services Board meeting" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

(general laughter)

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

All those in favour? Carried.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

And the economy got worse. And by January 23, 2009 we see Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell vote for her own gala at this Peel Police Services Board meeting.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Item number 20 then is an event from the Special Policy —uh the Special Fund area. Mr. Murray.

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Yes. Mr. [inaudible]

This year’s recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award for the City of Brampton at the Mayor’ annual gala for the community, and for the Brampton community is the past vice chair [inaudible] and two-time member of this Board over many many years, Mr. Webb.

Mr. Ron Webb, and I think it will be appropriate if this Board was to buy two tables to this event. Primarily for that reason but also to recognize that this might be a difficult year to sell some subscriptions to this event, and it’s a worthy event. It supports the community —it supports the [inaudible] of this award. I would move that we purchase two tables.

Freeze-frame "Jim Murray" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Is there a seconder? Okay. Any other questions? If not, all those in favour? Carried.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reading from National Post article, “Mississauga Mayor’s Gala faces allegations of corruption” Megan O’Toole)

“This was never intended, nor was it billed as, and nor was it sold as a fundraiser,” Mr. Murray said.

Doug Fowles (Gala promotional video shown at Hazel McCallion’s $350.00 a ticket 90th Birthday Bash, February 12, 2011)

It was originally started to raise money for the arts —for the construction of the Living Arts Centre.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reading from National Post article, “Mississauga Mayor’s Gala faces allegations of corruption” Megan O’Toole)

“—and nor was it sold as a fundraiser,” Mr. Murray said.

Toronto Sun columnist Ted Woloshyn (Gala promotional video shown at Hazel McCallion’s $350.00 a ticket 90th Birthday Bash, February 12, 2011)

—now in its 25th year, raised mmmillions of dollars to support the arts, culture and heritage in the community—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

As Ted Woloshyn should know, “raised mmmillions of dollars to support the arts, culture and heritage” is not the same thing as supporting with millions of dollars raised.

[DIP TO BLACK]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

To that point. Appendix 7 shows that the Mayor’s gala raised $3,737,000 of which only $768,000 was ever returned to the community in donations.

Freeze-frame "Mayor's Gala NOT-millions donations" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

The same appendix shows that there’s $2,340,000 of the Mayor’s fund was donated to the Mississauga Community Foundation [sic]. So essentially you have a foundation within a foundation.

[DIP TO BLACK]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

And Councillor McFadden asked Mississauga Staff, “What year did the Mississauga Community Foundation receive $2,340,000 from the accumulated gala funds and how many projects (with amounts) have received grants from that fund to date?

And Commissioner Breault’s response is, “The $2,340,000 was transferred from the City at the end of 2006 to the Mississauga Community Foundation [sic]. The City has no information regarding projects which received grants through this Foundation.”

Freeze-frame "Hazel McCallion admits losing $28,000 from gala fund" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

Mayor Hazel McCallion (Mississauga General Committee meeting, November 19, 2008)

I like your stabilization. I think it is the answer —one of the answers to the situation.

I only wish I knew about it before I turned my money over to the Community Foundation. Cuz last year I lost $28,000 out of my funding. And no interest on it.

When it was left with the City, it was getting 3% interest —on a couple of million dollars, which is nothing to— So instead, last year I lost $28,000 out of capital which is unfortunate.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

As to Councillor McFadden’s question, “how many projects (with amounts) have received grants from that fund to date”?

Commissioner Breault had written, “The City has no information regarding projects which received grants through this Foundation,” —easy answer.

Freeze-frame "Community Foundation of Mississauga confirms McCallion's fund donated ZERO back to community between 2007 to current" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

Go to the internet. Answer is Zero. Nothing. Not in 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010. Zero.

Regarding the report by Commissioner Breault in response to Councillor McFadden’s questions, the Commissioner writes that “staff have completed their research and are providing the following based on information available in the City’s financial records.”

What that means is that answers could be elsewhere and they’ve limited their research to the financial records and that’s all.

[DIP TO WHITE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

Councillor McFadden asked specifically about the receipts. She asked about receipts for the 2005 gala, the 2006 gala and also the 2007.

And Commissioner Breault’s response is, “The City has no information to respond.”

There is a way of finding out about receipts —you just Google.

[DIP TO WHITE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

Yep there it is. “How long should you keep your tax receipts?” There it is —six years.

So we should be able to get tax receipts from City Staff and councillors who attended Mayor’s galas all the way back to 2004!

And what you get is the Mayor’s Gala website. And it looks like it’s called “IT’S A FULL HOUSE”. Kenny Rogers.

And we just go through really quickly.

And what we get is a picture of Brenda Breault herself in 2005! And there’s Councillor Prentice.

Let’s keep going. There’s the City Manager! So certainly she’ll be able to help us produce the receipts for 2005.

We’ve got Councillor Pat Mullin and we’ve got Martin Powell, Commissioner of Public Works and Transportation.

Let’s go to 2006.

There’s Ron Starr —Councillor Starr.

This guy right there. Ken Owen, Director of Facility and Properties Management. Also Director of Mississauga Corporate Security.

Freeze-frame "Ken Owen, Director of Facilities and Properties Management (aka Mississauga Corporate Security Grand Skulk" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

I know he’d be happy to hand over a tax receipt. How fortunate.

Who can help us for tax receipts for 2007? Maja Prentice again. She’d be able to help us. Former Councillor.

[DIP TO WHITE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting April 10, 2011)

So we’ve got City Staff for 2005, 2006 and 2007 —and councillors who could help us by producing tax receipts!

Freeze-frame "2005, 2006, 2007 gala years" from video "Hazel McCallion Mayor's Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga "raised mmmillions of dollars"

Here’s my tax receipt to the Mayor’s $350.00 a ticket 90th Birthday Bash. That easy!

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Last, for the record, this afternoon I sent the following email and requested it go into the April 13, 2011 Council minutes.

[EMAIL BEGINS]

—– Forwarded Message —-
From: MISSISSAUGA WATCH <mississauga_watch@yahoo.com>
To: hazel.mccallion@mississauga.ca; Jim Tovey <Jim.Tovey@mississauga.ca>; pat.mullin@mississauga.ca; Chris Fonseca <Chris.Fonseca@mississauga.ca>; frank.dale@mississauga.ca; eve.adams@mississauga.ca; Ron Starr <Ron.Starr@mississauga.ca>; nando.iannicca@mississauga.ca; katie.mahoney@mississauga.ca; pat.saito@mississauga.ca; sue.mcfadden@mississauga.ca; george.carlson@mississauga.ca; janice.baker@mississauga.ca; Brenda Breault <Brenda.Breault@mississauga.ca>; Mary Ellen Bench <maryellen.bench@mississauga.ca>; Crystal Greer <Crystal.Greer@mississauga.ca>
Cc: motoole@nationalpost.com; rjames@thestar.ca; city@thestar.ca; gtimbers@mississauga.net; jstewart@mississauga.net; mississauga_watch@yahoo.com
Sent: Thu, April 14, 2011 2:51:25 PM
Subject: Yesterday’s Council Mayor’s Gala video deputation is now online. And comment regarding Jim Tovey’s claim to have admired the coat of arms back in 2005.

[Hi Ms. Greer, I’m requesting that you include this correspondence in yesterday’s Council minutes or failing that, in the minutes of the next Council, please.]

Hi Council.

Yesterday’s Council Mayor’s Gala video deputation is now online.

“Hazel McCallion Mayor’s Gala Scandal: MYTHissauga “raised mmmillions of dollars”

at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFvgoWgLr30

My other reason for writing. I have video of Jim Tovey claiming to have admired the craftsmanship of the Mayor’s beautiful coat of arms “hanging on the wall” back in 2005 when he was a mere carpenter fresh from a construction site on his first visit to the Mayor’s office to talk about the power plant.

Please check out the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry’s exhibit “Holding-Mayors Gala Fund” at:

www.mississaugainquiry.ca/exhibits/pdf/Exhibit_578_COM005001350.pdf

It shows “30-Jun-09 Mayor’s Coat of Arm’s -$15,212.05”

I find it remarkable that Mr. Tovey has such vivid, fond memories of admiring this coat of arms back in 2005 when it was only paid for on June 30, 2009!

“To be persuasive we must be believable; to be believable we must be credible; credible we must be truthful .” –Edward R. Murrow

Best wishes,
MISSISSAUGAWATCH

[EMAIL ENDS]

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Hazel McCallion Mayor’s Gala Scandal: illegal tax receipts and just 20 cents per dollar to charity

March 14th, 2011  

This Blog is a follow-up to our March 10, 2011 Blog, “HAZEL MCCALLION’S MAYOR’S GALA SCANDAL ‘…without question what we’ve done is illegal under the Revenue Act of Canada.’

Hazel McCallion's Mayor's Gala RECEIPTS for public agencies 2005 and 2006

Today, we present the man behind so many of the Mayor’s Galas over the years —reaching as far back as 1991 and as recently as being Chair of Hazel McCallion’s $350.00 a ticket 90th Birthday Celebration Bash.

Mississauga News pic: Hazel’s 90th. Details of Mayor Hazel McCallion's 90th birthday festivities were announced today at the Living Arts Centre by organizing committee members, from left, Ray Lessard (senior vice-president, wealth advisor, BMO Nesbitt Burns), committee chair Jim Murray and Dr. Jeff Zabudsky, president and chief executive officer of Sheridan College. Staff photo by Fred Loek
(Jim Murray, chair of the Mayor’s 90th Birthday Celebration Committee, middle)

So here’s the video complete with transcript.

Hazel McCallion Mayor’s Gala Scandal: illegal tax receipts and just 20 cents per dollar to charity (11:02 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

There’s been considerable controversy regarding Mayors’ galas both here in Mississauga as well as Brampton. And I just want to explain one of the most startling revelations regarding these galas.

In the case of Hazel McCallion’s November gala that has been going on all the way back to 1987, it was revealed that for every dollar of the ticket price only twenty cents actually goes to charity. And of those twenty cents, only six or seven actually goes [sic] to the arts. And yet the gala is “for the arts”.

And rather than me express the concerns, why not take it directly from Councillor Nando Iannicca.

[REVERSE CLOCK-WIPE]

Councillor Frank Dale, Acting Mayor (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Councillor Iannicca.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Well, I wanted to follow up on the previous concerns from Councillor McFadden with regards to items she raised. But more important, the information that’s come back from the Staff in regards to the Mayor’s Gala.

And I understand more is to come back.

I just want to be clear on what is coming back and the action we’re taking, that something that to be very candid, just from the media accounts, looks dreadfully appalling. And looks like a whole bunch of people feel cheated.

And so I want some clarity around the issues when they come back, I want it to be very clear, and I want to say it here at Council, that these are the list of concerns. And the one specifically that relates to us as Board of Directors of the Corporation.

But first is, I trust the donors are aware, were aware that when you gave a dollar only six or seven cents went to the entity. And I’m starting to think that they’re not because of how tax receipts were issued. But perhaps that will come back.

I wonder what rapprochement’s been done with the charities when they now know, and I didn’t know, —I don’t think a lot of people knew, that you had this grand fete with the City’s elites. And at the end of the day for every dollar that came in, eighty cents was consumed.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

The donors would have been better off giving them half as much directly and some of the charities are saying exactly that.

So I hope that comes back.

I’m sure a lot of taxpayers feel cheated because if my math is correct, only from the accounts, some of the entities who wholeheartedly and graciously gave money would have got bigger business receipts and charity receipts than the charities got in actual money.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

Now there’s a March 7th, 2011 article in the Toronto Star, “Peel police board spent thousands on mayors’ galas”.

There’s [sic] two factual errors. One, they stated that Hazel McCallion was on the Peel Police Board. That’s not the case. And in another, they had stated that the Special Fund that Peel Police were using was intended to be used for victims of crime. That too was not the case.

But I want to read some of the highlights now.

The Peel Police Services Board has bought tens of thousands of dollars worth of tickets to private mayoral galas in Brampton and Mississauga, using “proceeds of crime”—

And that’s true.

Minutes show, for example, that the board approved buying a $4,000 table at Fennell’s gala on Feb. 20 last year, on Fennell’s invitation. A month before the gala took place, then-board member Jim Murray put forward a motion to buy a second table. It was approved.

A big player in Mississauga’s real estate market and close friend of McCallion, Murray is one of the organizers of her annual arts gala.

And what I want to do now is just highlight just how close a friend Jim Murray is to Hazel McCallion.

For context at Hazel McCallion’s $350.00 a ticket 90th birthday party, where he said—

[CROSS-FADE]

Jim Murray, close friend of the Mayor and CHAIR of Hazel McCallion’s $350.00 a ticket 90th Birthday Bash Celebration, February 12, 2011]

I love you, Hazel.

(laughter from audience)

That’s not what Bridget said, by the way. She said, “What could be more beautiful than a lady growing wise with age?”

[DIP TO WHITE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

In addition we find that Jim Murray has been a organizer of the Mayor’s Galas going all the way back to 1991.

And what emerges is that you’ve got a devoted, close friend of the Mayor sitting on the Peel Police Services Board.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And when you know of the devotion, the allegiance, the loyalty that Jim Murray, who the Toronto Star calls, “a big player in Mississauga’s real estate market”, has toward Hazel McCallion, then you can view his impassioned speech on October 28, 2009, when he tried to stop the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry —in a different light.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Jim Murray, close friend of the Mayor and at the time, Vice Chair of the Peel Police Service Board (“Stop the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry” deputation, October 28, 2009]

My name is Jim Murray. I live at in Mississauga.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH, whispering into camera (videotaping Murray’s “Stop the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry” deputation, October 28, 2009]

Peel Police Services Board.

Jim Murray, close friend of the Mayor and at the time, Vice Chair of the Peel Police Service Board (“Stop the Mississauga Judicial Inquiry” deputation, October 28, 2009]

I didn’t come to speak today. I came to listen to find out what was going on.

There isn’t a single person on this Council I don’t know, and know well. Some of you I’ve known for a long time and I’ve worked with you. And I’ve had a respect for each member of Council.

I’ve lived her most of my life. I choose to make my business here. And I’m sad.

I’m very sad.

Because what you are embarking on, I suspect there wouldn’t be five people in this room who’ve ever been in a Judicial Inquiry. Well I have. In 1975. And it’s ugly and it takes on a life of its own. And it destroys people.

If what you really want to do is find out if anybody has a conflict of interest or anybody has done anything untoward, or anybody wants to clear the air, pass a resolution to hire an integrity commissioner like most municipalities have and GET ON WITH LIFE!

[strong applause with a “Here Here!”]

[CLOCK-WIPE]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

And returning to the Toronto Star.

A big player in Mississauga’s real estate market and close friend of McCallion, Murray is one of the organizers of her annual arts gala. In 2008, Fennell moved that the police board buy a $6,000 table for McCallion’s gala that November.

Murray rejected any suggestion that there was a quid pro quo between them, yelling “that’s just insulting.”

And “quid pro quo” means “this for that” or “I’ll scratch your back if you’ll scratch mine.”

[DIP TO WHITE]

And also when you know that Jim Murray has been organizing the Major’s galas going all the way back to 1991, Murray’s Gala —and I mean it’s fair to call it “Murray’s Gala” when he’s an organizer.

For example when you look at 2008, which is the Regis Philbin one. Here’s the 2008 Gala, “Let the Games Begin”. So in [sic] October 17th, 2008 you can see Jim Murray here , voted for his own Gala,

[CROSS-FADE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Also there’s another special request. Would someone like to move that for the Mississauga—

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Oh, I’ll move that. (laughs)

(general laughter)

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

All those in favour? Carried.

Item 112.

[NOTE: Mayor Fennell moved the purchase of one table of 10 tickets in the total amount of $6,000 to Hazel McCallion’s annual gala. Video confirms that Jim Murray, organizer of the McCallion’s gala voted in favour.]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

And this one in 2009.

[REVERSE CLOCK WIPE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Item number 20 then is an event from the Special Policy —uh the Special Fund area. Mr. Murray.

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Yes. Mr. [inaudible]

This year’s recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award for the City of Brampton at the Mayor’ annual gala for the community, and for the Brampton community is the past vice chair [inaudible] and two-time member of this Board over many many years, Mr. Webb.

Mr. Ron Webb, and I think it will be appropriate if this Board was to buy two tables to this event. Primarily for that reason but also to recognize that this might be a difficult year to sell some subscriptions to this event, and it’s a worthy event. It supports the community —it supports the [inaudible] of this award. I would move that we purchase two tables.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Is there a seconder? Okay. Any other questions? If not, all those in favour? Carried.

Item number 21.

[VIDEO REPLAY with magnification.]

[NOTE: Video confirms that Mayor Fennell voted in favour of purchasing two tables in the total amount of $8,000 to her own gala.]MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

And again in 2010.

[CROSS-FADE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Yes. Mr. Murray?

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Mr. Chairman, we initially have passed a resolution to support Mayor Fennell’s gala on February 20th with the caveat that we would come back should they find themselves in these tough economic times in difficulty in selling tickets —tables to this worthy fund-raising event.

Capping that off they are honouring Iggy and Didi Kaneff, who made an ongoing lifetime contribution to this community and to many charities, not the least of which is University of Toronto and Sheridan Campus. And the 25-year sponsorship to Community Living and Community Living fund-raising efforts.

And I would like to move that we buy a second table to support this event. I think we bought two tables to the Mississauga Mayor’s gala in [inaudible] and in this economic time, it’s time to step up.

I would move that we buy a second table.

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2010)

[inaudible] I declare a conflict because of all the money that goes to the community and it’s in my name so [rest largely inaudible.]

[Video shows that Mayor Fennell stands up and moves into corner and abstains from voting.]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Thank you. All those in favour? Carried.

[Video confirms purchase of one additional table in the amount of $4,000 in support of the 6th Annual Mayor Fennell Gala. (total $8,000)   Moved by J. Murray.] MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reporting March 13, 2011)

And in 2010, April, I believe, Jim Murray resigned from the Peel Police Services Board and was replaced by Laurie Williamson, who, interestingly enough, is also an organizer of the Mayor’s Galas. So I’m just wondering if that’s a qualification to be on the Police Board here in Peel.

Anyway —I don’t know.

[Music:“Don’t Crash the Ambulance” by Mark Knopfler] [IMAGES/VIDEO OF MAYOR’S GALAS with repeat-audio of Councillor Nando Iannicca speaking]

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

—But first is, I trust the donors are aware, were aware that when you gave a dollar only six or seven cents went to the entity. And I’m starting to think that they’re not because of how tax receipts were issued. But perhaps that will come back.

I wonder what rapprochement’s been done with the charities when they now know, and I didn’t know, —I don’t think a lot of people knew, that you had this grand fete with the City’s elites. And at the end of the day for every dollar that came in, eighty cents was consumed.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you.

[LOGO] [VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Hazel McCallion and son Peter, pose with Marilyn Monroe, Elvis and Lucy impersonators at 2002 "Long Live Rock and Roll" Mayor's Gala for the arts

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

This is a comment left at the Toronto Sun by a Peel Board trustee who was in the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network Policy and Working Group [cut-and-paste begins] Valerie Arnold-Judge Report Comment March 10th 2011, 3:12pm. After being a school board trustee with PDSB for 13 years where the school board trustees have been micro managed by the provincial government with their expenses. No galas or functions are allowed on their expense reports unless it pertains to children., I find it appalling that the municipal councillors in the GTA are not questioned as to how many galas, trips and tournaments that they attend without any concerns from the provincial governmentl regarding tax payers money….It is time that they are held accountable for their spending. [end cut-and-paste]

HAZEL MCCALLION’S MAYOR’S GALA SCANDAL “…without question what we’ve done is illegal under the Revenue Act of Canada.”

March 10th, 2011  

This Blog is a follow-up to our March 8, 2011 Blog, “Toronto Star, “Peel police board spent thousands on mayors’ galas” –complete with VIDEO

Next, please know that a March 10, 2011 article, “Victim cash didn’t buy gala tickets” announced an important correction regarding the Peel Police Services Board.

Reporter Pam Douglas wrote:

A Toronto newspaper has backtracked on a story it printed Monday that accused the Peel Police Services Board of using money intended for victims of crime for other purposes.

The local police board asked for a correction to the story, which was picked up by The News, and a “clarification” was published yesterday.

The board’s Special Fund is not taxpayer money, it is not “proceeds of crime” money, and it is not money intended for crime victims, said Fred Biro, executive director of the Peel Police Services Board.

It is money accumulated through the sale of property when police have been unable to track down the rightful owner. The vast majority of it comes from the auctioning of bicycles found and turned in to police, Biro said.

Next.

At Wednesday’s Mississauga Council meeting, Councillor Sue McFadden continued her investigation into Hazel McCallion’s Mayor’s Galas and then announced that she would be filing a complaint against the Mayor with the City’s new integrity commissioner. Later, Councillor Nando Iannicca made his views known regarding, in his words, “this grand fete for the City’s elites.” This is a must-see video that also includes a peek into the oh-so-grand “grand fete for the City’s elites.”

So here’s the video complete with transcript.

HAZEL MCCALLION’S MAYOR’S GALA SCANDAL “…you had this grand fete for the City’s elites.” (9:03 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Also there’s another special request. Would someone like to move that for the Mississauga—

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Oh, I’ll move that. (laughs)

(general laughter)

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

All those in favour? Carried.

Item 112.

[NOTE: Mayor Fennell moved the purchase of one table of 10 tickets in the total amount of $6,000 to Hazel McCallion’s annual gala. Video confirms that Jim Murray, organizer of the McCallion’s gala voted in favour.]

[DIP TO BLACK]

Councillor Sue McFadden (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

And I have two questions, if you wouldn’t mind. Question number 1, after reviewing the answers provided on February 24th, 2011 to the gala questions I asked on January the 19th, I’m submitting a series of follow-up questions for further clarification and detail. And I will give a copy to the Clerk and to the City Manager.

And question number 2, after enduring ongoing bullying and verbal abuse from another member of Council, namely the Mayor, to the point of being unable to effectively do my job as a member of  Council and be in public, I will be submitting a request to the integrity commissioner for an investigation under Rules, 10, 11, 12 and 18 in the Code of Conduct.

Thank you.

[DIP TO BLACK]
[Video: clip of Hazel McCallion’s Mayor’s Gala promotional video.]
[Repeat-audio: Peel Police Services Board meeting,
October 17, 2008]

[CUT]

Councillor Frank Dale, Acting Mayor (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Councillor Iannicca.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Well, I wanted to follow up on the previous concerns from Councillor McFadden with regards to items she raised. But more important, the information that’s come back from the Staff in regards to the Mayor’s Gala.

And I understand more is to come back.

I just want to be clear on what is coming back and the action we’re taking, that something that to be very candid, just from the media accounts, looks dreadfully appalling. And looks like a whole bunch of people feel cheated.

And so I want some clarity around the issues when they come back, I want it to be very clear, and I want to say it here at Council, that these are the list of concerns. And the one specifically that relates to us as Board of Directors of the Corporation.

But first is, I trust the donors are aware, were aware that when you gave a dollar only six or seven cents went to the entity. And I’m starting to think that they’re not because of how tax receipts were issued. But perhaps that will come back.

I wonder what rapprochement’s been done with the charities when they now know, and I didn’t know, —I don’t think a lot of people knew, that you had this grand fete with the City’s elites. And at the end of the day for every dollar that came in, eighty cents was consumed.

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

The donors would have been better off giving them half as much directly and some of the charities are saying exactly that.

So I hope that comes back.

I’m sure a lot of taxpayers feel cheated because if my math is correct, only from the accounts, some of the entities who wholeheartedly and graciously gave money would have got bigger business receipts and charity receipts than the charities got in actual money. I just have a fundamental problem with that.

But the more specific point that I have that relates solely to us and solely to me —I’ll speak to it myself as a member of this Council, in effect the Board of Directors.

My understanding is without question what we’ve done is illegal under the Revenue Act of Canada. I don’t believe you’re allowed to issue charitable receipts if you’re not a charity.

So what I, and a direct question to the City Manager, what I would like is some understanding around what we are doing about that. By “that” what I mean is this.

You know, if you’re in the business of collecting taxes, and you’re in the business of passing laws, you should respect laws. And you should respect other levels of governments’ taxation laws. It appears as though we haven’t.

And before —and this is a fundamental point I’m making, before Revenue Canada comes knocking on our door, and my door as a member of this Board of Directors, I hope we are reaching out to Revenue Canada and saying, “Here’s how we governed our affairs. And if we’ve done something wrong, can someone please tell us. And how do we make this right.”

Because it’s my understanding that Revenue Canada takes a wholly different approach with you when you’re forthcoming and saying perhaps we made a mistake —I don’t know.

But only from the accounts and some of the questions that have been asked, we seemed to have made a rather egregious mistake. And before they come knock on our door and pursue it —and I’m told that CRA makes a habit of pursuing these things as well they should, I’d rather be proactive and conciliatory and say if we’ve done something wrong —on behalf of, speaking for myself as someone who sits on this Board of Directors, because we’re ultimately accountable, I would hope that we’re in the process of reconciling that.

Mr. Chairman, that’s a direct question to the City Manager on that specific aspect of it. What are we doing, relative to the concerns that have been raised that may abridge upon the role of the CRA.

Councillor Frank Dale, Acting Mayor (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Madam City Manager, could [sic] you like to respond?

City Manager Janice Baker (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

I have not —I mean, again, you know, I have not gone back and reviewed that because nobody has made a formal complaint to me. I have been reading comments in the paper. I’ve seen the material that’s come back from the commissioner.

I would reiterate again that the City simply provided a service to the Gala. We were not decision-makers with respect to the format and content of the event —the hiring of the services or the entertainment with respect to the Gala.

If Council wishes me to go back and review that matter, I certainly can do that. But as of now I have received no formal complaint— [inaudible]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH whispering into camera (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

I filed Freedom of Information a couple of days ago.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Mr. Chairman, I don’t want to raise it as a complaint. I want to be very —I have a whole host of concerns. I’ve spoken. That’s not what—

I’m asking a very specific question as it relates to what we did, as I understand it, in the issuance of receipts for charitable purposes. And we had no right to do that. As I understand it. And how that might run afoul of what the CRA expects of us. If I should have no concerns in that regard, I have—

City Manager Janice Baker (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Well, I have not reviewed it and if Council wishes for me to review that matter, I can certainly do that.

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Thank you and that’s exactly —maybe to report back to us and say we’ve done nothing wrong relative —great!

But if we have, then yes, and we’re doing what is appropriate under the circumstances to make sure that we’re not in their bad books, so to speak. Because, as I say, I don’t want to be in the business of passing laws for a living and collecting taxes, then breaking the country’s laws. Because we’re the Board of Directors and it’s out Corporation that issued receipts.

I’m only asking on that one point. I want to be very, very clear. Because that is of great concern to me and I’m sure all taxpayers in Canada. So if the City Manager can come back and just clarify that point and do whatever needs to be done in a remedial way, I don’t think, just in terms of the integrity of the Office of this Corporation, we don’t want to be seen as being afoul of Canada Revenue’s laws.

So yeah, I would appreciate that specific point coming back, thank you.

Councillor Frank Dale, Acting Mayor (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Take that as direction?

Councillor Nando Iannicca (Mississauga Council meeting, March 9, 2011)

Please. Thank you.

[IMAGES OF MAYOR’S GALAS with repeat-audio of Councillor Nando Iannicca speaking]
[Music:“Don’t Crash the Ambulance” by Mark Knopfler]

[DIP TO WHITE]

Mississauga Mayor’s Gala Promotional Video shown at the $350.00-a-ticket Hazel McCallion 90th Birthday Celebration Chair (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

Now in its 25th year, raised millions of dollars to support that arts, culture and heritage of the community—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

Because saying it makes it so.

Mississauga Mayor’s Gala Promotional Video shown at the $350.00-a-ticket Hazel McCallion 90th Birthday Celebration Chair (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

—North America’s best performers—

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

The following images are from the Mayor’s Gala’s website at: http://themayorsgala.ca/

2008 Mayor's Gala - Let the Games Begin Entertainment: Regis Philbin

Regis

2008 Gala performer Regis Philbin delights the audience with a stroll through Hammerson Hall.

The Organizing Committee 2010

Committee_2010

Pictured is the 2010 committee
Back Row: (L to R) Duncan Hobbs, Dave O’Brien, Ron Duquette, Douglas Fowles, Martin Stitt
Middle Row: Nance MacDonald, Joe Watson, Hanne Olesen-Nahman, Frank Giannone
Front Row: Jim Murray, Neena Kanwar, Frankie Valli, Mayor Hazel McCallion, Jake Dheer
Photo by: Amy Tjen  Photo Depot

This is a comment left at the Toronto Sun by a Peel Board trustee who was in the Peel Youth Violence Prevention Network Policy and Working Group

[cut-and-paste begins] Valerie Arnold-Judge Report Comment March 10th 2011, 3:12pm. After being a school board trustee with PDSB for 13 years where the school board trustees have been micro managed by the provincial government with their expenses. No galas or functions are allowed on their expense reports unless it pertains to children., I find it appalling that the municipal councillors in the GTA are not questioned as to how many galas, trips and tournaments that they attend without any concerns from the provincial governmentl regarding tax payers money….It is time that they are held accountable for their spending. [end cut-and-paste]

Toronto Star, “Peel police board spent thousands on mayors’ galas” –complete with VIDEO

March 8th, 2011  

This Blog is meant to be a companion piece to the Toronto Star’s March 6, 2011 editorial, “McCallion’s Arts Gala: No feast for the arts” as well as Torstar’s San Grewal’s March 7, 2011 article, “Peel police board spent thousands on mayors’ galas”.

What’s rather interesting is just at the time when I was ferreting through Peel Police Services Board minutes for items regarding both Hazel McCallion and Susan Fennell’s Mayor’s galas table purchases, so did San Grewal!

Grewal writes:

Minutes show, for example, that the board approved buying a $4,000 table at Fennell’s gala on Feb. 20 last year, on Fennell’s invitation. A month before the gala took place, then-board member Jim Murray put forward a motion to buy a second table. It was approved.

A big player in Mississauga’s real estate market and close friend of McCallion, Murray is one of the organizers of her annual arts gala. In 2008, Fennell moved that the police board buy a $6,000 table for McCallion’s gala that November.

Murray rejected any suggestion that there was a quid pro quo between them, yelling “that’s just insulting.”

Ohhh there was quid pro quo (“this for that”) all right! And I found it most insulting that Mr. Murray, former Vice Chair of the Peel Police Services Board would yell “that’s just insulting.” And I believe that video will bear me out.

I managed to find only three videos of the Peel Police Services Board approving the purchase of tables for Mayors’ galas. But these clips are definitely revealing —especially the role played by Vice Chair, Jim “big player in Mississauga’s real estate market and close friend of McCallion” Murray.

Video shows Vice Chair Murray (and organizer of Hazel McCallion’s Mayor galas) urging that in these “tough economic times” that the Police Services Board “step up to the plate” to wine and dine on The Fine —giving zero thought to those unfortunate enough to be on the receiving end of these “tough economic times”!

As always, here’s the video, followed by the transcript.

Toronto Star: “Peel police board spent thousands on mayors’ galas” –and the videos (5:52 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (reading from the Toronto Star editorial, “McCallion’s Arts Gala: No feast for the arts”, March 8, 2011)

This is part of the editorial, and it says:

“McCallion’s Arts Gala: No feast for the arts

Anyone still harbouring the illusion that Mississauga has been well run under Mayor Hazel McCallion need only look to the mayor’s annual arts gala for fresh evidence to the contrary.

Although the gala is not a registered charity, the city made charitable receipts available to those who attended. Only a small fraction of “arts gala” revenues between 1997 and 2007 went directly to arts groups. Peel Police and other public agencies spent taxpayer dollars on tickets to support what was little more than a black-tie fete for the elite.”

And then the Toronto Star says:

“Councillor Sue McFadden deserves credit for persistently questioning the event’s propriety. As his next order of business, Mississauga integrity commissioner George Rust-D’Eye would do well to examine the ethical two-step at the heart of this soiree.”

And I guess with all of that background, I have to say that when I was videotaping and the Peel Police Services Board was approving the purchase of tables at galas —both for Fennell’s gala and also for McCallion’s, it went over my head. I didn’t think anything of it.

And of course that’s one of the fantastic things about videotape, is that once the Toronto Star and the Brampton Guardian called Fennell’s gala into question —well, then I could go back to the video that I had.

And the same thing once the Toronto Star started questioning McCallion’s November arts gala —I had the videotape!

And well, now it’s for you to see.

[REVERSE CLOCK WIPE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Item 110, then is the Special Fund Request —Brampton Safe City Award Gala.

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

I’ll move that.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Okay. Do we have a seconder? Yes, Mr. Murray.

Are there any questions? All those in favour? Carried.

Also there’s another special request. Would someone like to move that for the Mississauga—

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

Oh, I’ll move that. (laughs)

(general laughter)

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, October 17, 2008)

All those in favour? Carried.

Item 112.

[NOTE: Mayor Fennell moved the purchase of one table of 10 tickets in the total amount of $6,000 to Hazel McCallion’s annual gala. Video confirms that Jim Murray, organizer of the McCallion’s gala voted in favour.]

[CLOCK WIPE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

All those in favour? Opposed anyone? Carried.

Item number 20 then is an event from the Special Policy —uh the Special Fund area. Mr. Murray.

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Yes. Mr. [inaudible]

This year’s recipient of this year’s Lifetime Achievement Award for the City of Brampton at the Mayor’ annual gala for the community, and for the Brampton community is the past vice chair [inaudible] and two-time member of this Board over many many years, Mr. Webb.

Mr. Ron Webb, and I think it will be appropriate if this Board was to buy two tables to this event. Primarily for that reason but also to recognize that this might be a difficult year to sell some subscriptions to this event, and it’s a worthy event. It supports the community —it supports the [inaudible] of this award. I would move that we purchase two tables.

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2009)

Is there a seconder? Okay. Any other questions? If not, all those in favour? Carried.

Item number 21.

[VIDEO REPLAY with magnification.]
[NOTE: Video confirms that Mayor Fennell voted in favour of purchasing two tables in the total amount of $8,000 to her own gala.]

[CLOCK WIPE]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Yes. Mr. Murray?

Jim Murray, Vice Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Mr. Chairman, we initially have passed a resolution to support Mayor Fennell’s gala on February 20th with the caveat that we would come back should they find themselves in these tough economic times in difficulty in selling tickets —tables to this worthy fund-raising event.

Capping that off they are honouring Iggy and Didi Kaneff, who made an ongoing lifetime contribution to this community and to many charities, not the least of which is University of Toronto and Sheridan Campus. And the 25-year sponsorship to Community Living and Community Living fund-raising efforts.

And I would like to move that we buy a second table to support this event. I think we bought two tables to the Mississauga Mayor’s gala in [inaudible] and in this economic time, it’s time to step up.

I would move that we buy a second table.

Brampton Mayor Susan Fennell (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 23, 2010)

[inaudible] I declare a conflict because of all the money that goes to the community and it’s in my name so [rest largely inaudible.]

[Video shows that Mayor Fennell stands up and moves into corner and abstains from voting.]

Emil Kolb, Chair (Peel Police Services Board meeting, January 22, 2010)

Thank you. All those in favour? Carried.

[Video confirms purchase of one additional table in the amount of $4,000 in support of the 6th Annual Mayor Fennell Gala. (total $8,000)   Moved by J. Murray.]

[CLOCK WIPE]

Mississauga Mayor’s Gala Promotional Video shown at the $350.00-a-ticket Hazel McCallion 90th Birthday Celebration Chair (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

Now in its 25th year, raised millions of dollars to support that arts, culture and heritage of the community—

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

Because saying it makes it so.

Mississauga Mayor’s Gala Promotional Video shown at the $350.00-a-ticket Hazel McCallion 90th Birthday Celebration Chair (Mississauga Convention Centre, February 12, 2011)

—North America’s best performers—

[LOGO]
[Music:“Don’t Crash the Ambulance” by Mark Knopfler]
[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

ONTARIO MUNICIPALITIES: A MAJOR (unexplored) ROOT OF YOUTH VIOLENCE

Peel Police Services Board  October 17, 2008: Item 111. Special Fund Request – The Board purchased one table of 10 tickets  in the total amount of $6,000 for the 22nd Annual Mississauga Mayor’s Gala. Moved by S. Fennell.

Peel Police Services Board January 23, 2009: Item 20. Special Fund – That the Board purchase from the Special Fund  two tables of eight to Mayor Susan Fennell’s Annual Gala, in the total  amount of $8,000. Moved by J. Murray. Mayor Fennell voted in favour.

Peel Police Services Board January 22, 2010: Police Services Board – Special Fund – 6th Annual Mayor Susan Fennell Gala – The Board considered a motion from Mr. J. Murray to purchase one  additional table in the amount of $4,000 in support of the 6th Annual Mayor  Fennell Gala. (total $8,000)   Moved by J. Murray.

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT

April 2nd, 2010  

Here, as promised, is video of the 2009 Hate/Bias motivated Crime report presented at the Peel Police Services Board meeting on March 26, 2010.

And as usual, the video transcript.

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT10:31 min

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD presents 2009 HATE/ BIAS MOTIVATED CRIMES (and GRAFFITI) REPORT 10:31 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE CHIEF, MICHAEL METCALF:

Mr. Chairman, [inaudible] in charge of our Diversity Unit, so without any further introduction, Chris, welcome. Thank you.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB:

It’s item #27. Now would you like to make some comments on the report, sir?

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE DIVERSITY RELATIONS UNIT:

Yes, Mr. Chairman. Good morning.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB:

Good morning.

PEEL REGIONAL POLICE DIVERSITY RELATIONS UNIT:

I’d just like to take the time to present the details contained within the 2009 Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report.

The Hate/Bias Motivated Crimes are monitored and reviewed by the Diversity Relations Unit. From those occurrences, the Unit has prepared this report for you.

In 2009, there were 95 Hate/Bias Motivated Crimes reported and investigated by Peel Regional Police. This is a significant increase from the 2008 numbers when there were 37 reported crimes.

When the Diversity Relations Unit reviewed the occurrences and analyzed the evidence, it is worth noting that in more than half the occurrences, the victim had no idea why there were the target of the specific Hate-motivated crime.

Their ethnicity, religion, race or sexual persuasion did not coincide with the Hate-motivated crime. During 2009, five investigations resulted in arrests and the occurrence being solved.

The report contains diagrams and graphs to assist in evaluating the information.

The first diagram, located on page 2 of the report identifies the fact that most of the occurrences —66 to be exact, are Mischiefs or damaged property occurrences such as graffiti. This has been consistent over the past four years.

The Hate-motivated crimes are not isolated to specific areas within the region but fairly evenly distributed throughout all of the divisions.

The Diversity Relations Unit have [sic] tracked Hate-motivated crimes since 2006. The occurrences have fluctuated during those four years with 71 occurrences in 2006, 47 in 2007, 37 in 2008 and then for last year we had 95.

Explanations and reasons for the increase have been researched and the occurrences will continue to be closely scrutinized to ensure that they are investigated in great detail.

But we believe that some of the increase can be attributed to the proactive efforts of the Police Service within our diverse community that we serve. The Diversity Relations Unit educates every front line officer on the recognizing and investigating Hate-motivated crime.

They also educate ethnic community agencies —groups on the importance of reporting such crimes.

As we hire officers that reflect the community we believe that it enhances our ability to detect Hate-motivated crime better.

The Diversity Relations Unit is building strong relationships and trust within our communities through events such as The Race Against Racism, the Diversity Basketball Tournament and our participation in the Pride Parade each year.

We have also introduced a Lesbian/Gay hotline to encourage our Gay Community [to] report crime directed at them. Just this year we’ve enhanced that service by adding an email address that the gay community can use to report incidents or seek help from the Diversity Relations Unit or the Police Service.

The Diversity Relations Unit also participates in community programs speaking to newcomers that come to Canada. They distribute material in a variety of different languages and again ensuring that our new residents understand that they can trust policing in Canada.

And that summarizes the contents of the report.

[TRANSCRIPT ENDS WITH THANKS TO PEEL POLICE]

And ah, what the heck. Might as well serve this one up.

You know… Just me documenting “What happens if nothing happens?”

WARNING! HIGHLY OFFENSIVE VIDEO! Dedicated to Safe City Mississauga.

Video: GRAFFITI TRUTH: “BURN THAT F***ER TO THE GROUND IF THEY DON’T LOVE YOU LIKE THEY SHOULD” 5:24 min

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

GRAFFITI  "MISSISSAUGA CIVIC CENTRE" "HATE/BIAS GRAFFITI  (photographed March 24, 2010)

MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) Off the Cuff Hate Crime/Gang REPORT PART 2

April 2nd, 2010  

This time Part 2  —the transcript of this video report —uploaded to YouTube just prior to the Hate Crime/graffiti data released by the Peel Police Services Board at their Friday, March 26, 2010 meeting.

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA "HATE CRIME" "JULY 29" 2009 "ERIN MILLS PARKWAY" "WHITE POWER" "NIGGER" PERMISSION WALL"

Rather than repeat the introduction, please click here if you’re interested in viewing/reading Part 1 MISSISSAUGA/BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT conclusion: Studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture first.

Otherwise, we begin Brampton/Mississauga graffiti Part 2 video and transcript.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

NOTE: When I uploaded Part 2 to YouTube on March 25th, I referred to it as a DRAFT and said that I’d replace it at a later date with a more-worked version. I’ve since changed my mind. Viewing this a week later, I realize that it’s important to show “works in progress” –even as rough, rushed and off-the-cuff as this one was.

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:31 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (parked directly in front of the City of Mississauga Big Yellow evil empire, March 25, 2010):

Just to speak a little bit further on the lack of overlap between what the July and August 2009 Peel Regional Police graffiti photographs showed and mine —that was a surprise. I had actually figured that I would recognize more tags than I did.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing is, in my own driving and looking around, the tags that I documented, while they might still be there —they’re the original tags that I documented a year ago. And I often don’t see new ones by the same individual.

And I’m not quite sure how to interpret that.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Peel Police has [sic] suggested that catching graffiti [sic] is very difficult to do —and catching people in the act. That’s not a surprise.

So the question is, do the kids just naturally grow out of it in the sense that they’ve tagged maybe for a few months and then just grown out of that, or whether they’ve been caught, whether they’ve been talked out of it by buddies —I don’t know. But it doesn’t seem to be something that for a lot of them they don’t do for any length of time.

[DIP TO WHITE]

For graffiti people who might be out there watching this and offended, I have to admit that I haven’t been at the Mississauga Graffiti Wall. I’m aware that it exists. I just have difficulty getting access to it. But it appears to run —I’ve checked Google Maps and it runs along Streetsville. And I have seen the graffiti there and there’s a lot of beautiful stuff there. I’m talking about the artwork because it is Art —it’s just unauthorized Art and therefore it’s a crime, but—

It may be a crime, but it’s still Art.

In the case of somebody spraying “FTP” on a post, don’t convince me that’s art —that’s just tagging.

[DIP TO WHITE]

One thing just looking at the occurrence reports and the quality of the occurrence reports, who’s ever writing them, the descriptions are excellent. The best occurrence reports also explain what the graffiti represents. And I’m satisfied myself, that I’m beginning to recognize gang-related graffiti versus just a bunch of boys [sic] who are out on a lark.

[DIP TO WHITE]

However at the same time just because somebody’s putting up gang graffiti doesn’t make them gang members either. It just means that they know the gang symbols —as do I.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There was the underpass, clearly permission wall underpass and it had been sprayed with —I know one of the words was “White Power”. I can’t remember if there was the word “N*****” in there. I seem to remember that to be the case, which again would it clearly make it a Hate Crime.

But what was interesting is, I remember, oh, about a year ago, maybe more, Councillor Katie Mahoney saying, oh, we put up these permission walls and when we do, other graffiti artists respect this art and won’t draw over it.

Wronnnnnnnnnnnng! They draw over it.

And the best example to show that taggers will draw over other graffiti artists is just to go to the [points to Mississauga City Hall] skateboard plaza in there.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Some of the permission walls constantly attract taggers. There’s only one that doesn’t and it was done by a respected, well-known graffiti artist. And it seems to be that, yes, that stuff is not touched because people recognize it as a true graffiti artist.

The other stuff? Pfffft.

[DIP TO WHITE]

I have to say that at this time last year, I don’t think there was as much graffiti around as there is now. I think it’s on the increase. However, at the same time I also know that I’m a much much better at spotting it.

So, and Peel Police also suggest that maybe there isn’t as much —that the increase that they see might not be so much an increase in graffiti, as an increase in reporting.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There’s a lot of question marks, here. You see I’m kind of struggling with what the graffiti says.

But there’s absolutely no doubt that if you are not —I’m talking about now people who want to understand youth and trends of youth. I’m not talking about the kind of youth that feel comfortable walking into building.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The youth that I’m interested in and the most at-risk aren’t going to be writing as much. They’re more likely going to be expressing themselves on YouTube.

Again. It’s just a hypothesis right now.

And I think in the case of video, YouTube is richer for the [sic] kind of research because sometimes you see incidental things. In the case of one video, I was, I won’t say what the subject was but somebody was

[DIP TO WHITE]

driving down Highway 10. And you could see out the window, as they were videotaping out the car, there was a Mississauga Transit bus. And also a City of Mississauga Transit Enforcement vehicle. I don’t know if it was the 301 or 302 car but there are these little snippets that you get and then you can email the videographer and say, hey, can you tell me something about that incident.

Or, hey, I noticed some interesting graffiti you’ve got in your video. Can you tell me the location.

And you know, at first they don’t want to tell you. But then when they start looking at your stuff and they realize that yeah, you’re really interested in researching and what they have to say, they do share it.

[DIP TO WHITE]

When they really know that you’re not reporting the location, you get, I get emails —really terrific insights into graffiti and the tagging culture. And it is a culture.  It’s a —yes, it’s a sub-culture.

But when you think about these people [points to Mississauga City Hall], these people look down on —not just look down on, they look at taggers and graffiti artists and the “bad youth” with the most, with the most contempt.

And [points to Mississauga City Hall], these people view themselves as “decent folk” where the tagger is essentially an animal.

[DIP TO WHITE]

What was really interesting was to be going through and reading each of the [Peel Police] documents and I matched the photographs up with the occurrence reports and then I flipped the page and I saw big black spray paint on yellow brick and I knew immediately that it was [points to Mississauga City Hall] City Hall.

And as I looked at the other pictures, sure enough, somebody, and I don’t know the date, about late July, “bombed” City Hall!

And it looked like they started at the skate plaza, went around the front, did the pillars —I don’t know what those watchtowers are at both ends—

[DIP TO WHITE]

But I want to make it clear I will never report a location of graffiti and tagging. Because when you’re researching if you report, what happens then, it becomes erased. And because of that, you have changed something in what you’re researching.

And one of the things I’m researching is how long some of these graffitis [sic] —graffiti meaning paintings or drawings, or tags, stay up!

If it’s on public property, Public Works, I will tell you this, Public Works gets rid of stuff really fast. A lot of the stuff on private property stays up a lot longer.

[DIP TO WHITE]

Peel Regional Police and Peel Council say how much they try to work with the community. I had been at the Lincoln Alexander School lock-down, had an opportunity to talk to Malton residents and they spoke very highly of Peel Regional Police. Every last one, including a Honda Civic, you know, with the dark tinted glass coming in with three youth in it.

And you’re kind of thinking, oh oh, [laughs] this is going to be a drive-by shooting. No, they rolled down the window and they asked what was going on and those guys in there with the hats this way [turns cap sideways] they supported Peel Regional Police too.

[DIP TO WHITE]

What I’m trying to do is anything that I remember I want to record right now because I’m really interested in how much of it, of my observations, matches Peel Regional Police. And wouldn’t it be interesting if it’s different? Because it really shouldn’t be. If —there might be different stuff that Peel Police record, but the ratio of the Hate Crimes and “FTP”s [F*** the Police] and this kind of thing, the ratio should be the same as my photographs.

Should be. Well, we’ll see.

[DIP TO WHITE]

[PART 2 VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL "BOMBED" (MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL MATERIAL courtesy Peel Regional Police through Freedom of Information)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" Pic 2 MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL "BOMBED" (MISSISSAUGA CITY HALL MATERIAL courtesy Peel Regional Police through Freedom of Information)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA, "S BLOCK" "S-BLOCK" (undisclosed location) photographed March 30, 2010

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

MISSISSAUGA/BRAMPTON GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT conclusion: Studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture

April 2nd, 2010  

—As promised —the transcript of this video —uploaded to YouTube just prior to the Hate Crime/graffiti data released by the Peel Police Services Board at their Friday, March 26, 2010 meeting.

Advisory: I research graffiti/tags and do not report any locations no matter how offensive (even racist) it is. After all, if I am documenting such observations as how long something stays up, I can’t be the one reporting it! Having begun my research into graffiti on April 19, 2009, I can now confidently say that studying graffiti/tags is an important window into youth culture. Graffiti and especially the tags, give marginalized/alienated youth a voice they simply don’t have anywhere else.

These youth never showed at Mississauga Youth Plan meetings. Never showed for Peel Youth Violence Prevention meetings.

These youth NEVER show. Because they KNOW.

Like I do.

Want to prep you for the graffiti stuff with a quote from Peel Regional Chair Emil Kolb, February 28, 2008.

“I had a young gentleman in to see me yesterday that was here to convince me that we need to get away from the word, ‘multi-culture’ and we need to get to the word of ‘integration’. If we don’t get to the word of integration —how these communities are going to integrate, that, maybe not in our time here soon, but maybe in his children’s time, they’ll be a big issue in this Region.”

To me, that’s the most important thing Chair Kolb ever said in the four years that I’ve been researching municipal governance.

PEEL REGIONAL CHAIR, EMIL KOLB, MULTICULTURALISM vs INTEGRATION, YOUTH GANGS, RACISM

OK, enough background.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THIS VIDEO IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:09 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min

[VIDEO TRANSCRIPT]

MISSISSAUGAWATCH (parked directly in front of the City of Mississauga Big Yellow evil empire, March 25, 2010):

March 25th, 2010 and all I care about is that I get this report up on YouTube today and before tomorrow’s Peel Police Services Board meeting.

I read in the Toronto Sun that Peel Regional Police were going to be tabling their annual Hate Crime statistics.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And there was mention that quite a bit of the material that would be presented was in the form of graffiti.

So I’m absolutely intrigued and I want to record my own findings and study so far on graffiti and I thought what better place to do it than right here in front of Big Yellow evil empire City of Mississauga city hall. Because, see right there? Freedom of Information, direct observation, videotape, observing the Mississauga Youth Plan, Peel Youth Violence Prevention —all manner of emails and documents going back and forth, that, right there is a MAJOR Root of Youth Violence.

So I thought no better place than right here with that in the background.

[DIP TO WHITE]

OK, first of all the Mississsauga Youth Plan. I had been observing it including four meetings, ostensibly called “youth input” meetings.

Let’s put it this way. The youth that really needed a voice, not only weren’t represented, they wouldn’t have even been welcome there!

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I realize that the youth who were most at-risk, the ones who got in trouble with police and that I would see at Brampton Court House  —they’re not going to these meetings.

And I thought, well, how do I even go about finding them? And I managed to do that through YouTube. And it became very clear that if you want to know what youth are thinking (laughs) you don’t invite them to the Mississauga library!

The youth that I’m primarily interested in, the target group, the most at-risk, have already pushed these people aside and recognized them for what they are. Frauds.

[DIP TO WHITE]

But how do you gain access to them? To be able to see what it is that they’re thinking and what it is they’re saying because, for the most part, they’re not interested in talking to people like me. I’m 60 years old for example. They just— and a lot of them don’t even trust you or think that you’re legitimately interested in them. And, by the way, I don’t blame them.

And they certainly have a hatred —an absolute hatred, for institutions. And may I also say that I don’t blame them for that either.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So in March 2009, I watched a lot of true youth voice videos on YouTube. And it became obvious that graffiti was a big thing in those kids’ lives. So by April I was already deciding that I was going to start documenting graffiti here in Peel Region.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing I want to say is even though I’m a resident of Mississauga, I think Peel Region. And in fact, the fact that I’m wearing this hat today is symbolic of that. I’m a Peeler. I think in terms —I love the City of Brampton. I love Brampton kids. Those are the kids I taught for most of my career. So there’s this strong feeling of community within me and pride for Peel.

So it wasn’t just a case of me documenting City of Mississauga graffiti, I also wanted to know what was happening in Brampton. And I began my first photographic foray on April 19, 2009.

[DIP TO WHITE]

And I did not report any of the graffiti. While I put these samples up on my Flickr site, I did my best to try to hide the locations. And I can say that even now, that some of these graffiti and tags are still up.

[DIP TO WHITE]

There are some really-truly graffiti artists. And I mean like ART. It’s zero question, it’s ART.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing is, in July and August I also expanded my graffiti research to the Hawaiian Island of Maui. And also expanded my research to include skateboarding culture and to compare —and I also researched skateboarding, to compare the urban-style skateboarding that we have here in Brampton slash Mississauga versus the west coast style of skateboarding that you’d see in California and definitely on Maui.

Very very interesting and I also speculated that there would be a difference in the graffiti between the urban here Mississauga one and west coast, Hawaiian Island kind of graffiti as well.

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that I did, is in July and August, what with me researching Hawaiian or Maui-based graffiti, it meant that there was a two-month window that I didn’t have graffiti here in July and August. So what I did just recently, is I filed Freedom of Information with Peel Police requesting their graffiti information for the months of July and August.

And I can’t thank Peel Regional Police enough for two reasons. For one thing the amount of material that they gave back both in terms of print-outs, colour print-outs and also one DVD cost —was roughly $44.00. And they waived the fee. I’m grateful.

But the other thing is, by reading their —Peel Regional Police’s occurrence reports and the quality of their observations and the insights there, that did two things. I learned a lot from what Peel Regional Police is looking for in terms of its own graffiti research. And to realize that they are applying Science to the study of graffiti. As am I, by the way.

[DIP TO WHITE]

One thing that I found with the graffiti here, is I agree too that a lot of the graffiti is —of the Hate ones, and there isn’t as much as you might think. Which in some ways is good.

But yeah, you see the swastikas. You see the White Power. You see N***** and niggaz.

However, I’ve also documented graffiti which shows sort of the Chinese —the target Chinese community, with the Chinese hat and the moustache, with “Chinaman” down there. Or drawings of the turban. And then —I mean really offensive stuff!

The other thing I was looking for was the relationship that these youth who do graffiti have with Police. Because I felt the relationship between youth and Police would be reflected in the graffiti.

And I admit that there’s some “F*** the Police” and “FTP” which is short for “F*** the Police”. And Peel Regional Police, in their July and August 2009 data also showed some evidence of that.

But what was neat was, it’s still quite rare.

And when you go, for example, to the City of Hamilton, which is one of my alternate study sites —comparative sites, “F*** the Police” is one of the most common pieces of graffiti. As is “FTP”. And I’m talking about every pole. Along every area— even in the parks.

And I’m talking about Beasley Park where “F*** the Police” is about this high in big black letters and has been there since I started back in April.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So there’s a really huge difference in the relationship, I believe —at least that’s what I think it suggests between the youth in the City of Hamilton and the Police, as opposed to what we see here in Peel and the relationship with Police.

Sure there’s the odd tag but it isn’t nearly as prevalent and as obvious as City of Hamilton.

And so one of the questions you ask is well, what’s the message there?

[DIP TO WHITE]

The other thing that is interesting is, when I looked at the photographs that Peel Regional Police had for July and August, there was very little overlap between what they documented and what I did.

And the other thing really interesting is, Peel Regional Police —their July/August stuff, a lot of it was parks. And a surprising amount was City of Mississauga sites and parks. And City of Mississauga Corporate Security being the ones filing the reports on graffiti.

[DIP TO WHITE]

That’s not a surprise because I avoid City of Mississauga property because (whispers) I know about these security guards.

[DIP TO WHITE]

So I always have a— I have to have a [sic] audio recorder to even feel remotely-safe on City property. So I try to avoid that and my analysis is more along the roadways and just driving along the roads and pulling aside when I see something.

[PART 1 VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS]

Signed,

MISSISSAUGAWATCH

Peel Police Services Board “Hate Crime/Graffiti” Report (March 26, 2010) –and how it matches MISSISSAUGAWATCH graffiti (preliminary) findings

March 27th, 2010  

UPDATE: Saturday, March 27, 2010

Just want to provide a quick update on the “Peel Regional Police – 2009 Annual Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report -Memo dated March 11, 2010 that was presented at yesterday’s Peel Police Services Board meeting. First, I need to make this quick because I’d rather work up the actual video of the Hate/Crime Bias presentation. That’s what the next Blog entry will be about.

Just quickly, the observations and comments I made in the two videos I’d posted onto YouTube prior to the Police Services Board meeting turned out to be accurate.

Just last week, I got Freedom of Information results back from Peel Police. I’d requested any data on graffiti incidents for July and August 2009. As I said in my March 25th videos, viewing the Peel Police graffiti samples came as a surprise —that while I did recognize some tags, there was surprisingly little overlap in the graffiti that Peel Police had documented those two months and the kind that I’ve been researching!

I’ve said this before and will repeat it here. What I love about a Peel Police report is the rich DATA. It is PERCENTAGES, GRAPHS, TRENDS. It is ANALYSIS. Bottomline it’s SCIENCE. “SCIENCE.” meaning, that I can replicate Peel Police findings. I should be able to confirm the accuracy/validity of their percentages, graphs and analysis just by walking in their footsteps. This I will do to fill in the gap in my own research —the gap of July/August 2009. So on Monday I will file Freedom of Information on Peel Police’s 2009 Hate/Bias graffiti-material.

Just want to say that several things stuck out in the 2009 Annual Hate/Bias Motivated Crime Report. I’ll simply list them because as I said, I’m poised to do a more detailed Blog this weekend.

Something else. Man, it’s a good thing that portions of the report and the graffiti that Peel Police provided through Freedom of Information didn’t jive with what I was seeing. I went back to the July/August incident reports and realized that I’d only received City of Mississauga graffiti and none from Brampton. Of course I know why. I didn’t ask! While the Peel Police report mentions that the 95 Hate/Bias incidents were fairly evenly distributed throughout Peel, I find City of Brampton graffiti “different” from that of City of Mississauga and I’m wondering if Peel Police notice that too. And what it means!

Anyway…

Let me show you Hate/Bias graffiti that I photographed again yesterday right after the Peel Police Services Board meeting. City of Brampton —swastikas, as well as “gay” references at this site.

First photographed December 9, 2009 (above) —and after the Peel Police Services Board meeting (below). Given how many other Hate/Bias graffiti that I’ve photographed/videotaped back in April/May 2009 that were still up there in the Fall 2009, Hate/Bias graffiti is tolerated by Peel residents! After all, the majority goes unreported. I mean what else can you conclude?

CITY OF BRAMPTON SWASTIKAS GRAFFITI (COMPARATIVE first photographed December 9, 2009 and March 26, 2010) GRAFFITI, HATE CRIME, FASCIST SYMBOLS, NAZI

It was a beautiful day and after confirming the continued existence of graffiti at our Brampton study sites, we headed for Toronto and photographed “JESUS LOVES YOU” graffiti.

Clearly a message of Love.

Or is it?….

GRAFFITI TORONTO "JESUS LOVES YOU" photographed March 26, 2010

Next.

Regarding the two graffiti video reports that I posted to YouTube prior to the Peel Police Services Board meeting (below). I know I’d said that I would provide transcripts of both so that we-all can see how closely my preliminary findings matched Peel Police. Sorry. I don’t have that luxury of time. At least not for the next while.

Today I MUST file another video report. Likely two-three hours long, believe it or not. A kind of mega-debriefing session of sorts. And rather than being a “talking-head”, I’m driving around Brampton and Mississauga, the audio is me talking (testifying, actually) while the video portion will document the “habitat” of the “creatures” that I’m studying.

That’s it.

WHAT FOLLOWS IS A REPEAT OF YESTERDAY’S BLOG FYI

Needed to post this prior to tomorrow’s Peel Police Services Board meeting and their Hate Crime/Graffiti Report.

WARNING! DO NOT VIEW THESE VIDEOS IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY THE F-WORD AND EVEN WORSE WORDS!

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:09 min
uploaded March 25, 2010

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Video: MISSISSAUGA BRAMPTON PEEL GRAFFITI RESEARCH (preliminary) REPORT PART 2 (MISSISSAUGAWATCH) 10:32 min
NOTE: I caught a break. YouTube records Part 2 uploaded on March 25, 2010 even though it’s 1:24 am March 26, 2010 Mississauga time.

Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube

Also offering Flickr graffiti pics at:

GRAFFITI RESEARCH (Brampton, Hamilton, Mississauga, (and for comparative purposes, Maui, Hawaii)

GRAFFITI MISSISSAUGA STREETSVILLE  GUN DETAIL 090501

Safe City Mississauga/Mississauga Crime Prevention Association: Inventing Successes since ?…

January 31st, 2010  

[This is a follow-up to our January 28th Blog  “Mississauga Council deputation: MISSISSAUGAWATCH *OPPOSES* $199,627 Corporate Grant (upped to $318,075.00) for Safe City Mississauga to “celebrate” (invent) their Successes.”]

On Wednesday, January 27, 2010, I went before Mississauga Council to oppose Safe City Mississauga receiving a Corporate Grant of $199,627. Even before I had my chance to get “up there”, Mississauga Council actually rubber-stamped approval of upping the amount of taxpayers’ money to $318,075.00.

And it’s worse than that.

I’d drafted my deputation script so that the 1994 Peel Police Services Board recommendation that “A process of accountability and evaluation should be built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness” was repeated eight times in 12 minutes 52 seconds in the hopes that Mississauga Council would Get It.

Fact is, I suspect Mayor and Councillors Got It  —just Avoided It.

Here’s the exchange featuring Mississauga Councillor George Carlson commenting on a Safe City Mississauga that he’s never filed Freedom of Information on. And note, I did not suggest hiring police officers to drive around the roads but rather youth-friendly youth-expert Peel Police youth-advocates. Huge diff.

Video: “SAFE CITY MISSISSAUGA LACKS “A process of accountability and evaluation” says MISSISSAUGAWATCH (4:01 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip on YouTube)

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT BEGINS

MISSISSAUGAWATCH:

“A process of accountability should be built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost effectiveness.” –Peel Police Services Board 1994.

There’s one other quote I need to share in closing and I found it visionary.

The words of Larry Zacher, Safe City Brampton, at the October 25, 2007 Peel Regional Council meeting. (This is a video freeze-frame.)

He said:

“The absolute best thing we can do in the community is to provide seamless care for our children from the day they’re born til the time they become responsible adults.”

“seamless care” That’s Perfection!

And I hate to end on a Negative but Freedom of Information confirms that “seamless care” is no more out the starting gate than a “process of accountability and evaluation built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness”.

And in my opinion that is the tragic gap and I submit that it’s also a contributing Root of Youth Violence. I don’t have any answers. It’s kind of a moot presentation right now¹ But I’m just satisfied that I got it into the records today.

Thank you, Council.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH (Acting Chair):

Would you stay in place Ursula, we may have some questions. Councillor Carlson.

COUNCILLOR GEORGE CARLSON:

More of a comment, Madam Chair and I appreciate Ursula taking the time today to do the math for us and of course it’s pretty straight forward to figure out how many police officers you could add at a hundred thousand per.

But I like to think of Safe City and other organizations as a group of people who put a community face on law enforcement with a focus on prevention. As well as an opportunity for average citizens to become involved.

The police department, being for lack of a better term, being a quasi-military organization doesn’t really welcome a lot of people wandering through the building —their volunteers and so on. They need an auxiliary if you will, of volunteers within the community to come out and speak with the [inaudible] students and involve them in a non-confrontational non-enforcement basis.

So I see them as partners and to say we could buy three or four more officers is quite true but I think you’re buying a lot more at something in the neighbourhood, I think at two dollars per house if my math is correct.

I think of a couple of seminars just lately in Streetsville area where we didn’t really require more surveillance but the residents needed more help in trying to prevent crime in a neighbourhood and so on.

So it’s a little bit different angle and much like most prevention programs, they seem to be the first to get cut. There’s always money for treatment but never seems to be very much money for prevention. So I’m quite happy that the balance is there. In fact, overall, I think it’s a little bit light in terms of the work that they do and the value they add for that three hundred thousand so —although [turns to Safe City Mississauga Executive Board Members] I’m not suggesting you ask for more money this year.

But I think it’s a nice balance. It provides police with more of a community face to look after these kinds of issues so I don’t see it as Either Or but I certainly think that that request —and I didn’t speak earlier on your request. I supported it whole-heartedly and I think, you know, if we need to add more officers, we should do that with the Peel Police Budget to do that if that’s necessary.

And I know that through the closing of Community Stations, we’ve added, I think 17 officers back on the road. So I think it’s a pretty good balance and I’m prepared to continue to support the good work of Safe City —and other organizations that have the same sort of principles.

Thank you.

COUNCILLOR CAROLYN PARRISH (Acting Chair):

Seeing no more questions, thank you Ursula and we’ll go to….

VIDEO SWITCHES TO ENDORSEMENT OF PEEL YOUTH CHARTER
(October 25, 2007 Peel Regional Council)

LARRY ZACHER (Safe City Brampton):

“The absolute best thing we can do in the community is to provide seamless care for our children from the day they’re born til the time they become responsible adults. So it’s very timely that they’re here with the Children’s Charter and we’re here with the Peel Youth Charter…”

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT ENDS

What’s Absolute Gold about this video is that it crystallizes to Perfection two Roots of Youth Violence.

MISSISSAUGA COUNCILLOR GEORGE CARLSON avoids ACCOUNTABILITY-ISSUE raised regarding SAFE CITY MISSISSAUGA (January 27, 2010)

POLITICIANS’

1. REFUSAL TO ACKNOWLEDGE WHAT’S REALLY WRONG (ie:  a 1994 Peel Police recommendation that a “process of accountability and evaluation built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness” still hasn’t been begun for Safe City programs as of 2010.

and

2. NOT A SINGLE COUNCILLOR ASKED ME A QUESTION (or disputed my assertions that (quote) “’seamless care’ is no more out the starting gate than a “process of accountability and evaluation built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness”.

SAFE CITY BRAMPTON PEEL REGIONAL COUNCIL, LARRY ZACHER, "The absolute best thing we can do in the community is to provide seamless care for our children from the day they're born til the time they become responsible adults."

A process of accountability and evaluation should be built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness.” –Peel Police Services Board 1994.

Signed,

The (Inventing Your Successes: it can only get worse) Mississauga Muse

PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD discusses PEEL YOUTH CRIME/VIOLENCE (Video)

September 19th, 2008  

The Peel Police Services Board met this morning and one of the items on the agenda related to the upsurge in Youth Crimes and Violence (especially homicides). This video highlights Peel Police Deputy Chief Jennifer Evans as she provides preliminary data and insights to Board members. Also in the video, Susan Fennell, Mayor of The Corporation of the City of Brampton also offers comments regarding upcoming Youth-related “challenges”.

Video: PEEL POLICE SERVICES BOARD MEETING re: YOUTH VIOLENCE (10 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip of Google Video)

As a baseline comparision, I’ve cut and pasted the  November 17, 1994 Peel Police Services Board Internal Correspondence document, “Re: Community Summit – Final Report” from my September 16th Blog entry, “Peel Regional Police Services Board Crime Prevention Community Summit 1994 Final Report (the way we were…)”

While this 1994 Peel Police Services Board report (below) didn’t have any pics, the nature of the Net being what it is, I’ve provided media enhancement as they relate to both the 2000 and 2008 Mississauga Strategic Plans, Community Engagement Visionning Charrettes and the Mississauga Youth Plan.

Once again, special thanks to Chair Kolb who knows the importance of looking back.

 

Internal Correspondence


To: Chair and Members                                                              From: Frederick Biro

Dept: Police Services Board                                                        Dept: Police Services Board   ==============================================================================

Date: November 17, 1994

File Class:

Re: Community Summit – Final Report

Backqround Information and Discussion:

The Community Summit sponsored by the Regional Municipality of Peel Police Services Board was held September 30/October lst. The 80 suggestions forwarded as a result of the workshop discussions were condensed into 12 recommendations. These were reviewed and approved by the Community Summit Steering Committee.

It was the advice of the Steering Committee that each recommendation be forwarded to the attention of specific lead agencies who would have responsibility for reviewing and implementing the recommendation if they believed it to be of benefit. This suggestion was incorporated into the Final Report.

The Community Summit – Final Report, and a “How-To’ Manual was prepared by Ms. Sonia Mistri, Community Summit Co-ordinator. The Final Report includes an Executive Summary which is attached to this memorandum.

Complete copies of both documents will be available at the Board meeting.

Recommendation:

That the information be received;

further, that the Board, following review and consultation with the police service, respond to those recommendations that have applicability to the Peel Regional Police;

further, the Board determine what action, if any, it wishes to take to advance the goal of the Community Summit.

Frederick Biro

Executive Director

P.R.P. 40


PAGE 2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Regional Municipality of Peel prides itself on being a safe and secure environment for residents, workers and visitors. The Region of Peel has two active crime prevention associations, well supported by a dedicated police service. However, the responsibility and ownership for safety and security resides with all of Peel’s citizens and it is in this spirit that the Community Summit was conceived and developed.

The Community Summit brought together various partners from the community to share what was already being done to maintain the safety and security of the area, to determine what more could and should be done, and how it could be achieved. It was the inception of a multi-disciplinary and integrated effort within the Region of Peel to address the root causes of crime.

The Regional Municipality of Peel Police Services Board, as the link between police and community, was in a unique position to initiate and sponsor the Summit. At its meeting on April 22, 1994, the Board adopted a motion to sponsor the Community Summit with the objective of developing meaningful and practical strategies which would serve to maintain and enhance the safe and secure environment within the Regional Municipality of Peel.

The philosophy behind the Summit was based on the 1993 report from the federal government’s Standing Committee on Justice and the Solicitor General entitled `Crime Prevention in Canada: Toward a National Strategy.’ The crux of the report, and the mandate of the Summit, required the community to take responsibility for ensuring safety and security, and to do so by addressing the underlying social issues contributing to crime. Community agencies, organizations, police, government and citizens had to be partners in the prevention of criminal activity.

In June 1994, a Community Summit Steering Committee comprised of representatives from stakeholders and constituencies in the Region of Peel was assembled. It was formed to ensure full representation, and therefore ownership, throughout the planning and implementation of this initiative.

MISSISSAUGA *choke* YOUTH PLAN

The Community Summit took place on September 30 and October 1, 1994. Over 130 delegates, representing a wide cross-section of the community members, service providers, stakeholders, and political representatives, participated. Delegates pledged their commitment to the Summit’s objectives by signing a Declaration of Intent which read:

We, the undersigned, publicly declare our commitment to the fostering of a safe and secure community through local partnerships and initiatives, through a sense of ownership of both problems and solutions, and through pride in what has been and will be achieved in the Region of Peel.

PEEL YOUTH CHARTER 2007

PAGE 3

A total of twelve workshops focusing on issues specific to Peel Region were offered on Saturday. Workshop topics evolved through considerable research with stakeholders, service providers and community members as to which issues were most important and relevant to the Region of Peel.

The workshop topics were: Crime Prevention; Collaborative Action (taking control through partnership); Revitalizing Neighbourhoods; Youth and Crime; Building Relations Between Cultural Groups; Substance Abuse; Weapons Use; Family Safety and Security; Investing in our Future; Safety in the Home (domestic violence); and the Role of Senior Governments.

From these workshops, delegates generated a total of over eighty recommendations. These have been condensed into twelve specific proposals which are listed below. This report has been distributed to all stakeholders and bodies to whom the recommendations are addressed, as well as to all delegates and interested parties. A mailing list has been created to keep the community informed as to future happenings.

The Steering Committee will reconvene in one year to discuss the progress made on the implementation of each recommendation and to determine the next step or further course of action. In the interim, it was determined the Regional Task Force (Recommendation 3) would be the group best able to encourage, monitor and record progress made on the recommendations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Recommendation 1: Crime Prevention

Delegates recommend that crime prevention initiatives be unique and tailored to local communities. It is recognized that the two existing Crime Prevention Associations are the best vehicle for program development and implementation. A process of accountability and evaluation should be built into programs to ensure achievement of goals and cost-effectiveness.

Mississauga Councillor PAT SAITO on the Peel Youth Charter (3 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip of Google Video)

Recommendation 2: Security of Property

Delegates recommend that:

PAGE 4

Recommendation 3: Regional Task Force

Delegates recommend that the Regional government initiate and set up a Strategic Task Force to create a Strategic Plan for safety and security issues in the Region. The Task Force would co-ordinafe specific projects at the Regional level. This would complement and overlay the work of the local Crime Prevention Associations. A multi-disciplinary sub-committee of the Task Force should develop a youth strategy targeted at youth most at risk. The Task Force would also review funding levels and sources, and lobby the senior levels of government on crime prevention issues.

ETHICAL INFRASTRUCTURE for YOUTH


Recommendation 4: Planning

Delegates recommend that:

MissCorpSec guard prevents kids from entering (faces brushed)_

(kids’ faces slightly “brushed” for anonymity)

Recommendation 5: National Crime Prevention Council

Delegates recommend that:

—     The Justice computer network;

—     National Crime Prevention Council newsletters;

—     the creation of a database of information and contacts;

—     the Council hosting practitioners’ conferences;

—     the Council providing for training materials;

Recommendation 6: Youth

Delegates recognize the importance of preventing youth from becoming involved in criminal activity. It is recommended that:

PAGE 5

MALTON COMMUNITY CENTRE "without cause"

Recommendation 7: Programs In Schools

Delegates recommend that:

Recommendation 8: Skills Training

Delegates recommend that, for the purpose of raising individual self-esteem, recipients of social assistance be required to attend skills training sessions which focus on topics such as job skills, parenting skills and social skills.

Recommendation 9: Cultural Diversity

Delegates recommend that government funding at all levels be targeted towards:

MissCorpSec welcome wagon Malton Youth Meeting

PAGE 6

Recommendation 10: Substance Abuse

Delegates recommend that:

Recommendation 11: Weapons Use

Delegates recommend that:

Recommendation 12: Media, Television & Film Industry

Delegates recommend:

(NOVEMBER 17, 1994) DOCUMENT ENDS

 

And I might as well….

Video: PEEL YOUTH CHARTER PRESENTATION to MISSISSAUGA COUNCIL 071024 (19 min)

(Click here to go directly to the clip of Google Video)

 

Signed,

The Mississauga Muse

 

“I hope that the people we hire are sensitive to the fact that we are dealing with the public and we should give them every understanding possible.” (Hazel McCallion on Mississauga Corporate Security, March 17, 2007 Audit Committee Meeting)

“Social issues should not concern you.” (One City of Mississauga Commissioner, One Director, and One Manager to The Mississauga Muse)

Peel Regional Council Inaugural on 061207

`The truth is that we, as a society – all of us – simply don’t consider children very important. We talk a good game but we don’t think kids are as important as other things, like fixing the roads.’ (Jim Paul Nevins (Ontario Court Judge October 4, 2001 report)

 


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